Risk Management

Stopping Supply Chain Slavery

Governments are cracking down on the use of slave labor in supply chains. Companies risk their reputations if they don’t find the practice on their own and end it.
By: | October 1, 2016 • 7 min read

Modern day slavery is alive and well.

And with large food companies such as Nestle, Archer Daniels Midland Co. and Cargill under legal fire for selling products that were allegedly made in part by slave labor (often unpaid child labor), it’s critical that all companies know the score throughout their ever-expanding global supply chains.

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In the latest example of the U.S. government attempting to stop — or at least greatly reduce — modern slavery, U.S. Customs and Border Protection seized low-calorie sweetener stevia imported from China by PureCircle Ltd. The plant extract is used to sweeten Coca-Cola Life, Pepsi True and other soft drinks. The U.S. alleged that PureCircle sourced the Stevia rebaudiana plant (from which the sweetener is extracted) from a company accused of using forced labor, Reuters reported in early June.

It’s the third time the U.S. has cracked down using a new law that bans imports of products made by forced labor. The importer had three months to prove its innocence, according to Reuters.

There is growing pressure on risk managers to have a much more focused approach to supply chain management, said Andrew Boutros, a former U.S. attorney and partner in the Chicago office of Seyfarth Shaw.

“It really comes down to compliance professionals making judgment calls,” he said. “Compliance often is viewed as a cost center, so companies spend their dollars on the highest litigation risks. But as these new statutes become more enforced, there will be more attention paid to them.”

“It’s very hard to verify with confidence that [a product component] … made its way to the U.S. without slavery, corruption, bribery, falsification, etc.,”  – Andrew Boutros, partner, Seyfarth Shaw

Boutros said determining if there is a slave labor component in the supply chain is more often than not an incredibly complex endeavor.

Andrew Boutros, partner, Seyfarth Shaw

Andrew Boutros, partner, Seyfarth Shaw

“Imagine being able to know with a high degree of confidence if the beans in your coffee were collected using forced labor,” he said. “And that’s just coffee. What about parts in computers or tech gadgets? Or minerals and certain metals? Or the fishing industry?

“It’s very hard to verify with confidence that it made its way to the U.S. without slavery, corruption, bribery, falsification, etc.,” he said.

The scope of modern day slavery is devastating.

According to the Walk Free Foundation’s Global Slavery Index 2016, there are about 45.8 million people working as slaves globally, with 58 percent in India, China, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Uzbekistan. That number includes sex trafficking, which would not be part of supply chain data.

For example, as of 2014, the United Nations estimated 21 million slave labor victims worldwide. Also, a 2014 report from the UN’s International Labor Organization (ILO) estimates that $150 billion in illegal profits are made in the private economy each year through modern slavery.

Modern slavery and forced labor is not as openly or frequently mitigated as other regulatory supply chain risks — such as foreign corrupt practices or conflict minerals, according to Kris Hutton, head of product management at ACL, a Vancouver, B.C.-based global compliance and audit software firm and consultancy.

“Slavery is a much more diverse, complex issue to govern, monitor, detect and regulate.”  — Kris Hutton, head of product management, ACL

And that’s a primary reason why major Western nations like the U.S. and the United Kingdom only recently enacted anti-slavery legislation (2015 in the U.S.), unlike the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) enacted in 1977.

“Based on maturity of legislation alone, jurisdictional regulators, such as the Department of Justice in the U.S., are far more likely to issue punitive fines against abuses of FCPA and Dodd Frank than those of anti-slavery regulations,” Hutton said.

Kris Hutton, head of product management, ACL

Kris Hutton, head of product management, ACL

This focus will change in the future, due to pressure from external social forces — such as consumer protests.

Modern slavery is also much more difficult to detect compared to other crimes, he said.

Corruption involving an electronic trail of payment or expense, for example, can be monitored by the organization and the regulator. Modern slavery, however, has to do with the conditions surrounding the workforce, which often rely more on qualitative evidence such as interviews and observation than documentation.

“Slavery is a much more diverse, complex issue to govern, monitor, detect and regulate,” Hutton said.

Finally, modern slavery carries a more serious social stigma compared to either corruption or conflict minerals.  Many companies look the other way to avoid having to act on the knowledge.

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Hutton expects this will start to change with more social awareness and increased regulatory enforcement; one thing that will drive organizational behavior is a combination of monetary and reputational damage that influences consumers and investors.

