2017 Power Broker

2017 Power Broker® Rising Stars

Rising Stars are winners and finalists in Risk & Insurance®’s Power Broker® award who are being recognized as future leaders of the industry. Since the launch of this designation, more than 325 brokers have been so recognized.

Risk & Insurance® celebrates these Rising Stars for their  creativity, exceptional customer service and industry knowledge in finding solutions for their clients.

Chris Ainscough, 31
Aon, Cleveland
Health Care

Yogesh Amar, 32
Marsh, New York
Utilities

Jay Brancaleone, 36
Aon, Boston
Private Client

William Bray, 31
Wells Fargo, Houston
Real Estate

 

 

Wesley Bryan, 35
Wortham, Houston
Marine

Dawn Buelow, 39
Marsh, Chicago
Pharmaceutical

 

Alex Burton, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher, Atlanta
Education

John Byers, 35
Aon, Franklin, Tenn.
Employee Benefits

 

Karen Cangemi, 36
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Louis Cipollo, 37
Aon, Philadelphia
Environmental

 

Seth Cohen, 33
HUB, Encino, Calif.
Entertainment

 

Brandon Cole, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher, Irvine, Calif.
Nonprofit

 

Edward Conlon, 38
Aon, New York
Financial Services

 

Logan Couch, 31
Aon, Houston
Energy, Traditional

 

Laura Decker, 27
Aon, New York
Environmental

Natalie Douglass, 38
Arthur J. Gallagher, St. Louis
At Large

 

Philip Dunn, 34
Aon, Philadelphia
Financial Services

 

Hardie Edgecombe, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher, Metiaire, La.
Marine

 

Jessica Fields, 34
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Steve Fisk, 35
Barney & Barney, Aliso Viejo, Calif.
Retail

 

Amber Fixter, 35
Willis Towers Watson, New York
Environmental

 

Nicole Francis, 34
Marsh, Danville, Calif.
Health Care

 

David Fraser, 38
Aon, New York
At Large

 

John Galanis, 34
Aon/Albert G. Ruben, New York
Entertainment

 

Jeremy Gayser, 37
Aon, Houston
Energy, Traditional

George Gionis, 34
Aon, Philadelphia
Public Sector

Katherine Glancy Johnston, 33
Aon, Chicago
At Large

 

Mike Gong, 37
Arthur J. Gallagher, Fresno, Calif.
Real Estate

 

Chip Hardie, 30
Marsh, Philadelphia
Utilities

 

Jason Helfert, 37
Horton Group, Orland Park, Ill.
Nonprofit

 

Courtney Hensley, 38
Aon, Franklin, Tenn.
Education

 

Marcus Henthorn, 32
Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Public Sector

 

Blythe Hogan, 32
Aon, Atlanta
Fine Arts

 

Mira Jacinto, 31
Marsh, Los Angeles
Marine

 

Chris Kakel, 39
Woodruff-Sawyer & Co., Denver
Transportation

 

Nick Kalist, 39
Aon, St. Louis
Financial Services

Kate Kenny, 32
Marsh, Chicago
Education

 

Amy Klitzke, 34
Aon, Minneapolis
Pharmaceutical

 

Charles Krauth, 30
Aon, Atlanta
Health Care

 

Matt Kupiec, 30
Willis Towers Watson, New York
Financial Services

 

Tyler LaMantia, 30
Arthur J. Gallagher, Chicago
Education

 

Robert Logan, 34
Aon, Dallas
Energy, Renewable

 

Tony Lorber, 38
EPIC, San Francisco
Real Estate

 

Kimberly Mann, 28
Marsh, Philadelphia
Environmental

 

Kristina Marcigliano, 28
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

 

Elizabeth Marshall, 28
Marsh, Chicago
Education

Cara McGrath, 31
Alliant, Boston
Energy, Traditional

 

Michael Menerey, 38
Alliant, Los Angeles
Employee Benefits

 

Duncan Milne, 34
Aon, New York
Public Sector

 

Alex Muralles, 36
Willis Towers Watson, Chicago
Financial Services

 

Christina Murphy, 31
Marsh, Houston
Energy, Traditional

 

Kelly Nash, 37
Marsh, Chicago
Private Client

 

Lee Newmark, 29
Arthur J. Gallagher, Itasca, Ill.
Health Care

 

Blake Parrish, 30
Marsh, Los Angeles
Energy, Renewable

 

Caroline Parrish, 39
Aon, Miami
Real Estate

 

Brian Pfund, 34
Marsh, Portland, Ore.
At Large

 

Andrew Racle, 33
Aon, San Francisco
At Large

 

