Risk Insider: Nir Kossovsky

Schooling the NFL in Reputation Management

By: | September 23, 2014 • 3 min read
Nir Kossovsky is the Chief Executive Officer of Steel City Re. He has been developing solutions for measuring, managing, monetizing, and transferring risks to intangible assets since 1997. He is also a published author, and can be reached at [email protected]

Back in the dark ages before the Internet, players on the gridiron were expected to play brutally hard for fans who sat through sometimes equally brutal weather.

Advertisers targeted the demographic with beer and pickup trucks, and paid enough for the privilege to enrich television networks, team owners and the tax-exempt league organization.

Football was entertainment for many, and a religion for many more. Winning was everything — a cultural obsession that over time sustained a range of abusive practices.

In 2009, Eric Olson, senior vice president at BSR, a social responsibility consultancy, warned that “hyper-transparency” enabled by the Internet would change the boundaries used to assess a company’s scope of control, and its degree of accountability and responsibility.

Football’s first major media sensation along these lines was the 2011 Penn State football coach child sex abuse scandal. It was a warning shot for the professional league. In rapid succession, stakeholders have made it clear to the NFL that the intangibles of quality, safety, and ethics on and off the field must now be intrinsic to the sport.

Two years ago, after labor issues simmered all summer between the league and its referees, a Monday night game between Seattle and Green Bay was marred by a disputed touchdown call by substitute referees.

Fans were livid. Vikings punter Chris Kluwe wrote that the NFL’s reputation “is tarnishing faster than a sailor’s virtue in a two-dollar whorehouse.”

“These refs are not fit to stand in for the men you’ve locked out for what is increasingly looking like nothing more than simple greed—attempting to squeeze blood from a stone simply because you can,” Kluwe wrote to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell in an open letter.

In rapid succession, stakeholders have made it clear to the NFL that the intangibles of quality, safety, and ethics on and off the field must now be intrinsic to the sport.

Last year, the NFL agreed to pay $765 million to settle hundreds of cases accusing it of hiding information about the dangers of concussions, naively hoping that fans would refocus on the players and the games that make the sport a national obsession.

But to the NFL’s stakeholders, the game no longer exists in a vacuum.

The current reputation scandal centers on domestic violence. Stories and videos of beatings are illustrating graphically the meaning of hyper-transparency. Hannah Storm, anchor of ESPN’s SportsCenter, closed her review of the weekend NFL games in September by questioning if the league she enjoys actually cares about female fans, families, or the issue of domestic violence.

“What exactly does the NFL stand for?” she asked rhetorically at the end of the Monday morning program.

Storm could have been channeling The Walt Disney Company, which owns ESPN. In the age of hyper-transparency, stakeholder expectations have never been higher, and tolerance for errors has never been lower – disappoint them and they will punish you.

In the entertainment business Disney know so well, managing reputation is a business imperative.

Read all of Nir Kossovsky’s Risk Insider contributions.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]