“Companies are responsible not only for their own integrity and ethics, but also for acts of their third-party suppliers,” said Scott Lane, CEO at The Red Flag Group, an independent corporate governance and compliance firm in Tempe, Ariz.

“A company that uses suppliers engaged in actions such as forced migrant or child labor, or human trafficking, could sustain significant fines and reputational damage,” he said.

Lane cited the example of Nestlé, which revealed late last year that poor workers from developing countries such as Thailand, Myanmar and Cambodia often ended up trapped in illegal and brutal working conditions as part of the company’s supply chain.

“A company that uses suppliers engaged in actions such as forced migrant or child labor, or human trafficking, could sustain significant fines and reputational damage.”  — Scott Lane, CEO, The Red Flag Group

He added that modern laws place an obligation on companies to assess whether or not it is happening, or could happen, in their supply chain. And if the answer is yes, is it being taken care of?

Finally, they need to report how they are doing in that process.

Scott Lane, CEO, The Red Flag Group

Scott Lane, CEO, The Red Flag Group

“These laws are creating an obligation on companies to do these things,” Lane said. “It’s less about the risk of fines and litigation and more about the reputational damage to the extent you don’t do anything once you find it.”

“It’s safe to say there is not a single company in the world within the Fortune 1000 that knowingly wants to violate these laws,” says Jeff Hunter, a partner in PricewaterhouseCoopers’ U.S. risk assurance services practice.

“With the expansiveness of today’s supply chain, there are much deeper ways to monitor and surveil third-party suppliers,” he said. “In the past, there was word of mouth, trust and the transparency of how they did business before. But that is changing, and the lead companies will have to look deeper into their supply chains.”

Some proactive steps

There are three critical areas that need to be addressed within organizations looking to reduce supply chain risks connected with slave labor, ACL’s Hutton said.

First, organizational leadership and the board need to make it part of their corporate mandate and be committed to educating, training and building awareness.

“One concrete way this is done is by including anti-slavery culture into the Code of Conduct — create policy and training for procurement professionals and enforce it,” he said.

Next is including prevention and detection controls in the supply chain vetting process, not just internally using vendor pre-approval, but by extending the obligations and awareness of the anti-slavery mandate to all vendors.

“Insist on supply chain traceability,” he said. “Make the key indicators of slavery highly visible — age and mobility of the workforce, fair wages (absent of fees or indentures) and working hours, and humane treatment to name a few.”

Point-scoring systems can be created where certain criteria would raise a red flag — such as vendors located in known conflict regions.

Finally, invest in auditing, monitoring and/or investigative measures — hold procurement and risk professionals accountable internally and hold vendors equally accountable.

Provide a whistleblower hotline so grievances can be reported.

As for data, Hutton said, the best angle is to create preventive controls that use a scoring model to indicate a higher risk for slavery. For instance, when a procurement professional wants to buy from a new vendor, the vendor has to be approved.

“If it is in a region that is in an emerging market or is a conflict region, the score should reflect that higher risk,” he said.

It’s still too early to tell if the new laws will have a positive impact on reducing the world’s slave labor market, Hutton said.

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On the one hand, there is much more social awareness and pressure for ethically and socially responsible corporate behavior.

On the other, the global supply chain is complex and it’s not an easy problem to solve by just running a data analytic monitoring program.
“It’s going to take time and it’s going to take pressure from regulators with punitive enforcement around the globe,” he said. “From that perspective, it’s early in the transformation to socially responsible outsourcing and procurement.”

According to Seyfarth Shaw’s Boutros, risk managers should always look for one key indicator when it comes to supply chain purchasing.

“If the price is too good to be true, there probably is a reason for it,” he said. “It’s not necessarily always a red flag, but it certainly needs to be investigated.” &

Tom Starner is a freelance business writer and editor. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Report: Hospitality

Bridging the Protection Gap

When travelers stay home, hospitality companies recoup lost income through customized, data-defined policies.
By: | October 12, 2017 • 9 min read

In the wake of a hurricane, earthquake, pandemic, terror attack, or any event that causes carnage on a grand scale, affected areas usually are subject to a large “protection gap” – the difference between insured loss and total economic loss. Depending on the type of damage, the gap can be enormous, leaving companies and communities scrambling to obtain the funds needed for a quick recovery.

