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2018 Power Broker

Education

No Problem Too Big

Charmaine Davis, CIC, CRM
Senior Vice President
Marsh, Washington, D.C.

Earthquakes on campus? No problem. Remote flights? No problem. High premiums? No problem. With Charmaine Davis, clients know the words “no problem” aren’t lip service.

Davis’ “no problem” solutions are the result of hard work, industry knowledge and connections; understanding client needs; and leveraging the marketplace to her clients’ advantage.

“When I was new to my job, Charmaine carried me — she educated me and helped me understand this field,” said one higher education client.

“More recently, when an earthquake damaged buildings on campus, caused a gas leak and left one building shuttered, Charmaine and her Marsh team walked us through this large, complex claim. She spent many, many extra hours on this, and there were never any fees or charges — just total support.”

“Her advice is perfect,” said another client. “I would recommend Charmaine to anyone.”

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The client added that Davis was able to renegotiate their high-premium workers’ comp coverage into a unique risk solution — a program that provided them with chargeback money, ultimately saving them around $200,000. “That savings is because of Charmaine,” he added. “She used her ingenuity to make that happen.”

“Nothing fazes Charmaine,” said another client whose wildlife conservation program requires charter flights to remote locations. She said Davis introduced them to a risk management program that helps enterprise-wide, allowing them to focus on their mission.

He Can Teach You a Thing or Two

Tyler LaMantia, CLCS
Area Executive Vice President
Gallagher, Rolling Meadows, Ill.

Every school district wants to allocate funds to its core purpose: educating students. Tyler LaMantia helped school district members of the Prairie State Insurance Cooperative (PSIC) in Illinois do just that — and more. Working closely with PSIC and its executive board, LaMantia developed a multi-year plan to protect the pool’s finances by mitigating risk with proactive claim management and loss control, while keeping member deductibles low and retentions stable.

PSIC members also improved risk management using a three-pronged loss control program LaMantia helped implement, resulting in fewer claims. Members received on-site loss control strategies targeted specifically at their risk needs and online loss-control training for all school district employees. Additionally, he educated them about cyber risks, leading to the decision to make cyber-threat coverage part of their package rather than an add-on.

“Tyler and the team literally built a better mouse trap,” said Dave Cratty, finance manager, Special Education Association of Peoria County. “Tyler’s dedication to and knowledge of the education sector, particularly in K to 12, is so strong. There might be someone out there who knows as much as him, but it’s hard to imagine anyone who knows more.”

In 2017, PSIC declared an equity return of more than $700,000 to its member school districts while maintaining a low-deductible structure — with no increases to property, auto or general liability deductibles. They also closed out 2009/2010 and 2010/2011 policy year claims, which typically were taking 10 or more years to settle.

Changing the Conversation

Shelley Levine, CIC, CRM, CSRM
Area Executive Vice President
Gallagher, New York

One of Shelley Levine’s education clients had an important but unplanned call in just a few hours. So he emailed her for some advice. Could she spend some time going over their policy to prep him? Of course, she said. But she did one better. Within the hour Levine was on campus and ready to take the call with her client.

“That’s the kind of customer service we get from Shelley. She’s super-responsive in addition to being knowledgeable, analytical and a strong negotiator.”

One client said Levine’s knowledge and negotiating skill enhanced their coverage while decreasing their costs.

“Shelley conducted an analysis of our coverage, which resulted in us gaining millions of dollars in additional coverage, two or three new lines of coverage and a couple of enhancements — all for the same or less premium cost than we had been paying,” said the client.

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When an education client challenged Levine to help them enhance their enterprise risk management (ERM) she took the time to get to know the school’s culture with an eye on every operational detail.

The school wanted faculty, staff and students to play a role in ERM but was struggling with how to include students who already had packed schedules.

“Shelley changed the conversation. Instead of a club or another meeting for the kids around ERM, she laid out a process that students use to make decisions. The new process integrated ERM into what they were already doing. Students make policy around real problems we face.”

Protecting the Study Abroad Experience

Chris Lueders, ARM
Area Senior Vice President
Gallagher, Rolling Meadows, Ill.

