Risk Report: Manufacturing

Struggling With Safety Rules

Manufacturers must comply with up to 26 different state safety plans.
By: | April 4, 2016 • 5 min read

Manufacturers that have operations in one or more states have the complex task of complying with either state or federal safety and health standards — and the provisions are not always in alignment.

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Failure to do so means they run the risk of being hit with hefty fines totaling hundreds of thousands — or even millions — of dollars.

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires all companies to meet its regulations as a minimum. However, firms that have operations in one of the 26 states that have adopted their own occupational safety and health rules must also adhere to each state’s rules.

State-run programs are required to meet minimum federal requirements, but often they are more stringent. In many cases, companies operate in multiple states, so they have to subscribe to a range of different standards for each state.

Employers are required only to comply with the state-run program; if there is no state program, they must comply with the federal rules.

To compound this, according to industry sources, federal OSHA has just increased the maximum penalty by nearly 80 percent for failure to comply with its standards, meaning that companies that fail could be hit with a fine of $125,000 or higher for a serious violation.

And with thousands of cases of workplace injuries believed to be unreported every year, federal OSHA is now tightening the net on willful and repeat offenders.

Robert Cartwright, safety and health manager, Bridgestone Retail Operations LLC

Robert Cartwright, safety and health manager, Bridgestone Retail Operations LLC

“State plan standards are often higher or exceed those of federal OSHA,” said Robert Cartwright, safety and health manager for Bridgestone Retail Operations LLC and a board director of RIMS.

“With fire safety, for example, in states like California, where they have had a certain violation or frequency and severity of violation, the state may decide to apply their own set of standards that are tougher than the federal OSHA.

“In my experience, in those particular cases, the fines tend to be higher and the citations more detailed than they would be from the federal authority.”

State vs. Federal OSHA

David Carlson, Marsh’s U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader, said that state plans are often more stringent in terms of enforcement protocols and the composition of their hazard communication programs such as labeling requirements, exposure limits and types of chemical used.

For example, he said, California created a standard specifically focused on reducing and eliminating hazardous chemicals from the workplace. It has significantly tightened up exposure limits and the quantities that can be stored.

Dave Barry, senior vice president and national director of casualty risk control, Willis Towers Watson

Dave Barry, senior vice president and national director of casualty risk control, Willis Towers Watson

Dave Barry, senior vice president and national director of casualty risk control at Willis Towers Watson’s risk control and claims advocacy practice, said California’s state plan requires companies to implement a written injury and illness prevention plan, while federal OSHA does not.

Sometimes, he said, the U.S. regulations will be revised to match state rules, such as the requirement for reporting an amputation, hospitalization or loss of an eye within 24 hours, which had already been in force in states like California for several years.

“The state programs typically focus their efforts on the specific industries in their state, for example if they do a lot of agriculture, whereas federal OSHA standards are not necessarily geared toward one particular industry,” he said.

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He said that regulations often vary widely from state to state.

On the other hand, Mike Heembrock, vice president and executive specialist, risk engineering at Chubb, said that states often fall short of federal OSHA enforcement performance in terms of inspections and fines because of staffing and resource limitations due to budget constraints.

“In general, because of the relatively low salary and operating budgets, states have struggled to recruit new inspectors and often they don’t have as much experience as federal inspectors, so it’s been difficult for them to meet federal OSHA performance criteria,” he said.

Risks for Manufacturers

Carlson said that the biggest risk for manufacturers operating in multiple states is to understand how to comply with different state and federal standards and record-keeping requirements.

“If you have operations, say, in California, Michigan, Oregon or Washington, those

David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader, Marsh

David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader, Marsh

all have their own state plan programs that you need to be aware of and comply with, not to mention the administrative burden and costs associated with complying with federal OSHA in other states where they may operate,” he said.

“That’s a challenge for not only a large manufacturer like Ford or GM, but also for smaller businesses with operations across the U.S.”

Carlson said that oftentimes companies become preoccupied with emerging risks such as cyber and overlook the broader risk of their employees’ health and safety.

“At the end of the day, the largest variable cost of risk for most manufacturers is still the workers’ compensation and employee benefits programs,” he said.

“The problem is that too many employers look at it simply as the cost of doing business; however if they focused on it, that’s the area where they could reduce claims and financially protect their balance sheet.”

Fines and Penalties

U.S. OSHA raised its penalties for the first time in 25 years, by 78 percent last November.

The maximum fine for a serious violation rose from $7,000 to $12,500, and the maximum willful or repeat violation increased from $70,000 to $125,000. State plans are expected to follow suit, taking effect from August this year.

And from now on, the penalties will be increased every year.

“I think we are going to see a lot more of these types of changes as the current administration leaves office,” said Barry.

Adele Abrams, Law Office of Adele L. Abrams

Adele Abrams, Law Office of Adele L. Abrams

“It’s been 25 years since the fee schedule has been increased and now it will be increasing every year, so I think we are going to see more additional requirements along these lines come into force.”

The maximum penalty per citation can also be higher if it is an egregious violation, said Adele Abrams, whose law practice is based in Beltsville, Md.

“If you have, for example, 10 employees working on a conveyor system in your facility and it doesn’t have adequate guards in place to protect them from injury, federal OSHA would usually issue a single citation with a maximum penalty of $70,000,” she said.

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“However, if all of a sudden they decided it was an egregious violation, because there are 10 workers involved, you could be fined up to $700,000, and you would be put into a ‘Severe Violator Enforcement Program’ for at least three years.”

Christine Sullivan, vice president of risk control services at Lockton, said manufacturers should “avail themselves of the relevant programs that federal OSHA provides.”

“There are a lot of programs and resources out there than can help a risk manager to identify the pitfalls and build a thorough and reliable safety program.” &

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

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Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

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John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]