Risk Insider: Jason Beans

Workers’ Comp: Like a Nasty Divorce

By: | April 17, 2015 • 4 min read
Jason Beans is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Rising Medical Solutions, a medical cost management firm. He has over 20 years of industry experience. He can be reached at [email protected]

I have followed the ProPublica/NPR article series on “The Demolition of Workers’ Comp,” and the subsequent reactions with interest. From the implication that the system is being decimated at the expense of American workers, to various points of disagreement from industry parties, I have found a lot to consider.

ProPublica ignited a debate that is still alive, and one that I felt it prudent to give considerable thought to before weighing in.

One major realization I’ve come to is that workers’ comp cases can be a lot like a nasty divorce.

In the aftermath, there are two households to support and both sides believe the other is “screwing” them. One spouse is certain they are “right” and the other is clearly “wrong.” But the truth, as it so often does, lies in shades of gray.

I think this is where we find ourselves in the ProPublica debate.

In workers’ comp, employers often have to cover massive costs, typically for a person who is no longer working or producing. The injured worker does not have the same earning power or quality of life.

Nothing the insurer can do will take away the fact that someone has lost a limb or is a quadriplegic. The story is a sad one, no matter what the outcome.

If we can help 10 injured workers have a better life, but cost thousands of U.S. jobs, have we done a good or bad thing for society?

To be frank, when I began reading the ProPublica report, my initial reaction was that it likely amounted to sensationalism masquerading as journalism. There are some well-founded points, though we do everyone a disservice — injured workers, employers, and insurers alike — if we do not look past the anecdotes to the tough questions.

As in a nasty divorce, it is tempting to point fingers and place blame. But if we want to truly understand the realities of workers’ comp today, we must resist the urge to oversimplify.

If you’ve been following all of the punches and counter-punches, then you know significant attention has been given to ProPublica’s use or misuse of statistics. So instead I will touch on some of the other issues raised but in a much broader context.

The Costs of Competition

Workers’ comp does not function in a vacuum, it operates in a national and global free market system. The cost of labor is a major factor in this system and determines where companies hire and expand.

In a global economy, every state and country compete to see if the job can be done better, faster, cheaper. Additionally, labor markets are increasingly competing with robotics and automation.

That means every action has a reaction, and that includes consequences for every increase in workers’ compensation costs and benefits.

If we can help 10 injured workers have a better life, but cost thousands of U.S. jobs, have we done a good or bad thing for society? We have to consider the larger price we may pay for the decisions we make today.

Consider, too, that if employers and insurers cease to turn a profit, they cease to exist.

The ProPublica article contends that worker’s comp reforms are being driven by employers seeking to increase profits. Any dubious math aside, it is important to understand that in insurance, some measure of profitability has more to do with market forces than with work comp laws. Massive amounts of capital are needed to underwrite insurance, and the majority of that capital rests with reinsurers.

Reinsurers invest wherever the risk is lowest and the returns are highest. Higher risk/lower return investments (such as workers’ compensation in U.S. states) will see less capital, subsequently driving prices up, while low risk/high return markets will see a flood of capital that drives prices down.

Overall, insurance profitability must match the market’s profitability or we will have no insurance. What then?

Don’t Oversimplify … or Overcomplicate … Comp

We face tough decisions with no perfect answers in workers’ comp. For example, when a carrier underwrites workers’ compensation, their liability is unknown. Cases from the 1950’s are still open.

There is no way to predict medical improvements. A prosthesis might have been all that was available when a carrier wrote a policy fifty years ago. Now they are expected to cover a robotic limb that can cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. Is that fair? It’s not a simple issue.

Overall, insurance profitability must match the market’s profitability or we will have no insurance. What then?

We as an industry can also complicate matters by tripping over dollars to save pennies. This is devastating to workers and, over time, the payers’ bottom line.

The best payers I have seen jump to take care of injured employees. When you do everything possible to help workers get to pre-injury status or maximum improvement, it’s pretty easy to identify the frauds.

