Sponsored: Liberty Mutual Insurance

Planning a Warehouse in the City? Here are 5 Ways Your Risks Will Change.

The demand for fast delivery is driving the growth of city warehouses, but these urban facilities present unique property and safety challenges for wholesale distributors.
By: | July 30, 2018 • 6 min read

How quickly do you want that package you ordered today? Would you rather have it tomorrow, or a week from now?

According to the National Retail Federation, nearly 40 percent of online shoppers expect free two-day delivery, which is no surprise considering the appeal of online shopping lies in its convenience and speed.

But these expectations increase the pressure on wholesale distributors to shorten last-mile delivery timelines. Where warehousing was once a mechanism to store inventory at low cost, it’s now becoming a way to keep products closer to consumers to cut down on delivery lead times and costs.

“This is where urban warehouses come into play,” said Mark Morneau, Senior Vice President and General Manager, National Insurance, East Division, Liberty Mutual Insurance. “By moving into cities and getting products closer to where consumers live, they eliminate some delivery lead time and expense.”

Warehouses in densely-populated areas, however, come with unique risks that suburban or rural warehouses don’t typically need to manage. As wholesale distributors increasingly turn to urban warehousing to meet the demands of e-commerce, risk managers should be aware of these key risks and challenges:

1. Older Properties in Densely-Packed Neighborhoods

Warehousing in an urban setting typically means moving into an older and smaller building than what would be available further outside city limits, which presents many challenges.

“Oftentimes the buildings used are old manufacturing facilities that aren’t designed for extensive storage. So, they need to be brought up to standards suitable for housing products for wholesale distribution,” Morneau said.

That means retrofitting them with standard and code-compliant sprinkler, ventilation, electrical, and alarm systems and reconfiguring the space to properly store and move inventory, which could include raising ceilings, adding racks, and widening loading docks.

“Being much closer to your neighbors also presents risks,” Morneau said. “In densely populated areas, a fire that starts three buildings down can still take out your facility. Older water systems may not supply sufficient water pressure for fire sprinkler systems, so fire pumps may also need to be installed.”

While infrequent, fires can result in total loss without the proper safeguards. Clear emergency response and recovery plans can help mitigate the damage.

2. Premises Security

Fully-stocked warehouses make an attractive target for thieves.

“Urban environments mean more people, which means more potential for crime,” Morneau said. “The logistical realities of urban warehousing also make it more difficult to keep crime out.”

Concentrated areas mean less space for fences and other barriers that limit access. Narrow roadways necessitate smaller delivery trucks which will have to enter and exit the facility more frequently, increasing the opportunities for vandals or thieves to gain entry.

“Your inventory is a critical asset and must be well-secured,” Morneau said.

Around-the-clock security guards and security equipment that includes video surveillance can help to deter thieves, while protocols dictating who can enter the facility and when can help to limit opportunities for criminals.

3. Workforce Safety in Confined Spaces

The tighter floorplans of urban facilities also present safety risks to employees.

“Older facilities with less space won’t have as much automation, which means workers are doing more material handling. That alone increases injury risk,” Morneau said. “Employees are also likely to interface more with forklifts and other machinery, which are also operating in more confined spaces. Whenever people work near this type of machinery, the risk of bodily injury goes up.”

Investing in equipment like conveyer belts and elevators to streamline workflows can help mitigate that risk. Whatever changes are made, thorough safety training for employees is paramount.

4. City Fleet Operations

Cities’ crowded streets and tight corners aren’t built for hulking delivery trucks.

“A benefit of being in an urban warehouse is access to highways and roads, but larger vehicles can’t navigate as easily in a city environment. With more people, vehicles, and distractions on the part of both pedestrians and drivers today, accidents become much more likely,” Morneau said.

The pressure to meet quick delivery timelines could also lead to overscheduling drivers. Not only could this run afoul of regulations, but it can also lead to driver fatigue and a greater likelihood of accidents.

“Warehouse managers need to determine if they can operate effectively with their current fleet and should also consider city ordinances that may limit hours of business operation or affect parking,” Morneau said.

Distributors may also choose to outsource delivery rather than manage their own fleets. In cities, new sharing economy platforms are taking up this task along with traditional players. But farming out delivery to the sharing economy comes with its own liability challenges.

5. Relying on the Sharing Economy for Delivery

The sharing economy is introducing opportunities for businesses of all types to offer better, faster, and more cost-effective service, and the wholesale sector is no exception.

Wholesalers are finding available vehicles and drivers to deliver inventory to client locations via online transportation marketplaces. In the future, gig workers using their own cars and bikes as delivery vehicles could even help wholesalers get packages directly to consumers’ doorsteps. While these services can help expand distribution operations, they can also introduce general liability risks.

“Risk managers may be exposing their companies to a host of emerging liability issues by using sharing economy platforms because the drivers and fleets are relatively unknown,” Morneau said. “A third party is responsible for verifying drivers and their credentials, backgrounds, and vehicles, but you are trusting them to make deliveries. It’s a much harder situation to control.”