Sanju Rajan, 31
Aon, Baltimore
Transportation

 

Nicholas Rawden, 31
Marsh, Rochester, N.Y.
Real Estate

 

Daniel R’bibo, 37
Arthur J. Gallagher, Glendale, Calif.
Entertainment

 

Brent Rieth, 31
Aon, San Francisco
Technology

 

Robert Rosenzweig, 31
Risk Strategies, New York
Technology

 

Galo Santana, 35
Aon, New York
Technology

 

John Selgrath, 36
Integro, San Francisco
Health Care

Ryan Shinkle, 33
Arthur J. Gallagher, Lafayette, La.
Construction

 

Kate Simons, 31
Aon, Chicago
Retail

 

Josh Thompson, 36
Aon, Little Rock, Ark.
Transportation

 

Emily Weiss, 30
DeWitt Stern, New York
Fine Arts

 

Jeremiah White, 39
Aon, Frederick, Md.
Transportation

 

Casey Wigglesworth, 38
Aon, Washington, D.C.
Fine Arts

 

Susan Young, 31
Marsh, Seattle
Retail

 

Eric Ziff, 32
Aon, New York
At Large

 

Fred Zutel, 30
Willis Towers Watson, Miami
Real Estate

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

4 Companies That Rocked It by Treating Injured Workers as Equals; Not Adversaries

The 2018 Teddy Award winners built their programs around people, not claims, and offer proof that a worker-centric approach is a smarter way to operate.
By: | October 30, 2018 • 3 min read

Across the workers’ compensation industry, the concept of a worker advocacy model has been around for a while, but has only seen notable adoption in recent years.

Even among those not adopting a formal advocacy approach, mindsets are shifting. Formerly claims-centric programs are becoming worker-centric and it’s a win all around: better outcomes; greater productivity; safer, healthier employees and a stronger bottom line.

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That’s what you’ll see in this month’s issue of Risk & Insurance® when you read the profiles of the four recipients of the 2018 Theodore Roosevelt Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Award, sponsored by PMA Companies. These four programs put workers front and center in everything they do.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top,” said Steve Legg, director of risk management for Starbucks.

Starbucks put claims reporting in the hands of its partners, an exemplary act of trust. The coffee company also put itself in workers’ shoes to identify and remove points of friction.

That led to a call center run by Starbucks’ TPA and a dedicated telephonic case management team so that partners can speak to a live person without the frustration of ‘phone tag’ and unanswered questions.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top.” — Steve Legg, director of risk management, Starbucks

Starbucks also implemented direct deposit for lost-time pay, eliminating stressful wait times for injured partners, and allowing them to focus on healing.

For Starbucks, as for all of the 2018 Teddy Award winners, the approach is netting measurable results. With higher partner satisfaction, it has seen a 50 percent decrease in litigation.

Teddy winner Main Line Health (MLH) adopted worker advocacy in a way that goes far beyond claims.

Employees who identify and report safety hazards can take credit for their actions by sending out a formal “Employee Safety Message” to nearly 11,000 mailboxes across the organization.

“The recognition is pretty cool,” said Steve Besack, system director, claims management and workers’ compensation for the health system.

MLH also takes a non-adversarial approach to workers with repeat injuries, seeing them as a resource for identifying areas of improvement.

“When you look at ‘repeat offenders’ in an unconventional way, they’re a great asset to the program, not a liability,” said Mike Miller, manager, workers’ compensation and employee safety for MLH.

Teddy winner Monmouth County, N.J. utilizes high-tech motion capture technology to reduce the chance of placing new hires in jobs that are likely to hurt them.

Monmouth County also adopted numerous wellness initiatives that help workers manage their weight and improve their wellbeing overall.

“You should see the looks on their faces when their cholesterol is down, they’ve lost weight and their blood sugar is better. We’ve had people lose 30 and 40 pounds,” said William McGuane, the county’s manager of benefits and workers’ compensation.

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Do these sound like minor program elements? The math says otherwise: Claims severity has plunged from $5.5 million in 2009 to $1.3 million in 2017.

At the University of Pennsylvania, putting workers first means getting out from behind the desk and finding out what each one of them is tasked with, day in, day out — and looking for ways to make each of those tasks safer.

Regular observations across the sprawling campus have resulted in a phenomenal number of process and equipment changes that seem simple on their own, but in combination have created a substantially safer, healthier campus and improved employee morale.

UPenn’s workers’ comp costs, in the seven-digit figures in 2009, have been virtually cut in half.

Risk & Insurance® is proud to honor the work of these four organizations. We hope their stories inspire other organizations to be true partners with the employees they depend on. &

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]