Cyber Risk

High Net Worth’s Unique Cyber Challenges

Emerging cyber risk is a challenge for everyone these days, but for high net worth individuals and families, the challenges can be even greater.
By: | September 12, 2017 • 6 min read

High net worth individuals have a bigger attack surface,” said Martin Hartley, executive vice president and chief operating officer of PURE Group of Insurance Companies. “They have more devices, they travel more, they may have domestic staff. There is just a greater attack surface for someone targeting them to get through.”

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Wealth attracts theft, but the lifestyles of the better off make them targets as well. They tend to embrace technology, from computer-enhanced toys to a vast array of smart home devices, most of which are Wi-Fi enabled, presenting opportunities for would-be cyber thieves.

“With all of the smart home technology, [criminals can] hack into your thermostat, which now gives them access to the rest of your network and … the phones, iPads, and computers that family members do their banking on,” said Lisa Lindsay, executive director at the Private Risk Management Association. The latest gadgets or apps may still have unknown bugs or weaknesses, as well.

Domestic staff and frequent entertaining can both lead to sharing passwords, which makes networks less secure.

“Children of the high net worth will have phones earlier,” said Kim Lucarelli, senior vice president and director of personal client management at Oswald Companies. “They may have them at 10, 11 years old.” Children that age are less likely to understand the importance of good cyber hygiene, and more likely to develop bad habits that will be difficult to unlearn when they get older.

The wealthy tend to travel more. Using unknown networks to control remote devices or conduct financial transactions, especially abroad, puts home networks, sensitive financial information, or even accounts themselves at risk.

Lisa Lindsay, executive director, the Private Risk Management Association

“People think all the time, ‘Everything I do at home I can do remotely,’ and that is true,” said Heather Posner, director of high net worth at Burns & Wilcox. “But … how do you make sure you’re secure? Whether you’re paying bills, filing your taxes, changing your thermostat, setting your alarm, what kind of exposure are you opening yourself up to if you’re not doing that in a secure manner?”

Lindsay agrees. “People have to know public Wi-Fi common sense,” she said. “They’re sitting in a hotel lobby in Rome transacting financial matters. It’s crazy. You shouldn’t even do that [in the U.S].”

Other risks arise from technological advances of another sort. Cyber criminals drive through neighborhoods to access vulnerable home networks, and experts are increasingly concerned about the use of drones, which would allow criminals to detect and hack into networks remotely from a mile or two away, including networks not accessible from the street.

The ultimate goal of those hackers is, of course, simple. “Without a doubt, it is theft of funds from their bank account, through a variety of different means,” said Hartley. “ … That is the highest risk facing high net worth individuals.”

“High net worth individuals have a bigger attack surface. They have more devices, they travel more, they may have domestic staff … more transactions are occurring.” —Martin Hartley, executive vice president and chief operating officer, PURE Group of Insurance Companies

Identity theft or the use of stolen login info to access accounts can be devastating and disruptive, but in those cases the financial institution may accept liability. However, criminals can also use information gleaned from social media accounts, with or without stolen personal information, to craft sophisticated social engineering scams.

Social media posts made while traveling often provide details that make fraudulent correspondence so convincing, and the distance between family members can make fake pleas for money more believable and urgent.

Hartley routinely sees cases where thieves have used information stolen or gleaned from social media to create utterly convincing correspondences instructing personal assistants to transfer often vast sums of money.

“The bank is not liable,” said Hartley. “They say, ‘We followed our protocols. It was your personal assistant, who is an authorized bank user, who wired the money out of the account.’ That money is gone.”

“This is the nature of an evolving risk,” he said. “Today we have $10,000 worth of coverage for this kind of loss,” although PURE will soon roll out new coverage with much higher limits.

Defamation Claims

The fastest growing liability claim, according to a claim supervisor at Chubb, is online defamation, said Oswald’s Lucarelli.

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These claims often have to do with negative reviews on Yelp or other online platforms.

While such a claim may be picked up by a traditional liability policy, Lucarelli sees the potential for coverage gaps.

“If it’s deemed an intentional act there may not be coverage,” she said, adding, “The coverage really is more around bodily injury … Mental anguish isn’t a loss that’s likely covered.”

And coverage under a traditional liability policy maybe not be a sure thing. “AIG calls their coverage ‘silent,’” she said. Meaning maybe they’ll cover it, maybe they won’t.

Ambiguous language typically leans in the client’s favor, but Lucarelli hopes the industry will trend toward more explicit coverage.

Some high net worth carriers have bolstered their cyber offering. Lucarelli said it’s a good start, citing a new coverage from AIG called Family Cyber Edge, which includes coverage for data restoration, cyber extortion and ransomware, crisis management for reputational harm, as well as cyber bullying expenses. “They’ve done a good job rolling a lot of these coverages into one endorsement.”

Still, Lucarelli sees unmet demand for more specific cyber bullying liability coverage. “We interviewed 300 people and most said, ‘If you offer coverage that defines this and you even put a cap a limit on it of, say, $250,000, I’ll buy it.’ ”

Kim Lucarelli, senior vice president and director, personal client management, Oswald Companies

The new, higher-limit coverage PURE will be rolling out in coming months — which will include high-limit coverage for social engineering and cyber fraud losses — utilizes a new approach to cyber security. PURE is partnering with the cyber security firm Rubica for active cyber monitoring.

Coverage will be contingent on having an app installed on each of the insured’s devices. All data will be sent via VPN to Rubica’s cloud, which will use pattern recognition, a constantly updated list of known trouble spots, and AI to flag problems.

“They’re actively monitoring where data packages are being sent and identifying if they go off somewhere they shouldn’t. Then they can shut them off,” said Hartley.

Rubica’s model could be game changing. By monitoring the data itself, Rubica can detect problems regardless of how they are introduced, and avert them before they are executed.

PURE has such confidence in its efficacy that it will be offering coverage limits that would previously been considered prohibitive.

Ultimately, however, the most important aspect of cyber coverage for the high net worth lies in assessing and minimizing cyber risk. “So many people are looking for that,” said Lucarelli. “‘Just give me 10 great tips to make myself more secure.’”

“People want to know how to best prevent this sort of thing, not deal with it after it’s occurred,” agreed Hartley. “The gap between smart risk behavior and not smart risk behavior is one of just simply not knowing.” &

Jon McGoran is a novelist and magazine editor based outside of Philadelphia. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

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Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

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John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]