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A Streamlined Approach to Modern Construction Challenges

Against a backdrop of complex construction exposures, contractors are migrating to a new insurance approach that offers simplicity and enhanced protection.
By: | October 3, 2017 • 4 min read

Construction has never been an easy business. There are plans to draw up, approvals to win, materials and heavy equipment to maneuver, workers to manage, and financiers to appease — usually within tight time constraints. Expanded opportunities at brownfields, increased value engineering requirements, and skilled labor shortages all add to the sector’s challenges.

“The complexity of construction exposures continues to rapidly increase,” said Bill Sullivan, Senior Vice President, Head of Construction Casualty, Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance.

In this environment, contactors will want to reevaluate their insurance and risk management programs to ensure there are no coverage gaps, while at the same time addressing these emerging trends.

Current Trends Compound Complexity

Brownfield Sites

Bill Sullivan, Senior Vice President, Head of Construction Casualty

With the growth of urban centers in the U.S. and a scarcity of suitable building lots, contractors increasingly find opportunities in brownfield sites, which can be located in highly developed, densely populated areas. “At brownfield sites, contractors may have to deal with legacy pollution issues. They must be ready to respond to the possibility of such unknown site conditions. In addition, many brownfield redevelopments are high profile projects that local authorities have spent years nurturing,” Sullivan said.

Sullivan added, “Executing a project in a highly populated area means many potential impacted third parties. The contractor must negotiate and manage the impact work can have on the project’s neighbors. It’s a much different dynamic than working in a less populated setting.”

Value Engineering

The growing demand for value engineering means contractors are taking on the responsibility to review each building system and component for value, quality, lifecycle and maintainability. They also maximize value for their customer by providing direction concerning alternative materials and construction methods.

“If the contractor recommends an alternate material that has a shorter lifecycle, it may wind up costing the customer more in the long run to replace that material. Because the contractor is the one who suggested the use of a specific material, they need to be aware that they have taken on a professional liability exposure they may not have had absent value engineering,” Sullivan said.

Workforce

Shifting workforce demographics create another challenge for today’s contractors. On the one hand, contractors face a maturing workforce that is less experienced with new means and methods, while at the other end of the spectrum, contractors have new workers whose lack of experience can compromise project quality and exacerbate risks. Additionally, with respect to new workers, this inexperience can also create safety issues for both workers on-site and for the general public.

Meeting Today’s Challenges With An Integrated Solution

Against this backdrop of complex exposures, contractors are migrating to a new insurance approach that offers simplicity and enhanced protection. “In the past, contractors would typically secure separate coverages at the primary and excess levels from a portfolio of carriers. We’re now seeing customers and brokers looking at ways to achieve more seamless coverage from a single carrier. There is so much potential interplay between lines of coverage in construction that it’s important to have coordination between them,” Sullivan said.

One way to achieve integration is through the use of a single excess integrated follow form policy, which can schedule and follow multiple lines of underlying coverage, such as: general liability, environmental liability, employer’s liability, professional liability, and automobile liability (as opposed to having multiple separate insurance towers from numerous carriers). Aligning coverage through a single excess carrier may help to provide consistency in limits and tower attachment points and reduce coverage gaps. Perhaps most importantly, the integrated approach streamlines claims services through the single carrier, which avoids coverage disputes between multiple carriers providing different lines of coverage. Streamlined claims services also has the potential to reduce frictional claims expenses.

BHSI: Uniquely Positioned to Be Your Integrated Excess Insurer

BHSI has been at the forefront in providing integrated excess solutions for contractors. The company brings to market several major advantages:

  • With its financial strength, BHSI can offer the capacity needed for a first layer integrated excess program;
  • BHSI is committed to excellence in claims handling, with an emphasis on experience, transparency and accessibility;
  • BHSI focuses on collaboration among team members, keeping lines of communication open across different lines written; and
  • BHSI provides a wide range of insurance products, giving it the expertise needed to manage the diverse multi-lines of coverage provided by an integrated insurance program.

As Mr. Sullivan noted, “Our integrated excess solutions are not boilerplate programs. They are tailored to address unique challenges and meet the particular needs of each individual insured. We have the unique combination of experienced people, a strong balance sheet, a broad product and service portfolio, and a commitment to long-lasting customer relationships that is truly dynamic.”