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RMS estimates that Hurricane Harvey’s rampage through Texas could cause as much as $90 billion in total economic damage. The modeling firm also stated that “[National Flood Insurance Program] penetration rates are as low as 20 percent in the Houston area, and thus most of the losses will be uninsured.”

In addition to uninsured losses from physical damage, many businesses in unaffected surrounding areas will suffer non-physical contingent business interruption losses. The hospitality industry is particularly susceptible to this exposure, and its losses often fall into the protection gap.

Natural catastrophes and other major events that compromise travelers’ safety have prolonged impacts on tourism and hospitality. Even if they suffer no physical damage, any hotel or resort will lose business as travelers avoid the area.

“The hospitality industry is reliant on people moving freely. If people don’t feel safe, they won’t travel. And that cuts off the lifeblood of the industry,” said Christian Ryan, U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh.

Christian Ryan
U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh

“People are going away from the devastation, not toward it,” said Evan Glassman, president and CEO, New Paradigm Underwriters.

Drops in revenue resulting from decreased occupancy and average daily room rate can sometimes be difficult to trace back to a major event when a hotel suffered no physical harm. Traditional business interruption policies require physical damage as a coverage condition. Even contingent business interruption coverages might only kick in if a hotel’s direct suppliers were taken offline by physical damage.

If everyone remains untouched and intact, though, it’s near impossible to demonstrate how much of a business downturn was caused by the hurricane three states away.

“Hospitality companies are concerned that their traditional insurance policies only cover business interruption resulting from physical damage,” said Bob Nusslein, head of Innovative Risk Solutions for the Americas, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions.

“These companies have large uninsured exposure from events which do not cause physical damage to their assets, yet result in reduced income.”

Power of Parametrics

Parametric insurance is designed specifically to bridge the protection gap and address historically uninsured or underinsured risks.

Parametric coverage is defined and triggered by the characteristics of an event, rather than characteristics of the loss. Triggers are custom-built based on an insured’s unique location and exposures, as well as their budget and risk tolerance.

“Triggers typically include a combination of the occurrence of a given event and a reduction in occupancy rates or RevPar for the specific hotel assets,” Nusslein said. Though sometimes the parameters of an event — like measures of storm intensity — are enough to trigger a payout on their own.

For hurricane coverage, for example, one policy trigger might be the designation of a Category 3-5 storm within a 100-mile radius of the location. Another trigger might be a 20 percent drop in RevPAR, or revenue per available room. If both parameters are met, a pre-determined payout amount would be administered. No investigations or claims adjustment necessary.

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The same type of coverage could apply in less severe situations where traditional insurance just doesn’t respond. Event or entertainment companies, for example, often operate at the whim of Mother Nature. While they may not be forced to cancel a production due to inclement weather, they will nevertheless take a hit to the bottom line if fewer patrons show up.

Christian Phillips, focus group leader for Beazley’s Weatherguard parametric products, said that as little as a quarter- to a half-inch of rain over a four- to five-hour period is enough to prevent people from coming to an event, or to leave early.

“That’s a persistent rainfall that will wear down people’s patience,” he said.

“A rule of thumb for parametric weather coverage, if you’re looking to protect loss of revenue when your event has not actually been cancelled, you will probably lose up to 20 to 30 percent of your revenue in bad weather. That depends on the client and the type of event, but that’s the standard we’ve realized from historical claims data.”

The industry is now drawing on data to establish these rules of thumb for more serious losses sustained by hospitality companies after major events.

“Until recently the insurance industry has not created products to address these non-physical damage business interruption exposures. The industry is now collaborating with big data companies to access data, which in turn, allows us to structure new products,” Nusslein said.

Data-Driven Triggers

Insurers source data from weather organizations that track temperature, rainfall, wind speeds and snowfall, among other perils, by the hour and sometimes by the minute. Parametric triggers are determined based on historical storm data, which indicates how likely a given location is to be hit.

“We try to get a minimum of 30 years of hourly data for those perils for a given location,” Phillips said.

“Global weather is changing, though, so we focus particularly on the last five to 10 years. From that we can build a policy that fits the exposure that we see in the data, and we use the data to price it correctly.”

New Paradigm Underwriters collects their own wind speed data via a network of anemometers that stretch from Corpus Christi, Texas, all the way to Massachusetts, and works with modeling firms like RMS to gather additional underwriting information.

