Brokers

Getting There Faster

Brokers use social media and other digital channels to grow their businesses.
By: | March 3, 2014 • 8 min read

It has been an uphill climb for the insurance industry to incorporate faster and more efficient technology into its systems. And perhaps no segment of the industry is under more pressure to get this challenge right than agents and brokers.

“What we are finding out is that brokers, agents, wholesalers and insurers are all in this race to utilize technology better,” said Kabir Syed, CEO of Greenwich, Conn.-based RiskMatch.

But Syed said the different sectors are too siloed.

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“Our industry is not very efficient at integrating multiple systems together,” said Syed, who was managing director, strategy and operations for Marsh’s U.S. global risk management business prior to launching RiskMatch two years ago.
RiskMatch was founded as an analytics firm delivering a suite of web-based solutions for insurance brokers and underwriters throughout the United States.

The brokerages, as hard as they are working to get it right, agree that their industry in general is not a leader in the area of using technology to serve customers.

“At a high level, this industry has lagged behind other industries that are more data and information rich in realizing some of the technology opportunities,” said Patrick Donnelly, the Chicago-based chief broking officer of the Financial Services and Professional Group at Aon Risk Solutions.

Cyber Shopping

Certain sectors of the industry have found it easier to keep pace with technology. Many small businesses are now able to buy their commercial insurance direct online. It was probably only a matter of time — personal lines such as auto have been sold directly for many years.

“Small business owners in particular are more savvy. They understand their business better than anyone.”

— Tom Kavanaugh, partner, PricewaterhouseCoopers

“We’re seeing more of a propensity, especially in small commercial businesses, for a willingness not only to shop around more but to use a direct channel versus historically what was much more driven by agent and broker activity,” said Tom Kavanaugh, Chicago-based partner, Financial Services Practice at PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). “Small commercial is beginning to act more and more like individual consumers.”

Overall, there’s much more information available online and through digital channels, and financial IQs are growing, so there’s more willingness to have a more self-directed shopping experience than in the past, Kavanaugh said.

“You’re beginning to see more and more activity, particularly at the early stages of the process in terms of the research component,” said Kavanaugh.
“Small business owners in particular are more savvy. They understand their business better than anyone,” he said.

Hiscox USA was the U.S. pioneer in direct online sales of insurance policies to business. New York-based Kevin Kerridge, the company’s head of small business insurance set up and ran Hiscox’s direct-to-business operation in the U.K. for 10 years before taking on the challenge of establishing a similar enterprise in the United States in 2010.

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“Ninety percent of the policies we sell through our online service are first-time buyers of business insurance,” said Kerridge. “And I know the reason for that. If you’re a small business and suddenly you figure out you need, say, errors and omissions coverage or general liability, today most of these people are so plugged into online technology that the first thing they’ll do is Google the subject rather than go through an agent who does their car or their home insurance.”

Half of Hiscox USA’s first-time business goes through a digital channel without touching a human being, Kerridge said.

“Within 20 minutes, they get their policy document online. Through other channels, that could take a week to accomplish,” he noted.

Google is obviously key for Kerridge’s business. “We want to be highly rated on natural search rather than through ads. Anybody can buy an ad,” he said.

But agents aren’t excluded from this approach, far from it.

In the last year, Kerridge said, his firm has started to leverage its direct sales technology by giving agents instant access to the same products consumers can buy on its website.

“Outside agents are selling hundreds of Hiscox policies each week through Hiscox online wholesale portals,” he said.

The Social Channel

Social media is another area where some brokers are getting it right.

Just last month, Risk & Insurance® gave a Power Broker® award to Denton Christner, a vice president with BayRisk Insurance Brokers, who founded insuremyfoodtruck.com in mid-2012.

Nine months into 2013, the site had more than 7,000 unique visitors. The site receives between 60 and 125 quote requests per month and is serving 400 mobile food vendors in multiple states, he said.

Christner connects with his customers via social media outlets such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to get to know them personally and find out more about their businesses.

“Social media is a way to build word of mouth, to capitalize on positive reviews from people who have used us.”

