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Brokers

Decades Spent Serving Clients

With a lifetime of accomplishments under his belt, Woodrow Cross wants to keep going.
By: | January 17, 2017 • 4 min read
Topics: Brokerage

At the age of 100, Woodrow Cross has no plans to retire.

The founder and chairman an of Cross Insurance – the Bangor, Maine-based independent insurance provider that employs 800 people at 40 locations in five states – still goes to work a few days per week to schmooze with his staff, service his insurance clients and grow the business.

He won’t retire, Cross said, because running his insurance dynasty is more fun than anything else.

“I like the challenge,” he said. “I like growing the business. I like the people.”

A Sociable Man

Cross has made a few concessions to age, such as moving to an assisted living facility, employing a driver and using a wheelchair. His hearing isn’t what it used to be. When he walks, or rolls, into his office, he makes the rounds of hellos and well wishes from the staff, which include his son Royce, president and CEO; grandson Jonathan, executive vice president; and grandson Woodrow, commercial lines account executive. His late son Brent served as executive vice president.

The Cross family, from left, Jonathan Cross (grandson); Royce Cross (son); the late Brent Cross (son); Woodrow Cross; and grandson Woodrow Cross. Photo taken in 2014.

“It’s exhilarating,” he said to see his family thriving and contributing. It makes his heart swell with pride and joy.

He is a sociable man. When Cross was proprietor of a country store in the tiny hamlet of Bradford, Maine, during the Depression, the store’s wood stove served as the town’s meeting spot.

There was no television and few radios, said his son Royce. No alcohol because of Prohibition, although a few men occasionally bought large quantities of vanilla extract, putatively to bake a cake.

“The entertainment was visiting with each other in the store,” Royce Cross said, “and Woodrow was at the center.”

His personality continues to bring in business. At a recent event recognizing his business and civic accomplishments, Woodrow Cross and another honoree made their acquaintance – in whispers – at the rear of the stage as a speaker delivered his speech at the podium.

“They really hit it off,” Royce Cross said.

The new acquaintance, it turned out, was part of a large national organization, and he was so impressed that he moved the company’s sizable insurance accounts to Cross Insurance.

“Sales is what I love,” Woodrow Cross said. “I haven’t lost the excitement. I hope I’m improving.”

Servicing Clients

Cross also takes pleasure in doing right by his clients, Royce said. For example, when a client’s property burned one Christmas Eve after the office had closed early for the holiday, Cross took Royce to the property to work on the claim, delaying their own festivities.

“That was a good Christmas. When you help someone, that’s rewarding,” Royce said.

“We were brought up to help,” he said.

Without resorting to intimidation, despotism or tyranny, Cross is a perfectionist when it comes to service, Royce said. “He taught us, ‘There’s a limited amount you can do for your clients on pricing, so come back on service.’ ”

Woodrow Cross in a University of Maine Hockey jersey.

When banks and real estate agencies need binders for closing, Cross taught his sons to “move quickly. Close the deal before they can go to the competition,” Royce said.

Woodrow Cross built the largest independent insurance provider in the Northeast, acquired more than 100 agencies, has buildings in Bangor and Portland bearing his name, was awarded an honorary doctorate and is generally considered a bastion of Bangor’s economy.

But it’s also important to him that he remembers his first business of selling seed door to door at age 6, and his teenage entrepreneurial venture of raising baby chickens and selling them at a profit.

“He doesn’t see himself as a big important guy, and he doesn’t permit grandiosity in his children,” Royce said. “I speak to him every day of my life, and I can’t recall a conversation when we talked about ourselves as pretty special. He wouldn’t like it.”

The combination of ambition for future accomplishments and modesty about past ones is the mainspring behind the company’s growth.

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The company that Cross started in 1954 at his kitchen table now sells and services personal and commercial insurance lines, employee benefits, surety bonds, comprehensive risk management advice and counsel, and specialized products focused on higher education and high net worth needs.

Cross’ extroversion, ambition, love of family and community, resourcefulness and honesty is a perfect fit for his profession, said Royce, who joined the company in the 1970s.

Indeed, Woodrow Cross said, no pleasure associated with retirement would deliver the shot of joy, pride and adrenaline that he gets from his work.

Does he have any regrets for trips not taken or golf not played?

“No regrets,” Cross said. “No bucket list.” &

Susannah Levine writes about health care, education and technology. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2018 Risk All Stars

Stop Mitigating Risk. Start Conquering It Like These 2018 Risk All Stars

The concept of risk mastery and ownership, as displayed by the 2018 Risk All Stars, includes not simply seeking to control outcomes but taking full responsibility for them.
By: | September 14, 2018 • 3 min read

People talk a lot about how risk managers can get a seat at the table. The discussion implies that the risk manager is an outsider, striving to get the ear or the attention of an insider, the CEO or CFO.

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But there are risk managers who go about things in a different way. And the 2018 Risk All Stars are prime examples of that.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Goodyear’s Craig Melnick had only been with the global tire maker a few months when Hurricane Harvey dumped a record amount of rainfall on Houston.

Brilliant communication between Melnick and his new teammates gave him timely and valuable updates on the condition of manufacturing locations. Melnick remained in Akron, mastering the situation by moving inventory out of the storm’s path and making sure remediation crews were lined up ahead of time to give Goodyear its best leg up once the storm passed and the flood waters receded.

Goodyear’s resiliency in the face of the storm gave it credibility when it went to the insurance markets later that year for renewals. And here is where we hear a key phrase, produced by Kevin Garvey, one of Goodyear’s brokers at Aon.

“The markets always appreciate a risk manager who demonstrates ownership,” Garvey said, in what may be something of an understatement.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Dianne Howard, a 2018 Risk All Star and the director of benefits and risk management for the Palm Beach County School District, achieved ownership of $50 million in property storm exposures for the district.

With FEMA saying it wouldn’t pay again for district storm losses it had already paid for, Howard went to the London markets and was successful in getting coverage. She also hammered out a deal in London that would partially reimburse the district if it suffered a mass shooting and needed to demolish a building, like what happened at Sandy Hook in Connecticut.

2018 Risk All Star Jim Cunningham was well-versed enough to know what traditional risk management theories would say when hospitality workers were suffering too many kitchen cuts. “Put a cut-prevention plan in place,” is the traditional wisdom.

But Cunningham, the vice president of risk management for the gaming company Pinnacle Entertainment, wasn’t satisfied with what looked to him like a Band-Aid approach.

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Instead, he used predictive analytics, depending on his own team to assemble company-specific data, to determine which safety measures should be used company wide. The result? Claims frequency at the company dropped 60 percent in the first year of his program.

Alumine Bellone, a 2018 Risk All Star and the vice president of risk management for Ardent Health Services, faced an overwhelming task: Create a uniform risk management program when her hospital group grew from 14 hospitals in three states to 31 hospitals in seven.

Bellone owned the situation by visiting each facility right before the acquisition and again right after, to make sure each caregiving population was ready to integrate into a standardized risk management system.

After consolidating insurance policies, Bellone achieved $893,000 in synergies.

In each of these cases, and in more on the following pages, we see examples of risk managers who weren’t just knocking on the door; they were owning the room. &

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Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, clarity of vision and passion.

See the complete list of 2018 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]