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A Streamlined Approach to Modern Construction Challenges

Against a backdrop of complex construction exposures, contractors are migrating to a new insurance approach that offers simplicity and enhanced protection.
By: | October 3, 2017 • 4 min read

Construction has never been an easy business. There are plans to draw up, approvals to win, materials and heavy equipment to maneuver, workers to manage, and financiers to appease — usually within tight time constraints. Expanded opportunities at brownfields, increased value engineering requirements, and skilled labor shortages all add to the sector’s challenges.

“The complexity of construction exposures continues to rapidly increase,” said Bill Sullivan, Senior Vice President, Head of Construction Casualty, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.

In this environment, contactors will want to reevaluate their insurance and risk management programs to ensure there are no coverage gaps, while at the same time addressing these emerging trends.

Current Trends Compound Complexity

Brownfield Sites

Bill Sullivan, Senior Vice President, Head of Construction Casualty

With the growth of urban centers in the U.S. and a scarcity of suitable building lots, contractors increasingly find opportunities in brownfield sites, which can be located in highly developed, densely populated areas. “At brownfield sites, contractors may have to deal with legacy pollution issues. They must be ready to respond to the possibility of such unknown site conditions. In addition, many brownfield redevelopments are high profile projects that local authorities have spent years nurturing,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan added, “Executing a project in a highly populated area means many potential impacted third parties. The contractor must negotiate and manage the impact work can have on the project’s neighbors. It’s a much different dynamic than working in a less populated setting.”

Value Engineering

The growing demand for value engineering means contractors are taking on the responsibility to review each building system and component for value, quality, lifecycle and maintainability. They also maximize value for their customer by providing direction concerning alternative materials and construction methods.

“If the contractor recommends an alternate material that has a shorter lifecycle, it may wind up costing the customer more in the long run to replace that material. Because the contractor is the one who suggested the use of a specific material, they need to be aware that they have taken on a professional liability exposure they may not have had absent value engineering,” Sullivan said.

Workforce

Shifting workforce demographics create another challenge for today’s contractors. On the one hand, contractors face a maturing workforce that is less experienced with new means and methods, while at the other end of the spectrum, contractors have new workers whose lack of experience can compromise project quality and exacerbate risks. Additionally, with respect to new workers, this inexperience can also create safety issues for both workers on-site and for the general public.

Meeting Today’s Challenges With An Integrated Solution

Against this backdrop of complex exposures, contractors are migrating to a new insurance approach that offers simplicity and enhanced protection. “In the past, contractors would typically secure separate coverages at the primary and excess levels from a portfolio of carriers. We’re now seeing customers and brokers looking at ways to achieve more seamless coverage from a single carrier. There is so much potential interplay between lines of coverage in construction that it’s important to have coordination between them,” Sullivan said.

One way to achieve integration is through the use of a single excess integrated follow form policy, which can schedule and follow multiple lines of underlying coverage, such as: general liability, environmental liability, employer’s liability, professional liability, and automobile liability (as opposed to having multiple separate insurance towers from numerous carriers). Aligning coverage through a single excess carrier may help to provide consistency in limits and tower attachment points and reduce coverage gaps. Perhaps most importantly, the integrated approach streamlines claims services through the single carrier, which avoids coverage disputes between multiple carriers providing different lines of coverage. Streamlined claims services also has the potential to reduce frictional claims expenses.

BHSI: Uniquely Positioned to Be Your Integrated Excess Insurer

BHSI has been at the forefront in providing integrated excess solutions for contractors. The company brings to market several major advantages:

  • With its financial strength, BHSI can offer the capacity needed for a first layer integrated excess program;
  • BHSI is committed to excellence in claims handling, with an emphasis on experience, transparency and accessibility;
  • BHSI focuses on collaboration among team members, keeping lines of communication open across different lines written; and
  • BHSI provides a wide range of insurance products, giving it the expertise needed to manage the diverse multi-lines of coverage provided by an integrated insurance program.

As Mr. Sullivan noted, “Our integrated excess solutions are not boilerplate programs. They are tailored to address unique challenges and meet the particular needs of each individual insured. We have the unique combination of experienced people, a strong balance sheet, a broad product and service portfolio, and a commitment to long-lasting customer relationships that is truly dynamic.”

To learn more, visit https://bhspecialty.com/.

The information contained herein is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any product or service. Any description set forth herein does not include all policy terms, conditions and exclusions. Please refer to the actual policy for complete details of coverage and exclusions.
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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance (www.bhspecialty.com) provides commercial property, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, surety, travel, programs, medical stop loss and homeowners insurance.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2018 Risk All Stars

Stop Mitigating Risk. Start Conquering It Like These 2018 Risk All Stars

The concept of risk mastery and ownership, as displayed by the 2018 Risk All Stars, includes not simply seeking to control outcomes but taking full responsibility for them.
By: | September 14, 2018 • 3 min read

People talk a lot about how risk managers can get a seat at the table. The discussion implies that the risk manager is an outsider, striving to get the ear or the attention of an insider, the CEO or CFO.

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But there are risk managers who go about things in a different way. And the 2018 Risk All Stars are prime examples of that.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Goodyear’s Craig Melnick had only been with the global tire maker a few months when Hurricane Harvey dumped a record amount of rainfall on Houston.

Brilliant communication between Melnick and his new teammates gave him timely and valuable updates on the condition of manufacturing locations. Melnick remained in Akron, mastering the situation by moving inventory out of the storm’s path and making sure remediation crews were lined up ahead of time to give Goodyear its best leg up once the storm passed and the flood waters receded.

Goodyear’s resiliency in the face of the storm gave it credibility when it went to the insurance markets later that year for renewals. And here is where we hear a key phrase, produced by Kevin Garvey, one of Goodyear’s brokers at Aon.

“The markets always appreciate a risk manager who demonstrates ownership,” Garvey said, in what may be something of an understatement.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Dianne Howard, a 2018 Risk All Star and the director of benefits and risk management for the Palm Beach County School District, achieved ownership of $50 million in property storm exposures for the district.

With FEMA saying it wouldn’t pay again for district storm losses it had already paid for, Howard went to the London markets and was successful in getting coverage. She also hammered out a deal in London that would partially reimburse the district if it suffered a mass shooting and needed to demolish a building, like what happened at Sandy Hook in Connecticut.

2018 Risk All Star Jim Cunningham was well-versed enough to know what traditional risk management theories would say when hospitality workers were suffering too many kitchen cuts. “Put a cut-prevention plan in place,” is the traditional wisdom.

But Cunningham, the vice president of risk management for the gaming company Pinnacle Entertainment, wasn’t satisfied with what looked to him like a Band-Aid approach.

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Instead, he used predictive analytics, depending on his own team to assemble company-specific data, to determine which safety measures should be used company wide. The result? Claims frequency at the company dropped 60 percent in the first year of his program.

Alumine Bellone, a 2018 Risk All Star and the vice president of risk management for Ardent Health Services, faced an overwhelming task: Create a uniform risk management program when her hospital group grew from 14 hospitals in three states to 31 hospitals in seven.

Bellone owned the situation by visiting each facility right before the acquisition and again right after, to make sure each caregiving population was ready to integrate into a standardized risk management system.

After consolidating insurance policies, Bellone achieved $893,000 in synergies.

In each of these cases, and in more on the following pages, we see examples of risk managers who weren’t just knocking on the door; they were owning the room. &

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Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, clarity of vision and passion.

See the complete list of 2018 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]