— Kevin Kerridge, head of small business insurance, Hiscox.

Some carriers are also employing social media to bolster their marketing efforts.

“Social media is a way to build word of mouth, to capitalize on positive reviews from people who have used us,” said Hiscox USA’s Kerridge.

“I have a dedicated social media person on my team. We took a gamble early on with social media — Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn — to monitor and influence conversations about our company and our products.”

Education and Branding

Added PwC’s Kavanaugh, “You’re seeing agents leverage technology more and more across the entire customer lifecycle. You’re seeing agents use social media platforms for prospecting and customer acquisition.”

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Sites like YouTube are being utilized for different educational components, Kavanaugh added.

“Certainly, the individual branding component comes into play in a big way and you’re even seeing agents using quick-quote or direct-quote functionality on their individual websites in order to cater to people going further and further into the shopping process.”

At Aon, gathering social media data is part of a multi-channel marketing strategy, said Donnelly.

“This campaign will also include some traditional media channels —some of the industry publications, there might even be some broadcast and there could also be trade events included,” he said.

“The beauty of a multi-platform approach is that we can track engagement with prospects across all those channels, with the goal of converting that client or prospect with a solution that is tailored to them,” Donnelly added.

Putting Big Data to Work

Big brokers are going after bigger clients and have been investing for years to get there.

The Aon Global Risk Insight Program (GRIP) employs an automated approach to serving clients around the world.

The platform was developed in 2008 to aggregate and analyze Aon’s insurance placement activity, from submissions to quotes to binding.

The tool allows Aon brokers to tap into the universe of GRIP placement data to benchmark clients against their peers with respect to limits, exposures, premium spend and rate, said Donnelly.

It also enables Aon brokers to select specific views of marketplace developments such as pricing trends and forecasts and carrier quoting behavior.

With a team of 100 colleagues, the Aon Centre for Innovations and Analytics, based in Dublin, analyzes millions of data points captured by Aon GRIP to help clients make more informed strategic decisions related to risk and insurance, said New York-based Robert Stein, U.S. middle market chief broking officer with Aon Risk Solutions.

“By capturing information about the broking process as it is unfolding, Aon arrives at early insights into developing trends,” Stein said.

At the same time Aon is pushing hard on the technology front, however, Stein underscored that the industry should not lose sight of the human side of the business.

“I think it’s important to note that brokerage is a people business, but while there’s no substitute for strong personal relationships, our goal is to make our products more business-minded so we can make more fact-based decisions that allow us to problem solve in a better way,” Stein said.

In Chicago, Ted Devine, former president of Aon Risk Services and one of the driving forces behind the creation of Aon GRIP, has created a new set of insurance services around Insureon, which counts Edgar Bronfman as a major investor.

Insureon, an insurance delivery platform for small-business owners, earlier this year announced an agreement to acquire Insurance Noodle, an online wholesale insurance broker. Insurance Noodle was a subsidiary of Willis Group Holdings.

“The combination of Insureon’s top-tier online strategy with Noodle’s geographically diverse network of brokers and agents is a key component of our long-term strategy for growth,” said Devine.

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“We’re expanding our web presence via web pages, digital advertising, social media, blogs, eBooks and other digital attributes so that when small-business owners search for information about protecting their business, regardless of industry, they find it via an Insureon property,” said an Insureon spokesperson.

Broker-Carrier Relationships

When it comes to enhancing broker-carrier relations, ACE Risk Management has developed several technology-driven programs.

“Every piece of ACE Risk Management business that we can make electronic, we’re going to do that,” said Matt Merna, New York-based division president of ACE Risk Management.

Toward that end, the company has introduced ACE Worldview, an online tool that allows its brokers and clients to access their electronically held documents in one web-based portal.

“It makes it very easy for clients to access policies, endorsements, contracts, legal agreements and collateral — everything that can be stored and accessed electronically,” said Philadelphia-based Gary Kramer, senior vice president, ACE Global Services.

