Trade Credit Insurance

Trade Credit Insurance Bolsters Supply Chains

Key drivers are increased retail distress, but also bank eagerness to monetize.
By: | September 12, 2017 • 5 min read

After languishing for decades as a small fraction of the trade credit insurance (TCI) market in Europe, the U.S. business has started to blossom. There are several main drivers, according to underwriters and brokers, notably the increased involvement by banks in monetizing sales receivables, the first signs of tightening credit since the great recession, and increasing retail distress and bankruptcies.

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According to James Daly, president and chief executive officer of Euler Hermes in the Americas, the premium value for TCI in the U.S. in 2016 was $717 million, an increase of 3 percent over the previous year. EH is one of the ‘Big Three’ global underwriters and the largest carrier in the sector in the U.S.

Marsh estimates premium totals in round numbers of about $1 billion in the U.S., $2 billion in Asia-Pacific, $4 billion in Europe, and $1 billion in the rest of the world for a grand total of $8 billion worldwide.

Daly detailed that his firm assesses the TCI penetration in a region by number of possible client firms.

“Our view is that dollar value is distorted. We could write one huge corporation and that would skew the numbers. Based on the insurable universe we see penetration in the U.S. at 3 percent of companies, as compared to 10-15 percent of possible companies in Europe.”

In roughly similar numbers, underwriter XL Catlin estimates that something between 4-7 percent of receivables are covered in the U.S., as compared to 15-20 percent in Europe.

“Supply-chain financing is a big application for TCI,” — Stephen Atallah, senior executive vice president for commercial and risk underwriting, Coface

According to estimates aggregated by brokerage Arthur. J. Gallagher from data provided by insureds, the volume of insured transactions written out of the U.S. grew from $48 billion in 1992 to $450 billion in 2012, adjusted for inflation. That includes domestic transactions as well as international transactions by entities operating and insured out of the U.S.

While that growth is impressive in absolute terms, it represents a large increase from a small base. Citing historical figures, Marc Wagman, managing director of Gallagher’s U.S. trade credit and political risk practice group detailed that the U.S. volume of insured transactions grew during those 20 years from well under one half of one percent of gross domestic product to more than 3 percent of GDP. In contrast, the portion of insured transactions in other OECD countries ranges from 5 percent to 8 percent of GDP.

“It is true that the percentage of participation is higher in Europe than in the U.S. but that gap has narrowed,” said Wagman.

“Demand in this country has been quite robust, and as a result more underwriters are coming in.”

While still a fraction of the market size in Europe and Asia, TCI has grown robustly in the U.S.

“When I started in this business in 1996 there were maybe half a dozen underwriters writing short-term, multi-buyer coverage,” Wagman added.

“Now we work with at least 15 carriers, and there are dozens of Lloyd’s markets.”

Marc Wagman, managing director of Gallagher’s U.S. trade credit and political risk practice group

Within any country or region, premiums vary according to the size of the insureds and their business models.

“The average premium in the U.S. is about $40,000 a year,” said Daly at EH. “In the U.K. that would be similar. But in a country like Poland the average premium drops to about 10,000 euros because the companies there are smaller and there are more start ups.”

Which is not to say that small firms are lesser clients. Quite to the contrary.

“We become part of the client’s risk and credit management,” said Daly.

“This is how they expand safely and it is the real growth driver. Say there is a small manufacturer in the U.S. that has grown well domestically, and suddenly gets an order for 10,000 widgets from Chile, on 30-days’ terms. We can tell that manufacturer, ‘go ahead, trade, we know that buyer, we will underwrite the risk.’ The insurance part is only the last piece. The information comes first.”

As the U.S. market grows, adding underwriters and capacity, innovation follows. “There is a willingness to write larger single-buyer limits on sub-investment grade names as well as more ‘non-trade’ type of business,” said Wagman at Gallagher.

“And there are more carriers willing to write non-cancellable coverage or hybrid programs that have both non-cancellable and cancellable components.”

He stressed that the underwriting approach taken — cancellable versus non-cancellable — depends upon the client’s needs. In a non-cancellable policy, the underwriter commits to insure counter-party risk for the insured up to a limit, and that limit is good for the policy year, even if there is deterioration of the insured’s credit risk.

In a cancellable policy, if there is a deterioration of the client’s credit risk, the carrier can give a month or two of notice and cancel the limit for future shipments. The underwriter is still responsible for coverage of existing receivables up to that point.

Wagman observed that cancellable coverage is often misunderstood.

“This is not the insurer telling the client with whom to do business. For the most part, cancellable coverage is for smaller businesses that don’t have their own credit departments and rely upon the underwriter for that credit limit decision-making support.”

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The growing element in TCI is lending and capitalization, said Stephen Atallah, senior executive vice president for commercial and risk underwriting at Coface, another of the Big Three global underwriters. The third is Atradius.

“Supply-chain financing is a big application for TCI,” Atallah said.

