Medical Management

No Consensus on Treatment

Experts disagree on the involvement of risk managers in implementing treatment guidelines for injured workers.
By: | March 3, 2017 • 7 min read

Even as the nation’s 50 states inch towards consistency in medical treatment guidelines for workers’ compensation injuries, there is no consensus on the role of risk managers in enforcing them.

Dr. Robert Goldberg, chief medical officer, Healthesystems, a national workers’ compensation benefits management provider, said risk managers should delegate oversight of treatment guidelines and compliance to those for whom it is a core competency.

“Why should risk managers know anything about treatment guidelines?” he asked.

“Management of care is in the capable hands of physicians, nurse case managers, insurers, TPAs (third-party administrators) and utilization review (UR) organizations.”

Anne Kirby, chief compliance officer and vice president of care management, Rising Medical Solutions

Anne Kirby, chief compliance officer and vice president of care management, Rising Medical Solutions, said it’s impractical for risk managers, with their myriad tasks, to also take on micromanagement of thousands of pages of treatment guidelines.

For example, ODG’s treatment guidelines — the most widely used — include 46 pages related to opiod usage.

“It’s too much for any single risk manager to know.” Instead, she advised risk managers to “do due diligence on the UR company.”

Ettie Schoor, president, Prism Consultants, said, however, that risk managers shouldn’t offload responsibility for enforcement onto their TPAs or carriers because of the risk of errors. She noted that TPAs have a lot of turnover, carriers are always hiring new adjusters, and both have very high caseloads.

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2017 Power Broker® Dennis Tierney,  a senior vice president in Marsh’s claim practice, said that risk managers should “have some familiarity” with guidelines for the body parts where their exposures are highest, as well as rely on the expertise of their TPA, carrier and broker claims consultant partners.

“Should risk managers be aware of guidelines?” asked Mary O’Donoghue, chief clinical and product officer, MedRisk. “Absolutely. Should they expect TPAs to administer medical review appropriately? Absolutely.”

She advised risk managers to focus their attention on unusually long, complex and expensive claims.

Many states and a few Canadian provinces have adopted, adapted or developed medical, surgical, therapeutic and pharmaceutical treatment guidelines for a number of workers’ compensation maladies.

The most common claims, according to The National Law Review, are strains and sprains (30 percent), cuts or punctures (19 percent), contusions (12 percent), inflammation (5 percent) and fractures (5 percent).

Do Treatment Guidelines Work?

The cautious consensus is that, overall, treatment guidelines usually work.

“In states where care is managed and guided using excellent guidelines and strong utilization, workplace injuries may be handled at a higher level of care with a higher expectation of recovery,” said Goldberg.

And in states with limited or no guidelines, “injuries may linger and lead to longer disability, higher indemnity payments and loss of return-to-work,” he said.

The extensiveness of treatment guidelines make it “too much for any single risk manager to know.” — Anne Kirby, chief compliance officer and vice president of care management, Rising Medical Solutions

ODG points to statistics proving the effectiveness of guidelines.

States that adopted ODG guidelines, its website claimed, reported medical cost savings of 25 percent to 60 percent, average disability duration reduced from 34 percent to 66 percent, treatment delays from date of injury to initial treatment reduced 77 percent and insurance premiums reduced by 40 percent to 49 percent.

Only 13 states have no guidelines or none under consideration by the state legislatures, according to ODG.

Phil LeFevre, managing director, ODG, draws a bright line separating consensus-based guidelines characteristic to states that develop their own, and evidence-based guidelines “developed from comprehensive review of the medical literature, ranking and weighting thousands of studies based on design and quality, and tested for 15 years for optimal outcomes.”

A few states’ guidelines are mandatory — California and New York require compliance for certain injuries to most body parts, for example — but most are “guiderails” to keep treatment on track, said Goldberg of Healthesystems.

Some states adopt ODG and American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) guidelines, others develop their own, and yet others borrow from all of the above.

“Treatment guidelines give workers what they need, not what they want,” said Schoor. That brings a much-needed halt to excessive treatments that jack up medical and indemnity costs, she said.

Complex Cases Challenge Guidelines

Actual medical outcomes and return-to-work rates fall short of the promise of treatment guidelines, wrote Michael Gruber, partner, Pasternack Tilker Ziegler Walsh Stanton & Romano, LLP, a New York workers’ compensation law firm.

“ ‘Cookbook’ treatment rules effectively tie the hands of medical providers by not allowing them to use their judgment as to what treatment would be most beneficial for their patients,” he wrote in a newsletter for the American Association for Justice.

Most treatment guidelines are “pretty good” at predicting the medical treatment and return-to-work date of average claims, said Dr. Brian O’Malley, president, The Rehab Center in Charlotte, N.C., which treats complex worker injuries.

They’re not as good at guiding treatment for the outlying cases, which usually account for the largest expenditures, O’Malley said. “Guidelines may have a myopic view of an injury.”

For example, he said, most workers with a lumbar strain will return to work within 30 days. What happens to those who don’t?

