Risk Insider: Eric Copple

6 Ways to Fight Risk Management Muscle Atrophy

By: | September 14, 2018 • 2 min read
Eric B. Copple CIC, CRM is a risk management adviser for Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. Throughout his 20 years of brokerage experience, he has helped clients build effective risk management systems to stay on the road to success. He can be reached at [email protected]

Businesses often suffer from a condition I like to call “risk-management muscle atrophy.”

The ideas, processes, systems, and energy within these businesses were effective at one time, but the leadership stopped emphasizing and implementing them somewhere along the way. As a result, they became ineffective.

If your company is going through the business equivalent of a mid-life crisis, you might need to work toward recuperating long-unused muscle. How can you make that happen?

There are six key factors needed to re-strengthen atrophied business muscle:

1. Analysis

Begin with an analysis of where your business stands currently: how much muscle power has been lost? Using the appropriate weight-room equipment – Data Audits, Procedures Audits, Internal surveys – your business can begin to plot the path back to full strength.

2. Time

This return to good muscle health is going to take time. Determine just how important it is for you to get your program back in fighting form: how much time needs to be dedicated to this process?

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3. Consistency

Hire the equivalent of a personal trainer, someone who knows what methods work because they have personally witnessed their effects on other people. The right trainer can also help your business stay on track through behavioral consistency and regular exercises to help regrow those muscles.

4. Prioritization

To achieve your mission, it is vital that the people who are tasked with carrying it out on a daily basis believe in it. They must understand that in the current prioritization of tasks, the muscle health of the business is the number one focus.

5. Accountability

To ensure that the changes your business is making are long-lasting, you must sell the employees on the importance of this new workout initiative. Creating accountability among employees will be achievable if they love the idea of the desired outcome.

6. Motivation

Accountability will also increase company-wide motivation to succeed. This means making sure that you are hiring people who can align this idea with their personal goals or see this as a worthy use of their time.

When was the last time you reviewed your hiring process? How are you communicating your goals and vision? What questions are you asking the applicant to identify their personal goals? And as new hires settle in to the corporate structure, are you meeting with individual employees to ask questions that will discern whether or not they are thinking positively and are aligned with the change?

It’s time to get your risk-management muscle back. Let’s do the work to achieve good business health.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

In the Fast-Paced World of Retail, This Risk Manager Strives to Mitigate Risks Proactively and Keep Senior Leaders Informed

Janine Kral works to identify and mitigate risks, building strong partnerships with leaders and ensuring they see her as support rather than a blocker. 
By: | October 29, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My very first paid job was working on my uncle’s ranch in British Columbia in the summers. He had cattle, horses and grapes — an unusual combo. But my first real job out of college was as a multi-line claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Right out of college I applied for a job that turned out to be a claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual. I accepted because they were offering six weeks of training in Southern California, and at the time that sounded really fun. I spent about three years at Liberty Mutual and then I spent a short period of time at a smaller regional insurance company that hired me to start a workers’ compensation claims administration program.

I was hired at Nordstrom as the Washington Region Risk Manager, which was my first job in risk management. When I started at Nordstrom, the risk management department had about five people, and over the years it has grown to about 75. I’ve been vice president for 11 years.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I would say that technology has probably been the biggest change. When I started many years ago, it was all paper and no RMIS.

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R&I: What risks does the retail industry face that are unique?

We deal with a lot of people — employees and customers. With physical brick and mortar settings, there are the unique exposures with people moving in and out in a public environment. And of course, with ecommerce, we have a lot of customer and employee data, which creates cyber risk — which is not necessarily a unique risk in today’s environment.

R&I: Can you describe your approach to working with senior leaders and front-line staff alike to further risk management initiatives?

It starts with keeping the pulse of what’s happening with the business. Retail moves really fast. In order to identify and mitigate risks proactively, we identify top risk areas and topics, and then we ensure that we have strong partnerships with the leaders responsible for those areas. Trust is critical, ensuring that leaders see us as a support rather than a blocker.

R&I: What role does technology play in your company’s approach to risk management?

Janine Kral, claims adjuster, Nordstrom

We have an internal risk management information system that all of our locations report events into — every type of incident is reported, whether insured or uninsured. Most of these events are managed internally by risk management, and our guidelines require that prevention be analyzed on each one. Having all event data in one system allows us to use the data for trending and also helps us better predict what may happen in the future, and who we need to work with to mitigate risks.

R&I: What advice might you give to students or other aspiring risk managers?

My son is a sophomore in college, and I tell him and his friends all the time not to rule out insurance as a career opportunity. My advice is to cast a wide net and do your homework. Research all the different types of opportunities. Read a lot — articles, industry magazines, LinkedIn. Be proactive and reach out to people you find interesting and ask them about their careers. Don’t be shy and wait for people and opportunities to come to you. Ask questions. Build networks. Be curious and keep an open mind.

R&I: What are your goals for the next five to 10 years of your career?

I have always been passionate about continuous improvement. I want to continue to find ways to add value to my company and to this industry.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

My favorite book is Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. It’s a true story about a man who was in prison in Australia after being convicted of armed robbery, and he escaped to India. While in India, he passed himself off as a doctor in a slum. It’s a really interesting story, because this is a convicted criminal who ends up helping others. I am not always successful in getting others to read the book because it’s 1,000 pages and definitely a commitment.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Fiorella’s in Newton, Massachusetts. Great Italian food and a great overall experience.

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R&I: What is your favorite drink?

“Sister Carol.” I have no idea what is in it, and I can only get it at a local bar in Seattle. It’s green but it’s delicious.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Skydiving. Not tandem and without any sort of communication from the ground. Scary standing on a wing of a plane, but very peaceful once the chute opened, slowly floating down by myself.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

I can’t think of one individual person. For me, the real heroes are people who have a positive attitude in the face of adversity. People who are resilient no matter what life brings them.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

It’s rewarding to help solve problems and help people. I am proud of the support that my team provides others. &




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]