After consulting with its brokers and clients, the company also developed ACE Accelerator, which is for automotive selection forms. “As a client you have to choose your coverage selections and this previously was a very difficult practice in which a client would have to fill out 300 pages of forms,” Kramer said.

Now, instead of having each form signed and dated individually, ACE Risk Management asks overarching questions about the desired coverage. The responses are then mapped to the forms, and everything is electronically signed with one click of the button.

“So what used to take probably three business days now takes less than 20 minutes for the client,” Merna said.

Steve Yahn was a freelance writer based in New York. He had more than 40 years of financial reporting and editing experience. Comments can be directed to [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Manager Focus

Better Together

Risk managers reveal what they value in their brokers.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 11 min read

Michael K. Sheehan, (left) Managing Director, Marsh and Grant Barkey, Director of Risk Management, Motivate International Inc.

Ask a broker what they can do for you and they will tell you. But let’s ask the risk manager.

What do risk managers really need in a broker? And what do the best brokers do to help risk managers succeed in their jobs?

Chet Porembski, system vice president and deputy general counsel, OhioHealth Corp.

Risk managers say it’s a broker who helps them look knowledgeable and prepared to their bosses. It’s someone who sweeps in like a superhero with an ingenious solution to a difficult problem.

Risk managers want to see brokers bring forth better products year after year. They want a broker who shows up at renewal time with new ideas, not just a rubber stamp.

Great brokers embed with the risk management team and learn everything they can about the company and its leaders. They help risk managers prepare and keep tabs throughout the year on changes at the organization with an eye towards planning the future.

“There’s the broker that sees themselves as just a hired ‘vendor,’ or I should say, somebody that basically just does the job at hand,” said Chet Porembski, system vice president and deputy general counsel at OhioHealth Corp.

“And then there’s the broker that views themselves very much as a business partner.  They truly bring added value to the relationship.”

These brokers look at the tough issues the risk manager is facing and bring in the resources to try to help their client in ways even the client might not have thought about yet. They also do advanced planning that makes the risk manager’s job easier when a problem arises.

“That’s the kind of broker I want.” Porembski said.

And that’s the kind of broker many risk managers need more than ever.

“The only way that the relationship is going to be successful is if you build a tremendous amount of trust.” — Frances Clark, director of risk management and insurance, Sentara Healthcare

That’s because risk managers are under increasing pressure these days. They carry more weight as corporations shrink their departments to cut costs.

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Climate change, cyber threats and geopolitical shifts are turning what were once unthinkable losses into risks that are almost commonplace. And this is all happening in an under-insured risk environment, according a study by PwC entitled Broking 2020: Leading from the Front in a New Era of Risk.

Thankfully there are good brokers out there, risk managers say, who can bring more value to a client today than ever before and help ease that fear.

Brokers — the traditional intermediary in the risk transfer chain — do in fact have a tangible and growing role in developing viable and innovative solutions for the risk manager, according to PwC’s study.

They are the “global risk facilitation leaders.”

“[Whatever] organizations are doing in the short term — be this dealing with market instability or just going about day to-day business — they need to be looking at how to keep pace with the sweeping social, technological, economic, environmental and political (STEEP) developments that are transforming the world,” PwC said in the report.

Advisors That Are Getting It Done

Cyber risks are just one growing challenge that all organizations grapple with.

Frances Clark, director of risk management and insurance at Sentara Healthcare, remembers when her broker first suggested that she hold a leadership tabletop cyber drill.

Clark said her broker kept saying, “I know this is going to be a painful experience, but you are going to come out so much better in the long run.”

Frances Clark, director of risk management and insurance, Sentara Healthcare

Her broker was right, and went so far as to help arrange a system-wide drill that included representatives from the legal, finance, security, communications, marketing and medical teams.

They reviewed the many ways a cyber attack can happen and then practiced a response.

“We benefitted greatly from that exercise,” Clark said.

When Doctors on Demand developed a telemedicine app to offer mental health services through mobile devices, the company ran up against insurance limitations across state lines. All states require that the physician giving the advice be licensed in the same state where the patient is located.