“Decompression in the spine, spinal fusion, the condition deteriorates. The patient gets a spinal cord stimulator” — a highly dubious medical treatment in the workers’ compensation population, O’Malley said.

“Those end up costing the most money.”

Even with those lumbar strains that don’t lead to surgery, complex symptoms may follow: disturbed sleep due to pain, weight gain from inactivity, anxiety from disrupted routine and depression from isolation.

“It goes on and on,” O’Malley said.

“Many injuries need involvement by more than a spine specialist,” he said, including the emotional piece. Not all states compensate for mental health services.

Risk managers should “have some familiarity with guidelines for the body parts where their exposures are highest.” — Dennis Tierney, senior vice president and director, workers’ compensation, Marsh claim practice

Denied treatment prompts some injured workers to file claims under their private insurance or to pay for treatment out of pocket, Gruber wrote.

On the contrary, said Goldberg, the workers’ comp system is more prone to excessive care than denial of treatment.

Guidelines are designed to be flexible, permitting discretion for the treating physician, with room to file an appeal for denied treatment, said LeFevre.

Dennis Tierney, senior vice president and director, workers’ compensation, Marsh claim practice

Despite the good intentions behind guidelines, implementation can go awry, said Bernie Baltaxe, partner, Smith & Baltaxe, LLP, which specializes in workers’ compensation cases.

For example, a case now in the California Supreme Court alleges a UR doctor’s decision to decertify the sedative Klonopin in accordance with treatment guidelines led to seizures and additional injury. Klonopin was prescribed for anxiety related to a back injury.

Most guidelines are not mandatory, said Dr. Robert Hall, corporate medical director, workers’ comp division of Optum, but establish a starting point for treatment.

“If the current treatment plan isn’t working, there may be a good reason to deviate.”

If evidence points irrefutably to the optimal type and length of treatment for, say, a rotator cuff injury, why aren’t treatment guidelines the same across the country?

Inconsistent State Guidelines

“It boils down to the character of the state,” said Brian Allen, vice president, government affairs, workers’ comp division of Optum. “The handful of states that defer to market solutions tend to target specific conditions.”

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Some years ago, for example, “every time you turned around in Montana you saw another back surgery,” which is highly controversial because of cost and efficacy. Treatment guidelines brought the number down 70 percent.

States that seek solutions from regulations, such as Massachusetts, have “sweeping guidelines covering a gamut of treatments.”

The lack of uniformity inhibits consistent medical care, said O’Donoghue of MedRisk.

“Treatment guidelines give workers what they need, not what they want.” — Ettie Schoor, president, Prism Consultants

“Some states have a presumption of treatment” rather than mandatory protocols, said Tron Emptage, chief clinical officer, workers’ comp division of Optum, which can be the deciding factor in a dispute over compensability between the payer and treating physician.

“If the doctor presents evidence for deviation from the guidelines, generally the payer will help determine coverage for the expense under the claim,” Emptage said.

Different states have different recommendations for treating lower back pain, which accounts for one-third of occupational musculoskeletal injuries and illnesses resulting in work disability, according to the Department of Labor.

“Some doctors order an x-ray at the first visit,” said Hall of Optum. Without accompanying red flags, such as fever or weight loss indicating a more severe underlying condition, “imaging has low value because the worker hasn’t had a chance to heal. Guidelines can keep the treatment on track.” &

Susannah Levine writes about health care, education and technology. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

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R&I Profile

Achieving Balance

XL Catlin’s Denise Balan stays calm and focused when faced with crisis.
By: | January 10, 2018 • 6 min read

In the high-stress scenario of kidnap or ransom, the first image that comes to mind isn’t necessarily a yoga mat — at least, not for most.

But Denise Balan, senior VP and head of U.S. kidnap & ransom, XL Catlin, who practices yoga every day, would swear by it.

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“I looked at these opposing aspects of my life,” she said. “Yoga is about focus, balance, clarity of intent. In a moment of stress, how do you respond? The more clarity and calmness you maintain, the better positioned you are to provide assistance in moments of crisis.

“Nobody wants to be speaking to a frenetic person when either dealing with a dangerous situation or planning for prevention of a situation,” she added.

“There’s a poem by [Rudyard] Kipling on that,” added Balan’s colleague Ben Tucker. “What it boils down to is: If you can remain calm, you can manage through a crisis a lot better.”

Tucker, who works side by side with Balan as head of U.S. terrorism and political violence, XL Catlin, has seen how yoga influences his colleague.

“The way Denise interacts with stakeholders in this process — she is very professional and calm in the approach she takes.”

Yin and Yang

Sometimes seemingly opposite or contrary forces may actually be complementary and interconnected. In Balan’s life, yoga and K&R have become her yin and yang.

She entered the insurance world after earning a juris doctor degree and practicing law for a few years. The switch came, she said, when Balan realized she wasn’t enjoying her time as a commercial litigator.

Denise Balan, senior VP and head of U.S. kidnap & ransom, XL Catlin

In her new role, she was able to use her legal background to manage litigation at AIG, where her transition from law to insurance took place. She started her insurance career in the environmental sector.