What’s that line about “the best laid plans?” Many of us have had something important — and costly — go wrong. For students studying abroad, such a disruption can affect academic progress and derail chances for a meaningful learning experience.

Chris Lueders of Gallagher came up with a risk solution for this problem at a major university. Their director of risk management explained: “We had no mechanism in place to provide student refunds if study abroad trips needed to be cancelled. There are sometimes concerns around international travel or specific travel advisories or bans that we follow for student safety.

“Chris worked very hard and was instrumental in putting together a trip cancellation policy and insurance product — the first one we had and the first one I am aware of in the market. Now this product is mandatory for our students embarking on study abroad trips.”

The director of compliance and risk management at another of Lueder’s higher education clients lauded her for great customer service — turnaround within two          hours — and for being a creative thinker who devises creative solutions.

This client had a complicated placement with moving and storing library books. The property carrier wasn’t competitive, so Lueder explored options and got coverage for the books under a cargo policy for a great price. The client added, “We’ve had some other sticky or 11th hour placements, but I’ve never felt placed on the back burner by Chris — she always makes us feel like we’re her most important client.”

Securing Hard-to-Get Coverage

Roberto Santiago
Vice President
Marsh, New York

Football and its relationship with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have been in the news of late, but the reality is that this risk exists in other areas, too. Sports such as ice hockey, rugby, soccer and even cheerleading carry TBI risks, explained Evelyn Wilson, director of purchasing and vendor relations, Salem State University.

The number of carriers willing to write coverage is limited.  Salem State University and fellow members of a Massachusetts-based college consortium bought coverage together — until their carrier drastically altered coverage by attaching a participant injury waiver and a neurodegenerative injury exclusion to all their accounts.

They faced an uphill battle; but they didn’t face it alone. They turned to Roberto Santiago of Marsh to give them the home-team advantage.

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Santiago faced a triple challenge: Find a replacement insurer, find it in a limited marketplace and convince the insurer to write the unique program structure the consortium members needed to operate athletics programs and protect students. Santiago conducted an extensive search without breaking a sweat. The result was a program that covered TBI at a very competitive price.

“Roberto has a very deep knowledge about higher education,” said Wilson. “His analysis is always in-depth, and he works very closely with us and other members of the consortium. He’s responsive, his customer service is excellent and we could not be happier with him.”

One Size Does Not Fit All

James Shewey
Client and Sales Executive
RCM&D, Glen Allen, Va.

Life on a college campus is rarely dull. Consequently, neither is life as a campus risk manager. But RCM&D’s James Shewey is helping to create risk solutions that leave everyone involved breathing a little easier.

Steve McAllister, vice president for finance and administration, Washington and Lee University, had handled a lot in his tenure.

Then the dance program told him that they wanted to do a spring semester performance off the side of a campus building. Not to worry. Just call James.

“We called James, and he worked closely with the carrier, the dance program, the rig company and everyone else to coordinate all the needs and make sure we were covered. James knows that insurance is not a one-size-fits-all box for us, and he is flexible in his approach and in managing both liability and perception of liability,” said McAllister.

Shewey also helped the Washington and Lee team with emergency management planning and drills. “James helped our internal team plan and hold these emergency drills in real time. Afterward he evaluated the drills and made recommendations to us,” said McAllister.

Pat McCann, CFO, the University of Virginia Foundation, said James is a 10 out of 10 in customer service, industry knowledge and risk solutions.

“We have a lot of real estate,” McCann noted. “And James has been very strategic in how he structures that coverage, so we get the right coverage at a fair price. He’s also brought in experts at no cost to us to advise us on risk management issues. He is exceptional.”

The complete list of 2018 Power Broker® winners can be found here.

Finalists:

Nick Baumgartner
Account Executive
Aon, Chicago

Alex Burton
Area President
Gallagher, Birmingham, Al.

James Gershon
Executive Vice President
Bolton & Company, Santa Clara, Calif.

Greg Hunter
Area Managing Director
Gallagher, Boston

Wendy Rosler
Senior Vice President
Marsh, New York

 

 

 

 

 

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

The Profession

Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]