Really, there are two choices in claims management. Distrust everyone until they prove they are legitimate, or assume they are legitimate until they prove otherwise — the latter produces better results.

Despite ProPublica’s implications to the contrary, the vast majority of people I know in workers’ comp are well-intentioned, want the best for injured workers, and want a system that supports them. But we face challenges, and how we address these difficult issues will have far-reaching, even global, ripple effects for employees, employment rates, employers and carriers alike.

We have to approach the tough questions — and answers — we face with the understanding that things are never simply black or white, and reaching solutions often lies in the shades of gray.

Kind of like a good marriage.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession

As a professor of business, Jack Hampton knows firsthand the positive impact education has on risk managers as they tackle growing risks.
By: | April 9, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Ellen Thrower, president (retired), The College of Insurance, introduced me to the importance of insurance as a component of risk management. Further, she encouraged me to explore strategic and operational risk as foundation topics shaping the role of the modern risk manager.

Chris Mandel, former president of RIMS and Risk Manager of the Year, introduced me to the emerging area of enterprise risk management. He helped me recognize the need to align hazard, strategic, operational and financial risk into a single framework. He gave me the perspective of ERM in a high-tech environment, using USAA as a model program that later won an excellence award for innovation.

Bob Morrell, founder and former CEO of Riskonnect, showed me how technology could be applied to solving serious risk management and governance problems. He created a platform that made some of my ideas practical and extended them into a highly-successful enterprise that served risk and governance management needs of major corporations.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

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From a background in corporate finance and commercial banking, I accepted the position of provost of The College of Insurance. Recognizing my limited prior knowledge in the field, I became a student of insurance and risk management leading to authorship of books on hazard and financial risk. This led to industry consulting, as well as to the development of graduate-level courses and concentrations in MBA programs.

R&I: What was your first job?

The provost position was the first job I had in the industry, after serving as dean of the Seton Hall University School of Business and founding The Princeton Consulting Group. Earlier positions were in business development with Marine Transport Lines, consulting in commercial banking and college professorships.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Creating a risk management concentration in the MBA program at Saint Peter’s, co-founding the Russian Risk Management Society (RUSRISK), and writing “Fundamentals of Enterprise Risk Management” and the “AMA Handbook of Financial Risk Management.”

A few years ago, I expanded into risk management in higher education. From 2017 into 2018, Rowman and Littlefield published my four books that address risks facing colleges and universities, professors, students and parents.

Jack Hampton, Professor of Business, St. Peter’s University

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The Godfather. I see it as a story of managing risk, even as the behavior of its leading characters create risk for others.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Jameson’s Irish whiskey. Mixed with a little ice, it is a serious rival for Johnny Walker Gold scotch and Jack Daniel’s Tennessee whiskey.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Mount Etna, Taormina, and Agrigento, Sicily. I actually supervised an MBA program in Siracusa and learned about risk from a new perspective.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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Army Airborne training and jumping out of an airplane. Fortunately, I never had to do it in combat even though I served in Vietnam.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

George C. Marshall, one of the most decorated military leaders in American history, architect of the economic recovery program for Europe after World War II, and recipient of the 1953 Nobel Peace Prize. For Marshall, it was not just about winning the war. It was also about winning the peace.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Sharing lessons with colleagues and students by writing, publishing and teaching. A professor with a knowledge of risk management does not only share lessons. The professor is also a student when MBA candidates talk about the risks they manage every day.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Sensitizing for-profit, nonprofit and governmental agencies to the exposures and complexities facing their organizations. Sometimes we focus too much on strategies that sound good but do not withstand closer examination. Risk managers help organizations make better decisions.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

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Developing executive training programs to help risk managers assume C-suite positions in organizations. Insurance may be a good place to start but so is an MBA degree. The Risk and Insurance Management Society recognizes the importance of a wide range of risk knowledge. Colleges and universities need to catch up with RIMS.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk and its impact on hazard, operational and financial strategies. A terrorist can take down a building. A cyber-criminal can take down much more.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

My family members think I’m a professor. They do not seem to be too interested in my views on risk management.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]