The hospitality industry is reliant on people moving freely. If people don’t feel safe, they won’t travel. And that cuts off the lifeblood of the industry.– Christian Ryan, U.S. Hospitality and Gaming Practice Leader, Marsh

While severe weather is the most common event of concern, parametric cover can also apply to terrorism and pandemic risks.

“We offer a terror attack quote on every one of our event policies because everyone asks for it,” said Beazley’s Phillips.

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“We didn’t do it 10 years ago, but that’s the world we live in today.”

An attack could lead to civil unrest, fire or any number of things outside an insured’s control. It would likely disrupt travel over a wide geographic region.

“A terrorist event could cause wide area devastation and loss of attraction, which results in lost income for hospitality companies,” Nusslein said.

Disease outbreaks also dampen travel and tourism. Zika, which was most common in South America and the Caribbean, still prevented people from traveling to south Florida.

“Occupancy went down significantly in that region,” Marsh’s Ryan said.

“If there is a pandemic across the U.S., a parametric coverage would make sense. All travel within and inbound to the U.S. would go down, and parametric policies could protect hotel revenues in non-impacted areas. Official statements from the CDC such as evacuation orders or warnings could qualify as a trigger.”

Less data exists around terror attacks and pandemics than for weather, though hotels are taking steps to collect information around their exposure.

“It’s hard to quantify how an infectious disease outbreak will impact business, but we and clients are using big data to track travel patterns,” Ryan said.

Hospitality Metrics

Any data collected has to be verified, or “cleaned.”

“We only deal with entities that will clean the data so we know the historical data we’re getting is accurate,” Phillips said.

“There are mountains of data out there, but it’s unusable if it’s not clean.”

Parametric underwriters also tap into the insured’s historical data around occupancy and room rates to estimate the losses it may suffer from decreased revenue.

Bob Nusslein, head of Innovative Risk Solutions for the Americas, Swiss Re Corporate Solutions.

“The hospitality industry uses two key metrics to measure loss of business income. These include occupancy rate and revenue per available room, or RevPAR. These are the traditional measurements of business health,” Swiss Re’s Nusslein said.  RevPAR is calculated by multiplying a hotel’s average daily room rate (ADR) by its occupancy rate.

“The hotel industry has been contributing its data on occupancy, RevPAR, room supply and demand, and historical data on geographical and seasonal trends to independent data aggregators for many years. It has done an exceptional job of aggregating business data to measure performance downturns from routine economic fluctuations and from major ‘Black Swan’ events, like the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the 2008 financial crisis or the 2009 SARS epidemic.”

Claims history can also provide an understanding of how much revenue a hotel or an event company has lost in the past due to any type of business interruption. Business performance metrics combined with claims data determine an appropriate payout amount.

Like coverage triggers, payouts from parametric policies are specifically defined and pre-determined based on data and statistical evidence.

This is the key benefit of parametric coverage: triggers are hit, payment is made. With minimal or no adjustment process, claims are paid quickly, enabling insureds to begin recovery immediately.

Applying Parametric Payments

For hotels with no physical damage, but significant drops in occupancy and revenue, funds from a parametric policy can help bridge the income gap until business picks up again, covering expenses related to regular maintenance, utilities and marketing.

Because payment is not tied to a specific type or level of loss, it can be applied wherever insureds need it, so long as it doesn’t advance them to a better financial position than they enjoyed prior to the loss.

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Parametric policies can be designed to fill in where an insured has not yet met their deductible on a separate traditional policy. Or it could function as excess coverage. Or it could cover exposures excluded by other policies, or for which there is no insurance option at all. Completely bespoke, parametric coverages are a function of each client’s individual exposures, risk tolerance and budget.

“Parametric insurance enables underwriting of risks that are outside tolerance levels from a traditional standpoint,” NPU’s Glassman said.

The non-physical business interruption risks faced by the hospitality industry match that description pretty closely.

“Hotels are a good fit for parametric insurance because they have a guaranteed loss from a business income standpoint when there is a major storm coming,” Glassman said.

While only a handful of carriers currently offer a form of parametric coverage, the abundance of available data and advancement in data collection and analytical tools will likely fuel its popularity.

Companies can maximize the benefits of parametric coverages by building them as supplements to traditional business interruption or event cancellation policies. Both New Paradigm Underwriters and Beazley either work with other property insurers or create hybrid products in-house to combine the best of both worlds and assemble a comprehensive risk transfer solution. &

Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]