Resiliency Efforts

Risks Without Boundaries

Public and private sector experts are planning resiliency efforts to combat potential disaster losses and the problem of underinsurance.
By: | October 27, 2016 • 3 min read

Representatives from the private and public sector met with policymakers and members of the insurance industry in October to discuss ways to build greater resilience in cities.

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“We have an opportunity to start planning now,” said former N.J. Gov. Christine Todd Whitman during “Cities in the Crosshairs: The Case for Investing in Resilience,” presented by Lloyd’s of London in partnership with the American Security Project, a nonpartisan national security think-tank.

“We must build more resilient systems because we know these impacts are coming,” said Whitman, who is board chairman of the American Security Project and a past administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency.

“We desperately need the private sector; this needs to be a collaborative approach.”

The participants at the New York conference discussed best practices in risk assessment, mitigation, adaptation and risk transfer.

The panel discussion included, from left, Kathleen Hamm, counselor to the deputy secretary at the U.S. Department of Treasury; Lloyd’s CEO Inga Beale; and former N.J. Gov. Christine Todd Whitman

The panel discussion included, from left, Kathleen Hamm, counselor to the deputy secretary at the U.S. Department of Treasury; Lloyd’s CEO Inga Beale; and former N.J. Gov. Christine Todd Whitman

The event comes on the heels of the release of Lloyd’s “City Risk Index,” it’s first-ever analysis of the potential impact of 18 catastrophic threats on the gross domestic product of 301 major international cities. The index uses a metric Lloyd’s calls [email protected] to quantify potential losses from threats to a location’s projected 10-year economic output.

“Our risk list shows how much the risk landscape is changing,” said Lloyd’s CEO Inga Beale, who said the report is a “wake-up call to us all.”

“Now the world is so much more about intangible risks,” she said.

“We need to innovate our products to this ever changing world.”

Just 10 threats account for 91 percent of the Total [email protected], according to Lloyd’s research, which was done in collaboration with University of Cambridge.

Nearly half are man-made, including market crash, cyber attack, power outage and nuclear accident.

“A lot of risks used to be geographically bounded,” Beale said.

“Now, with cyber and climate change, it is without boundaries.”

Market crash leads the list by a wide margin, with pandemic, windstorm, earthquake and flood rounding out the Top 5. Oil price shock, terrorism, drought, heat waves, tsunami and volcanos ares some of the other more costly disasters.

New York, and Los Angeles ranked No. 5 and 6, respectively, on the list of cities with high-asset values that are most financially exposed to disaster. Also high on the list were Taipei, Tokyo, Seoul, Manila, Istanbul, Osaka, Hong Kong and Shanghai.

Dense population coupled with climate warming and new technology contributes to higher damages associated with natural disasters.

“There are more people living in the cities than at any time in history,” said panel leader Dante Disparte, founder and CEO of risk and capital management firm Risk Cooperative.

Population density coupled with climate change and new technology contributes to higher damages associated with natural disasters. Meanwhile, the gap between what the insurance industry pays to cover a catastrophe compared with the actual clean-up cost is widening.

That insurance gap continues to be an elusive goal for the insurance industry at the moment, said Fielding L. Norton, deputy chief enterprise risk officer of XL Catlin.

The insurance gap “is a missed opportunity for my industry to be relevant and to help businesses and communities to get back on their feet in the aftermath of a disaster,” Norton said.

He said his company is working to anticipate catastrophes and devise innovative products to address them.

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XL Catlin recently devised several programs to reach underinsured areas, and is one of eight participants in Lloyd’s newly created disaster risk facility. The facility involves syndicates cooperatively developing solutions to help developing economies tackle underinsurance and improve their resilience.

“One of the most important things we do for our company and for our clients is to not fail to imagine the things that are possible,” Norton said.

“Failure of imagination is a phrase we use all the time in our enterprise risk management group.”

“Lloyd’s has always been at the forefront of taking new risks,” Beale said.

“We’ve been very much underwriting alongside human progress for centuries and we must continue to do this.”

Juliann Walsh is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

Risk Management

The Profession

Mohegan Gaming’s director of risk management recognizes the value of the people around her in creating success.  
By: | February 20, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a margin clerk in financial futures at Kidder Peabody & Company.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While I was at General Dynamics working in HR, the opportunity to transition to risk management was afforded to me. I was very fortunate that the risk manager at the time took a chance on me and taught me so very much. Coming from a manufacturing facility with multiple unions helped prepare me for any situation.

R&I: How has your experience in human resources helped your career in risk management? What do the positions have in common?

I believe my HR background has helped my risk management career immensely. Both areas are interrelated. People are fundamental to accomplishing goals and people can help or hinder those results. Human resources is tasked with bringing in and nurturing the right people, and risk management is tasked with keeping them safe.

Mary Lou Morrissette, corporate director of risk management, Mohegan Gaming & Entertainment

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Education, keeping up with industry trends and having resources available to better prepare organizations. There is always something new or a new way to view a situation.

R&I: What kind of resources can risk managers bring to the table?

Data and analytics have come so far, and the systems out there are able to drill down into good quality information that can be used more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Within the community, we all understand the role of risk management, but getting organizations to understand the importance of considering risk during the strategic decision-making process as opposed to treating it like an after-thought can be a challenge. Risk should be involved in day-to-day operations — not just when a problem arises.

R&I: What was the best location for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego. The proximity to the city, community and culture was great.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The emergence of cyber security.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Catastrophic events, both natural and manmade, are becoming more of a norm of late. We need to look at analytics and the role they play in understanding these disasters and subsequent losses to help organizations prepare, manage and recover from these types of events.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

We have always valued relationships. We have a few long-standing partners that immediately come to mind. FM Global, Great American and Safety National have all been immensely important to our company and our growth.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

All through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

If you have trust and faith in your broker and they have full disclosure, then yes, it is overblown. But I have seen the cost of hidden commissions and the effect on the bottom line.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I had a mentor early on in my career in HR, Marie Haggerty. She instilled in me the mindset to speak up and be heard and not to shy away from an adverse opinion but to be strong in my convictions.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being awarded FM Global’s Highly Protected Risk award in 2011. The award is granted when a location has no human element recommendations, no uncontrolled high-risk exposures and no other major loss exposures. Mohegan Sun has worked hand-in-hand with FM since 2000 on loss prevention recommendations and improvements. Our engineering team as well as our fire department have been instrumental in our ability to achieve this award. We have always tried to meet or exceed the advice we receive from FM’s engineers. This has made our property better protected as well as helped to keep our premium in line.

R&I: How many e-mails do you get in a day?

Too many!

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I only read nonfiction and personal development books. Katie Couric’s “The Best Advice I Ever Got: Lessons from Extraordinary Lives” is one of my favorites.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Coffee and water.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Pearl Harbor memorial. I love history and to stand over the Arizona was humbling.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Parasailing.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

That I can make a difference in either a safer workplace or on the bottom line, and that every day is different. I love the diversity of what I do and the constant change and ability to continue to grow and learn.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I definitely get the deer in the headlights look when I tell people what I do — I don’t think any of my family or friends truly understand it.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]