To learn more, visit https://bhspecialty.com/.

The information contained herein is for general informational purposes only and does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any product or service. Any description set forth herein does not include all policy terms, conditions and exclusions. Please refer to the actual policy for complete details of coverage and exclusions.
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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Berkshire Hathaway Specialty Insurance (www.bhspecialty.com) provides commercial property, casualty, healthcare professional liability, executive and professional lines, surety, travel, programs, accident and health, medical stop loss, and homeowners insurance. The actual and final terms of coverage for all product lines may vary. It underwrites on the paper of Berkshire Hathaway's National Indemnity group of insurance companies, which hold financial strength ratings of A++ from AM Best and AA+ from Standard & Poor's.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

4 Companies That Rocked It by Treating Injured Workers as Equals; Not Adversaries

The 2018 Teddy Award winners built their programs around people, not claims, and offer proof that a worker-centric approach is a smarter way to operate.
By: | October 30, 2018 • 3 min read

Across the workers’ compensation industry, the concept of a worker advocacy model has been around for a while, but has only seen notable adoption in recent years.

Even among those not adopting a formal advocacy approach, mindsets are shifting. Formerly claims-centric programs are becoming worker-centric and it’s a win all around: better outcomes; greater productivity; safer, healthier employees and a stronger bottom line.

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That’s what you’ll see in this month’s issue of Risk & Insurance® when you read the profiles of the four recipients of the 2018 Theodore Roosevelt Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Award, sponsored by PMA Companies. These four programs put workers front and center in everything they do.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top,” said Steve Legg, director of risk management for Starbucks.

Starbucks put claims reporting in the hands of its partners, an exemplary act of trust. The coffee company also put itself in workers’ shoes to identify and remove points of friction.

That led to a call center run by Starbucks’ TPA and a dedicated telephonic case management team so that partners can speak to a live person without the frustration of ‘phone tag’ and unanswered questions.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top.” — Steve Legg, director of risk management, Starbucks

Starbucks also implemented direct deposit for lost-time pay, eliminating stressful wait times for injured partners, and allowing them to focus on healing.

For Starbucks, as for all of the 2018 Teddy Award winners, the approach is netting measurable results. With higher partner satisfaction, it has seen a 50 percent decrease in litigation.

Teddy winner Main Line Health (MLH) adopted worker advocacy in a way that goes far beyond claims.

Employees who identify and report safety hazards can take credit for their actions by sending out a formal “Employee Safety Message” to nearly 11,000 mailboxes across the organization.

“The recognition is pretty cool,” said Steve Besack, system director, claims management and workers’ compensation for the health system.

MLH also takes a non-adversarial approach to workers with repeat injuries, seeing them as a resource for identifying areas of improvement.

“When you look at ‘repeat offenders’ in an unconventional way, they’re a great asset to the program, not a liability,” said Mike Miller, manager, workers’ compensation and employee safety for MLH.

Teddy winner Monmouth County, N.J. utilizes high-tech motion capture technology to reduce the chance of placing new hires in jobs that are likely to hurt them.

Monmouth County also adopted numerous wellness initiatives that help workers manage their weight and improve their wellbeing overall.

“You should see the looks on their faces when their cholesterol is down, they’ve lost weight and their blood sugar is better. We’ve had people lose 30 and 40 pounds,” said William McGuane, the county’s manager of benefits and workers’ compensation.

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Do these sound like minor program elements? The math says otherwise: Claims severity has plunged from $5.5 million in 2009 to $1.3 million in 2017.

At the University of Pennsylvania, putting workers first means getting out from behind the desk and finding out what each one of them is tasked with, day in, day out — and looking for ways to make each of those tasks safer.

Regular observations across the sprawling campus have resulted in a phenomenal number of process and equipment changes that seem simple on their own, but in combination have created a substantially safer, healthier campus and improved employee morale.

UPenn’s workers’ comp costs, in the seven-digit figures in 2009, have been virtually cut in half.

Risk & Insurance® is proud to honor the work of these four organizations. We hope their stories inspire other organizations to be true partners with the employees they depend on. &

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]