In a chance meeting in 2007, Balan met with crisis management underwriters who told her about kidnap and ransom products.

She was hooked.

Because of her background in yoga, Balan liked the crisis management side of the job. Being able to bring the calmness and clearness of intent she practiced during yoga into assisting clients in planning for crisis management piqued her interest.

She then joined XL Catlin in July 2013, where she built the K&R team.

As she became more immersed in her field, Balan began to notice something: The principles she learned in yoga were the same principles ex-military and ex-law enforcement practiced when called to a K&R-related crisis.

She said, “They have a warrior mentality — focus, purpose, strength and logic — and I would say yoga is quite similar in discipline.”

“K&R responders have a warrior mentality — focus, purpose, strength and logic — and I would say yoga is quite similar in discipline.” — Denise Balan, senior VP and head of U.S. kidnap & ransom, XL Catlin

Many understand yoga to be, in itself, one type of meditation, but yoga actually encompasses a group of physical, mental and spiritual practices. Each is a discipline. Some forms of yoga focus on movement and breathing, others focus on posture and technique. Some yoga is meant to relax the mind and create a sense of calmness; other yoga types make participants sweat.

After having her second child and working full-time, Balan wanted to find something physical and relaxing for herself; a friend suggested yoga. During her first lesson, Balan said she was enamored with it.

“I felt like I’d done it all my life.”

She dove into the philosophy of yoga, adopting the practice into her daily routine. Every morning, whether Balan is in her Long Island home or on a business trip, she pulls out her yoga mat to practice.

“I always travel with my mat,” she said. “Daily practice is the simplest form of connection to routine to maintain my balance — physically and mentally.”

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She said the strangest place she has ever practiced was in Lisbon. She was on a very narrow balcony with a bird feeder swarming with sparrows overhead.

After years of studying and practicing, Balan is considered a yogi — someone who is highly proficient in yoga. She attends annual retreats with her yoga group, where she is able to rejuvenate, ready to tackle any K&R event when she returns.

In 2016, Balan visited Tuscany, Italy, where she learned the practice of yoga nidra, a very deep form of meditation. It’s described as the “going-to-sleep stage” — a type of yoga that brings participants to a state of consciousness between waking and sleeping.

“It awakens a different part of your brain,” Balan commented. “Orally describing it doesn’t quite do it justice. One has to practice Nidra to fully understand the effect it has on your being.”

Keeping a level head during a crisis is key in their line of business, Tucker said. He can attest to the benefit of having a yogi on board.

“I’ve seen her run table-top exercises where there is this group of people in a room and they run an exercise, a simulation of a kidnap incident. Denise is very committed to what we’re doing,” said Tucker.

“She brings that energy. She doesn’t get flustered by much.”

Building a K&R Program

When Balan joined XL Catlin, she was tasked with creating the K&R team.

Balan during a retreat in Sicily, Italy, 2017

She spent time researching and analyzing what clients would want in their K&R coverage. What stuck out most to Balan was the fact that, in these situations, the decision to purchase kidnap and ransom cover is rarely made because of desire for reimbursement of money.

“I asked why people buy this type of coverage. The answer was for the security responders,” she said.

“These are the people who sit with the family. They’re similar to psychologists or priests,” Balan further explained. “Corporations can afford to pay ransom. They buy [K&R] because it gives them access to these trained and dedicated professionals who not only provide negotiation advice, but actually sit with a victim’s family, engaging deep levels of emotional investment.”

“I’ve learned to appreciate all moments in life — one at a time. The ability to think clearly and calmly guides my work, my practice and my personal life.” — Denise Balan, senior VP and head of U.S. kidnap & ransom, XL Catlin

Balan described these responders as people having total clarity of purpose, setting their intentions to resolve a crisis — a practice at the very heart of yoga. She knew XL Catlin’s new kidnap program would put stock in their responders.

“I’ve worked closely with the responders to better understand what they can do for our clientele. These are the people who run into danger — warrior hearts married to dedication to our clients’ best interests.”

But K&R is more than fast-paced crisis and quick thinking; Balan also spent a good deal of time writing the K&R form and getting the company’s resources in order. This was a huge task to tackle when creating the program from the ground up.

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“A lot of my day-to-day is speaking with brokers and finding ways to enhance our product,” she said.

After a few months, she was able to hire the company’s first K&R underwriter. From there, the program has grown. It’s left her feeling professionally rewarded.

“People don’t often get that opportunity to build something up from scratch,” she said. “It’s been an amazing experience — rewarding and fun.”

“She brings groups of people together,” said Tucker. “She’s created a positive environment.”

Balan’s yogi nature extends beyond the office walls, too. Her pride and joy, she said, are her kids. And while it may seem like two large parts of her life are opposite in nature, Balan’s achieved balance through her passions.

“[Yoga] has given me the ability to see beyond only one aspect of any situation” she said. “I’ve learned to appreciate all moments in life — one at a time. The ability to think clearly and calmly guides my work, my practice and my personal life.” &

Autumn Heisler is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]