Risk Insider: Elizabeth Carmichael

Risk Management Is the Natural Owner of Compliance

By: | August 20, 2014 • 2 min read
Elizabeth Carmichael is president of Carmichael Associates LLC. She formerly was director of compliance and risk management for Five Colleges Inc. She can be reached at [email protected]

With the adoption of Enterprise Risk Management (ERM), many organizations have already begun to include compliance risks as part of their organization’s risk management portfolio. However, even if the organization has not yet climbed aboard the ERM bandwagon, risk managers should be actively supporting, if not directing, their organization’s compliance efforts in several key areas, namely, interdepartmental risks.

After all, the compliance challenges in most organizations will not be those that land neatly in one department. Dining services managers will be on top of sanitation regulations; comptrollers will file their taxes.

No, the greatest compliance challenges are those that cross division and department lines.

Take a look at some of the compliance requirements that prove challenging to institutions of higher education.

Title IX: Which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, covers not only equity in sports but also sexual assault and misconduct. Consequently, this impacts nearly every division of the institution.

Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA): Its related laws and regulations impact academics, student life, facilities, IT, human resources, admissions, athletics  and a multitude of other departments.

Export Controls: A mishmash of laws that similarly effects any department involved with academics, research, technology, and travel.

Records Retention Policy: Required under the tax form 990, covers every division and department and has additional privacy and security implications.

“…the compliance challenges in most organizations will not be those that land neatly in one department.”

Institutions traditionally find it difficult to manage compliance requirements such as these because there is no natural “owner” of the requirement. It is here that risk managers are ideally situated to help their institutions by gathering together individuals from the affected departments into a committee or task force.

Together, they can begin to create a shared management process for the institution. In the absence of hierarchical authority, committees and task forces can wield significant influence, especially if appointed by the president or board.

Furthermore, many compliance requirements are a natural fit within a risk management portfolio because they address insured risks. Compliance with anti-discrimination laws (like Title IX and ADA) is a perfect example, as acts of discrimination may be insured through educators’ or employers’ legal liability policies.

Other compliance matters may directly affect the essential identity of the institution. For instance, if an institution violates the regulations on political speech, it could lose its non-profit status and suffer reputational damages.

While it is impractical for a risk manager to be on top of every regulation that an institution is required to be in compliance with (they number in the hundreds) it is important that the risk manager be a leader in compliance matters that, when not addressed, can directly impact insurance and claims.

Offer to help organize a compliance effort. Make sure to (successfully) follow though.

You don’t have to be a subject expert to do this! Your results can showcase risk management services in the institution, reduce risk, and create a template for your next compliance project.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

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Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

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John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]