Risk Insider: Nir Kossovsky

Schooling the NFL in Reputation Management

By: | September 23, 2014 • 3 min read
Nir Kossovsky is the Chief Executive Officer of Steel City Re. He has been developing solutions for measuring, managing, monetizing, and transferring risks to intangible assets since 1997. He is also a published author, and can be reached at [email protected]

Back in the dark ages before the Internet, players on the gridiron were expected to play brutally hard for fans who sat through sometimes equally brutal weather.

Advertisers targeted the demographic with beer and pickup trucks, and paid enough for the privilege to enrich television networks, team owners and the tax-exempt league organization.

Football was entertainment for many, and a religion for many more. Winning was everything — a cultural obsession that over time sustained a range of abusive practices.

In 2009, Eric Olson, senior vice president at BSR, a social responsibility consultancy, warned that “hyper-transparency” enabled by the Internet would change the boundaries used to assess a company’s scope of control, and its degree of accountability and responsibility.

Football’s first major media sensation along these lines was the 2011 Penn State football coach child sex abuse scandal. It was a warning shot for the professional league. In rapid succession, stakeholders have made it clear to the NFL that the intangibles of quality, safety, and ethics on and off the field must now be intrinsic to the sport.

Two years ago, after labor issues simmered all summer between the league and its referees, a Monday night game between Seattle and Green Bay was marred by a disputed touchdown call by substitute referees.

Fans were livid. Vikings punter Chris Kluwe wrote that the NFL’s reputation “is tarnishing faster than a sailor’s virtue in a two-dollar whorehouse.”

“These refs are not fit to stand in for the men you’ve locked out for what is increasingly looking like nothing more than simple greed—attempting to squeeze blood from a stone simply because you can,” Kluwe wrote to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in an open letter.

In rapid succession, stakeholders have made it clear to the NFL that the intangibles of quality, safety, and ethics on and off the field must now be intrinsic to the sport.

Last year, the NFL agreed to pay $765 million to settle hundreds of cases accusing it of hiding information about the dangers of concussions, naively hoping that fans would refocus on the players and the games that make the sport a national obsession.

But to the NFL’s stakeholders, the game no longer exists in a vacuum.

The current reputation scandal centers on domestic violence. Stories and videos of beatings are illustrating graphically the meaning of hyper-transparency. Hannah Storm, anchor of ESPN’s SportsCenter, closed her review of the weekend NFL games in September by questioning if the league she enjoys actually cares about female fans, families, or the issue of domestic violence.

“What exactly does the NFL stand for?” she asked rhetorically at the end of the Monday morning program.

Storm could have been channeling The Walt Disney Company, which owns ESPN. In the age of hyper-transparency, stakeholder expectations have never been higher, and tolerance for errors has never been lower – disappoint them and they will punish you.

In the entertainment business Disney know so well, managing reputation is a business imperative.

Read all of Nir Kossovsky’s Risk Insider contributions.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

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Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

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John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]