The concern was for patient encounters where the patient actually crossed state boundaries during the encounter, due to the utilization of a mobile phone. The patient may have started with a properly licensed physician in the original state, but then crossed into a neighboring state where the physician was not licensed.

Larry Hansard, a regional managing director at Arthur J. Gallagher & Co., and a 2017 Power Broker®, worked to secure medical professional liability coverage without the traditional licensure exclusions placed on medical professionals by insurance carriers.

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The initiative he helped develop actually changes how health care can be delivered to patients. It allows the emerging telemedicine sector to now offer services around the world.

Two-thirds of the risk managers in the PwC Broker 2020 survey labeled their brokers as “trusted advisors.” But the same survey found that some participants see their broker as more of a straightforward service provider rather than as a source for solutions.

The survey results indicate there is plenty of room for brokers to bring more value to clients.

OhioHealth’s brokers meet each year with OhioHealth’s risk management team to review insurance coverages.  And when the health system holds quarterly risk management retreats, the brokers attend. They bring with them education and insights on a broad range of topics, from property insurance markets to cyber solutions.

Porembski’s brokers also collaborate with the risk managers when there’s an upcoming presentation on risk issues to senior management. Sometimes the brokers help prepare the presentation, he said.

“We end up looking exceptionally good to our senior leaders and our board,” he said.

Involving the broker in interactions with leaders outside the traditional risk management team has benefits beyond selling products, he said. It extends the relationship circle.

Clark tries not to think of her brokers as outside vendors just providing a service. She wants them to be as committed and knowledgeable about the organization as she is.

“The only way that the relationship is going to be successful is if you build a tremendous amount of trust,” Clark said.

“You have to be completely open and honest about everything, no matter how bad it is, or how bad it may look to the market or underwriters.”

“Once you establish that trusting relationship, I think everything else falls into place,” she adds.

Sentara underwent significant growth recently, acquiring five hospitals in about six years. The expansion required a vast amount of integration on insurance programs and a merger of risk management departments and claims.

Clark said her brokers rolled up their sleeves and expertly navigated her through the consolidation.

“I can’t reiterate enough how most risk managers don’t know how to deal with an M&A unless you’ve gone through it.”

She said she wouldn’t have been able to manage the risk of the mergers without her broker’s counsel.

Grading the Broker

Mike Lubben, director of global risk management at Henry Crown & Co. in Chicago, sets standard expectations of his insurance brokers: know the exposures, understand how a risk manager has to sell ideas internally and understand the urgency of requests.

He lets his brokers know his expectations with regular report cards, complete with letter grades. And he isn’t shy about giving out Fs.

  • How did the broker service the EPLI coverage?
  • Did the broker provide expertise and coverage analysis?
  • Was there anything creative?
  • Did the broker recommend new endorsements based on the previous exposure?
  • Did the broker recommend any risk mitigation programs?
  • How well did he communicate and help with presentations?

“A good broker will think this is fantastic,” Lubben said.

This method starts the conversation. It helps Lubben establish long relationships with some stellar brokers.  But if the broker misses the mark, Lubben can have a talk with them about ways to do better in the future. Some brokers he has sent away.

Recently a broker failed on what Lubben calls “blocking and tackling,” the basics like returning phone calls within one day and responding promptly to emails.

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Lubben gave him an “F” on those subjects and told him why. The broker still didn’t improve his game and was eventually replaced.

For many people, insurance can seem very routine from renewal to renewal. But a really good broker will break from routine and come back with some kind of enhancement or improvement.

If the renewal is flat with no change in premium, then Clark says she’ll ask, “What are you going to do for me this year?”

The best brokers are always striving for better, she said.

“Without the brokering community, you would be hard pressed to do your job. I really appreciate what the brokers do, they bring a level of expertise that we can’t possibly have on all lines of coverage.” — Mike Lubben, director of global risk management at Henry Crown & Co.

Motivate International Inc., which operates more than half of the bike share fleets in North America, went through a recent renewal.

Their broker, Marsh, explored more than 10 options with different strategies and programs. In the end, after all of that, they decided the expiring coverage was the best fit.