These relationships can offer the benefits of speed, efficiency, and capacity, but contracts with third-party platforms should outline service expectations and clearly delineate which party assumes liability.

Access Risk Management Resources and Comprehensive Coverage

Wholesale distributors are already making use of multistory urban warehouses in Europe and Asia, with a few cropping up in U.S. hubs like San Francisco and New York. The trend is likely to continue as e-commerce keeps growing and consumers keep expecting speedy delivery.

Risk managers can best plan and prepare for the unique exposures associated with urban warehouses by working with well-resourced insurers. Liberty Mutual’s risk control consultants can assess property, safety, and fleet risks and recommend strategies to mitigate them, such as developing a fleet safety program, evaluating a new or existing fire protection system, or reviewing an emergency response plan.

“Our risk control team helps risk managers identify the exposures they’ve overlooked so they can bring down their residual risk and focus on operating their businesses profitably,” Morneau said.

Along with core primary property and casualty products, Liberty Mutual also offers specialty coverages like environmental, cyber, and professional policies through Ironshore, a Liberty Mutual company.

“We have the full suite of products to address urban warehousing exposures and help distributors take advantage of these opportunities,” Morneau said.

To learn more, visit https://business.libertymutualgroup.com/business-insurance/industries/wholesale-business-insurance-coverage.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Liberty Mutual Insurance. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Liberty Mutual Insurance offers a wide range of insurance products and services, including general liability, property, commercial automobile, excess casualty and workers compensation.

More from Risk & Insurance

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4 Companies That Rocked It by Treating Injured Workers as Equals; Not Adversaries

The 2018 Teddy Award winners built their programs around people, not claims, and offer proof that a worker-centric approach is a smarter way to operate.
By: | October 30, 2018 • 3 min read

Across the workers’ compensation industry, the concept of a worker advocacy model has been around for a while, but has only seen notable adoption in recent years.

Even among those not adopting a formal advocacy approach, mindsets are shifting. Formerly claims-centric programs are becoming worker-centric and it’s a win all around: better outcomes; greater productivity; safer, healthier employees and a stronger bottom line.

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That’s what you’ll see in this month’s issue of Risk & Insurance® when you read the profiles of the four recipients of the 2018 Theodore Roosevelt Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Award, sponsored by PMA Companies. These four programs put workers front and center in everything they do.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top,” said Steve Legg, director of risk management for Starbucks.

Starbucks put claims reporting in the hands of its partners, an exemplary act of trust. The coffee company also put itself in workers’ shoes to identify and remove points of friction.

That led to a call center run by Starbucks’ TPA and a dedicated telephonic case management team so that partners can speak to a live person without the frustration of ‘phone tag’ and unanswered questions.

“We were focused on building up a program with an eye on our partner experience. Cost was at the bottom of the list. Doing a better job by our partners was at the top.” — Steve Legg, director of risk management, Starbucks

Starbucks also implemented direct deposit for lost-time pay, eliminating stressful wait times for injured partners, and allowing them to focus on healing.

For Starbucks, as for all of the 2018 Teddy Award winners, the approach is netting measurable results. With higher partner satisfaction, it has seen a 50 percent decrease in litigation.

Teddy winner Main Line Health (MLH) adopted worker advocacy in a way that goes far beyond claims.

Employees who identify and report safety hazards can take credit for their actions by sending out a formal “Employee Safety Message” to nearly 11,000 mailboxes across the organization.

“The recognition is pretty cool,” said Steve Besack, system director, claims management and workers’ compensation for the health system.

MLH also takes a non-adversarial approach to workers with repeat injuries, seeing them as a resource for identifying areas of improvement.

“When you look at ‘repeat offenders’ in an unconventional way, they’re a great asset to the program, not a liability,” said Mike Miller, manager, workers’ compensation and employee safety for MLH.

Teddy winner Monmouth County, N.J. utilizes high-tech motion capture technology to reduce the chance of placing new hires in jobs that are likely to hurt them.

Monmouth County also adopted numerous wellness initiatives that help workers manage their weight and improve their wellbeing overall.

“You should see the looks on their faces when their cholesterol is down, they’ve lost weight and their blood sugar is better. We’ve had people lose 30 and 40 pounds,” said William McGuane, the county’s manager of benefits and workers’ compensation.

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Do these sound like minor program elements? The math says otherwise: Claims severity has plunged from $5.5 million in 2009 to $1.3 million in 2017.

At the University of Pennsylvania, putting workers first means getting out from behind the desk and finding out what each one of them is tasked with, day in, day out — and looking for ways to make each of those tasks safer.

Regular observations across the sprawling campus have resulted in a phenomenal number of process and equipment changes that seem simple on their own, but in combination have created a substantially safer, healthier campus and improved employee morale.

UPenn’s workers’ comp costs, in the seven-digit figures in 2009, have been virtually cut in half.

Risk & Insurance® is proud to honor the work of these four organizations. We hope their stories inspire other organizations to be true partners with the employees they depend on. &

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]