Cyber Talent

Fast Facts on Women in Cyber Security

The underrepresentation of women in cyber security is a huge driver behind the talent skills gap in this sector.
By: | August 30, 2018 • 3 min read

In an increasingly digital economy, the supply of talent for cyber roles is no longer meeting demand.

Last year, the (ISC)² Global Information Security Workforce Study 2017 projected a 1.8 million cyber security worker shortfall by 2022, an increase of 20 percent on the 1.5 million shortfall it projected in 2015. One of the biggest contributors to this fall in talent is a lack of diversity in hiring in the cyber realm.

A huge contributor that is driving the skills gap is the underrepresentation of women in cyber security. And while programs and other facilities exist to garner cyber security interest in young girls, many aren’t finding their way into the field due to any number of reasons.

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In fact, studies have found that many women feel undervalued, unheard and discriminated against in the cyber security profession. Further study proved women in cyber earned less than men on average and at every level. Globally, men were found to be four times more likely to be in a C-level cyber security position, four times more likely to be in executive management and nine times more likely to be in a managerial position.

Below are some fast facts on women in cyber security, adding yet another piece to the puzzle of why there are so few women joining this growing field.

Women in Cyber Security: The Numbers

  • There’s only 11 percent of female representation in cyber security roles globally.
  • Of that, 14 percent of female representation in cyber security roles are in North America.
  • Europe holds only 7 percent of female representation in cyber security roles,
  • while 8 percent of female representation in cyber security roles are in Asia.
  • There’s a $4,540-North American executive management cyber security salary gap (as of 2017),
  • and a $5,000-North American non-managerial cyber security salary gap (as of 2017).
  • 51 percent of women in cyber security hold a Masters’ degree or higher, while only 45 percent of men have such education.
  • In a study, 51 percent of women in cyber security claimed to have faced discrimination while on the job.

Information gathered from Center for Cyber Safety & Education/(ISC)².

Antony Ireland is a London-based financial journalist. He can be reached at [email protected]

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The R&I Editorial Team can be reached at [email protected]