“The banks have discovered this, and are gulping up capacity,” he said. That’s led to more product innovation, he added.

Banks that acquire receivables may be the insureds themselves, or they may be the loss payee on receivables pledged as collateral. Sometimes banks require TCI before they will lend against receivables, other times they merely make it known that insured business gets an advantage on rates and terms.

Atallah noted that hybrid contracts, with a non-cancellable top tier and cancellable coverage for the bulk of an insured’s sales, has been around for a long time.

“Those are a way to address the common mismatch between what the client wants and what the carriers can underwrite. Clients often want non-cancellable coverage for riskier customers. The innovation is delayed cancellation. No one wants to wake up to find they don’t have coverage. Pulling a line should not throw a business into turmoil. So now there is 30-, 60-, and 90-day notice.”

While carriers might bemoan soft rates in a competitive market, Clay Sasse, managing director and U.S. practice leader for trade credit at Aon suggested that new entrants are spurring penetration.

“Once the recession was over, everyone was still spooked,” he recalled. But since then the participants have increased greatly. &

Gregory DL Morris is an independent business journalist based in New York with 25 years’ experience in industry, energy, finance and transportation. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

In the Fast-Paced World of Retail, This Risk Manager Strives to Mitigate Risks Proactively and Keep Senior Leaders Informed

Janine Kral works to identify and mitigate risks, building strong partnerships with leaders and ensuring they see her as support rather than a blocker. 
By: | October 29, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My very first paid job was working on my uncle’s ranch in British Columbia in the summers. He had cattle, horses and grapes — an unusual combo. But my first real job out of college was as a multi-line claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Right out of college I applied for a job that turned out to be a claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual. I accepted because they were offering six weeks of training in Southern California, and at the time that sounded really fun. I spent about three years at Liberty Mutual and then I spent a short period of time at a smaller regional insurance company that hired me to start a workers’ compensation claims administration program.

I was hired at Nordstrom as the Washington Region Risk Manager, which was my first job in risk management. When I started at Nordstrom, the risk management department had about five people, and over the years it has grown to about 75. I’ve been vice president for 11 years.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I would say that technology has probably been the biggest change. When I started many years ago, it was all paper and no RMIS.

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R&I: What risks does the retail industry face that are unique?

We deal with a lot of people — employees and customers. With physical brick and mortar settings, there are the unique exposures with people moving in and out in a public environment. And of course, with ecommerce, we have a lot of customer and employee data, which creates cyber risk — which is not necessarily a unique risk in today’s environment.

R&I: Can you describe your approach to working with senior leaders and front-line staff alike to further risk management initiatives?

It starts with keeping the pulse of what’s happening with the business. Retail moves really fast. In order to identify and mitigate risks proactively, we identify top risk areas and topics, and then we ensure that we have strong partnerships with the leaders responsible for those areas. Trust is critical, ensuring that leaders see us as a support rather than a blocker.

R&I: What role does technology play in your company’s approach to risk management?

Janine Kral, claims adjuster, Nordstrom

We have an internal risk management information system that all of our locations report events into — every type of incident is reported, whether insured or uninsured. Most of these events are managed internally by risk management, and our guidelines require that prevention be analyzed on each one. Having all event data in one system allows us to use the data for trending and also helps us better predict what may happen in the future, and who we need to work with to mitigate risks.

R&I: What advice might you give to students or other aspiring risk managers?

My son is a sophomore in college, and I tell him and his friends all the time not to rule out insurance as a career opportunity. My advice is to cast a wide net and do your homework. Research all the different types of opportunities. Read a lot — articles, industry magazines, LinkedIn. Be proactive and reach out to people you find interesting and ask them about their careers. Don’t be shy and wait for people and opportunities to come to you. Ask questions. Build networks. Be curious and keep an open mind.

R&I: What are your goals for the next five to 10 years of your career?

I have always been passionate about continuous improvement. I want to continue to find ways to add value to my company and to this industry.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

My favorite book is Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. It’s a true story about a man who was in prison in Australia after being convicted of armed robbery, and he escaped to India. While in India, he passed himself off as a doctor in a slum. It’s a really interesting story, because this is a convicted criminal who ends up helping others. I am not always successful in getting others to read the book because it’s 1,000 pages and definitely a commitment.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Fiorella’s in Newton, Massachusetts. Great Italian food and a great overall experience.

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R&I: What is your favorite drink?

“Sister Carol.” I have no idea what is in it, and I can only get it at a local bar in Seattle. It’s green but it’s delicious.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Skydiving. Not tandem and without any sort of communication from the ground. Scary standing on a wing of a plane, but very peaceful once the chute opened, slowly floating down by myself.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

I can’t think of one individual person. For me, the real heroes are people who have a positive attitude in the face of adversity. People who are resilient no matter what life brings them.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

It’s rewarding to help solve problems and help people. I am proud of the support that my team provides others. &




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]