“Those exercises are very valuable for risk managers,” said Grant Barkey, Motivate’s director of risk management.

“As an innovative company committed to delivering best-in-class services, we believe thorough exploration leads to informed decision-making.”

A good broker understands that a company’s day-to-day operations and a highly effective risk management program have implications for what type of policy should be procured, he said.

Brokers need to partner with risk managers to figure out what those options are, and what the markets are saying and then succinctly relay the information to management.
They also need to have the tact and curiosity to inquire about future plans and figure out what resources might be needed to better serve their client.

When PwC surveyed risk managers, most put their insurance carriers and industry groups ahead of their brokers as the primary source of cyber and supply chain risk solutions; yet these areas are still cited as risk managers’ top concerns.

“Becoming the go-to partners for developing and coordinating innovative and effective solutions in these priority risk areas is at the heart of the commercial opportunity for brokers.” PwC said in its report.

“Yet, our survey suggests that these are important areas where brokers are falling short of the market’s demands and therefore need to adapt.

For example, less than a third of respondents are very satisfied with brokers’ analytical and modelling services across a range of areas.”

When participants were asked how their brokers could be more efficient, respondents put risk analysis at the top of PwC’s survey list. Significantly, more than a third also cited ‘big data’ analysis.

Finding the Right Fit

Paul Kim, Co-CBO of U.S. Retail at Aon Risk Solutions, helps match brokers to risk managers. He keeps in mind that insurance companies tend to sell product, while the clients are looking to manage risks. The right broker assists in mapping risks to existing products and also customizing broad solutions, he said.

“The risk manager’s job has become more complex in the current environment, but there are so many tools available for those individuals to make better informed decisions that truly help protect the overall risk profile of their companies,” Kim said.

Paul Kim, Co-CBO of U.S. Retail, Aon Risk Solutions

That’s why finding the right broker should be first and foremost, he said. Look for an individual with strong industry knowledge, product expertise and market relationships. A strong broker is able to effectively communicate what the risk manager’s goals are to the marketplace to be able to execute and achieve those goals.

“Not every broker can do that,” Kim said.

“Not every broker is the right broker.”

PwC said those brokers who quickly master the art and science of identifying ambiguous threats and then mobilize a broad private/public stakeholder pool to economically manage those risks over time will pull ahead of their competition.

“We’re really generalist,” Lubben said.

“Without the brokering community, you would be hard pressed to do your job. I really appreciate what the brokers do, they bring a level of expertise that we can’t possibly have on all lines of coverage.”

When selecting a broker, the risk manager should also take into account the entire organization behind the broker. Ask about the additional support systems that are available to the broker’s clients.

The company should have a deep bench so when the primary broker is out of the office there’s someone else to rely on who is almost as knowledgeable. The broker organization should also be able to assist you with your budgeting and forecasting from a financial risk perspective.

In PwC’s survey of risk managers, nearly three-quarters want analytics from their broker to help inform their decisionmaking, with concerns over new and emerging risks being a strong driver for this demand.

Clark also thinks it is vitally important for a broker to offer a claims advocate, somebody on the outside, when you are dealing with a carrier on a complicated claim.

“Otherwise you are vulnerable to what the carrier says,” Clark said.

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To lead in this new era of risk, it’s also important that brokers forge close relationships with a broader set of stakeholders that includes governments, academia, specialist risk consultancies and even their industry peers, PwC said in the report.

It’s also going to be important to develop shared databases and research capabilities.

In turn, brokers need to assure this diverse stakeholder group that they are the right party to lead.

Clark, at Sentara Healthcare, said she knows what her risk exposures are today, but she’d like her brokers to anticipate her needs before she does.

“It’s kind of crazy, but amazingly some of them do it,” Clark said.

The broker will also use past experience and industry knowledge to anticipate where policy terms and conditions can be tweaked and improved upon.

“They will, say, advise us that we need to change this policy language, and then a year later you have a claim on that and you thank your lucky stars that they changed it,” Clark said.

“It is amazing to me every time it happens.”  &

Juliann Walsh is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]