Alternative Energy

Lithium-Ion Batteries Strain Risk Management

The Fire Department of New York is concerned about grid storage safety.
By: | August 1, 2017 • 3 min read

New York City is agressively adding solar capacity. But the risks of energy storage must be addressed.

In September 2016, New York City committed to an ambitious program of solar energy and storage. The plan calls for 100 MWh of energy storage by 2020 and 1 GW of solar capacity by 2030. Photovoltaic technology is well established, but the lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery technology used to store the collected energy is much more fraught. Within weeks, the Fire Department of New York expressed concerns about retrofitting commercial- and industrial-scale batteries, called grid storage, into the density of the city.


In January 2017, underwriters with FM Global issued an 18-page data sheet with loss-prevention recommendations for Li-ion installations. Some specialty insurers have been willing to underwrite standalone Li-ion grid storage, others so far have only been willing to cover such installations as part of a broader property policy for a renewable-energy generation facility or power plant.

“We think we can come up with schemes that will provide reasonable levels of protection now and in the future.” — Gary Keith, vice president, engineering standards manager, FM Global.

Li-ion batteries power cell phones, tablet computers, and some electric cars. They are compact, dense, and represent the leading edge of storage efficiency. Those same characteristics make them prone to runaway overheating if there is a short or damage to a cell. There have been notorious examples of burning devices and even vehicles in recent years.

There have also been fires at grid storage installations. The most notable was a 2012 incident in Hawaii. A 15 MW grid storage array with 12,000 cells was destroyed by fire at the 30 MW Kahuku wind farm on Oahu.

Li-ion grid storage “in conjunction with wind or solar provides stability into the grid as well as peak performance,” said Charles Long, area supervisor for energy at brokerage Arthur J. Gallagher.

Gary Keith, vice president, engineering standards manager, FM Global

“For some underwriters, grid storage is literally too hot to handle. Others are willing to quote but very selectively. For a large utility the insurers will pick it up no worries, but for a phone-battery maker looking to move up to grid storage, they would find a lot of resistance in the market.”

Long emphasized that the big issue for grid storage is not the value of the battery but the potential for business interruption.

“The BI is usually significantly higher than the property. If a 200 to 300 MW wind farm loses its grid-storage, that may be $20 million to replace the battery but a $40 million BI loss if the power-purchase agreement mandates battery backup.”

Gary Keith, vice president engineering standards manager at FM Global, said that with the proliferation of microgrids and grid storage, it was important for his firm to issue the data sheet as soon as it could.

“We are going to see more and more mandates for this type of storage. Power generation is one aspect of the issue, but our motivation for the data sheet was usage expanding to independent power availability in commercial and industrial applications.”

There are two key points, Keith stressed.

“The fire hazard is from a short or damage that causes a runaway chemical reaction, not from the ambient heat of operation. Also, Li-ion is not lithium metal [which reacts violently with water]. We recommend sprinkler protection, and separation, at least 20 feet from any other structure or exposure.”


While the proliferation of microgrids and grid storage represents a clear emerging risk, “the technology is not outside current fire codes and practices,” said Keith at FM Global.

“We think we can come up with schemes that will provide reasonable levels of protection now and in the future.”

That future looks very big. According to the University of Michigan Center for Sustainable Systems, as of June 2016, the U.S. had more than 21.6 GW of rated power in energy storage compared to 1,068 GW of total in-service installed generation capacity. Globally, installed energy storage totaled 150 GW.

Only 2.5 percent of delivered electric power in the U.S. is cycled through a storage facility. For comparison, that figure is 10 percent in Europe and 15 percent in Japan. U.S. energy storage projects increased by 105 percent from 2013 to 2016. California leads with 149 operational projects (4.03 GW), followed by Virginia with 3.25 GW and Texas with 24 projects.

Gregory DL Morris is an independent business journalist based in New York with 25 years’ experience in industry, energy, finance and transportation. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Janet Sheiner, VP of risk management and real estate at AMN Healthcare Services Inc., sees innovation as an answer to fast-evolving and emerging risks.
By: | March 5, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

As a kid, bagging groceries. My first job out of school, part-time temp secretary.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Risk management picks you; you don’t necessarily pick it. I came into it from a regulatory compliance angle. There’s a natural evolution because a lot of your compliance activities also have the effect of managing your risk.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?


There’s much benefit to grounding strategic planning in an ERM framework. That’s a great innovation in the industry, to have more emphasis on ERM. I also think that risk management thought leaders are casting themselves more as enablers of business, not deterrents, a move in the right direction.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Justified or not, risk management functions are often viewed as the “Department of No.” We’ve worked hard to cultivate a reputation as the “Department of Maybe,” so partners across the organization see us as business enablers. That reputation has meant entertaining some pretty crazy ideas, but our willingness to try and find a way to “yes” tempered with good risk management has made all the difference.

Janet Sheiner, VP, Risk Management & Real Estate, AMN Healthcare Services Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, of course!  America’s Finest City has the infrastructure, Convention Center, hotels, airport and public transportation — plus you can’t beat our great weather! The restaurant scene is great, not to mention those beautiful coastal views.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The emergence of risk management as a distinct profession, with four-year degree programs and specific academic curriculum. Now I have people on my team who say their goal is to be a risk manager. I said before that risk management picks you, but we’re getting to a point where people pick it.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?


The commercial insurance market’s ability to innovate to meet customer demand. Businesses need to innovate to stay relevant, and the commercial market needs to innovate with us.  Carriers have to be willing to take on more risk and potentially take a loss to meet the unique and evolving risks companies are facing.

R&I: Of which insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion?

Beazley. They have been an outstanding partner to AMN. They are responsive, flexible and reasonable.  They have evolved with us. They have an appreciation for risk management practices we’ve organically woven into our business, and by extension, this makes them more comfortable with taking on new risks with us.

R&I: Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the U.S. health care industry and why?

I am very optimistic about the health care industry. We have an aging population with burgeoning health care needs, coupled with a decreasing supply of health care providers — that means we have to get smarter about how we manage health care. There’s a lot of opportunity for thought leaders to fill that gap.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Professionally, AMN Healthcare General Counsel, Denise Jackson, has enabled me to do the best work I’ve ever done, and better than I thought I could do.  Personally, my husband Andrew, a second-grade teacher, who has a way of putting things into a human perspective.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

In my early 20s, I set a goal for the “corner office.” I achieved that when I became vice president.  I received a ‘Values in Practice’ award for trust at AMN. The nomination came from team members I work with every day, and I was incredibly humbled and honored.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The noir genre, so anything by Raymond Chandler in books. For movies,  “Double Indemnity,” the 1944 Billy Wilder classic, with insurance at the heart of it!

R&I: What is your favorite drink?


Clean water. Check out for how to help people enjoy clean, safe water.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant at which you’ve eaten?

Liqun Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

China. See favorite restaurant above. This restaurant had been open for 100 years in that location. It didn’t exactly have an “A” rating, and it was probably not a place most risk managers would go to.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Eating that duck at Liqun!

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Dr. Seuss who, in response to a 1954 report in Life magazine, worked to reduce illiteracy among school children by making children’s books more interesting. His work continues to educate and entertain children worldwide.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

They’re not really sure!

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]