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NWCDC Chairman's Message

NWCDC Topic ‘Wish List’ Released

If you're still weighing options for a speaker proposal for this year's NWCDC, the selection team is offering a broad range of suggestions.
By: | February 13, 2017 • 3 min read

The team that selects speakers for the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference & Expo has released a “wish list” of topics they would like to hear presented during this year’s event, December 6-8, at Mandalay Bay in Las Vegas.

Workers’ compensation and non-occupational disability management professionals wanting to speak during the 26th Annual NWCDC might review the list to see whether those topics match your area of expertise. If so, consider submitting a request for proposal describing your related presentation concept.

But NWCDC’s speaker decision process is not limited to choosing only the topics on the list below. Potential speakers are encouraged to apply their own creativity and expert knowledge to submit additional presentation ideas. The selection group is dedicated to considering proposals from topics across the industry spectrum.

March 10 is the deadline for submitting RFPs

Submitting multiple RFPs is acceptable. Doing so increases your chances of being selected to present and can help distinguish your proposals when NWCDC receives multiple RFPs containing the same general topic idea. For instance, we can only select a limited number of presentations discussing pharmacy management.

So if you desire to speak on pharmacy management, for example, you might submit an RFP on that topic in addition to RFPs on other workers’ comp and non-occupational disability management subjects.

In choosing topics and speakers, the selection committee prefers presenters offering practical solutions that help workers’ comp and disability claims payers and managers resolve difficult and commonly-faced challenges. While we place an emphasis on presentations with practical solutions, there is also room for discussions that enlighten on current trends impacting workers’ comp and disability management.

NWCDC prioritizes proposals that include employers as a presenters. We have learned that our attendees prefer to hear case studies presented by employers that have adopted successful strategies rather than sales pitches offered by service providers.

We also understand, however, that not all presentations can include an employer speaker and we value the knowledge and information that other workers’ comp professionals serving the payer community bring to the conference.

Presentation proposals can focus on new, innovative strategies that reduce injuries and costs. But risk managers, workers’ comp managers, and disability managers are also welcome, for example, to share their experiences with implementing tried-and-true practices at their companies.

NWCDC’s selection committee includes Denise Algire, director, managed care & disability corporate risk at Albertsons Companies; Bill Wainscott, manager, workers’ compensation and occupational health at International Paper; Dan Reynolds, editor-in-chief at Risk & Insurance; and Roberto Ceniceros, NWCDC chair and senior editor at Risk & Insurance®.

Presentation proposal topics that NWCDC’s speaker selection committee are eager to evaluate and select from include:

  • HIPAA compliance in managing workers’ compensation claims and safety
  • OSHA regulations and strategies for post-accident drug testing
  • Leveraging an employee assistance program for workers’ comp and disability claims
  • To settle or not settle open claims involving active employees
  • Strategies for managing cumulative trauma claims occurring in multiple jurisdictions
  • Broker and insurer perspectives on managing claims and vendors
  • Strategies for cross-examining medical providers
  • ADA, EEOC and FMLA compliance topics
  • Preventing and managing contractor and temp worker claims
  • Truly engaging medical providers, not just ranking them
  • Employers describing how they implemented claims-advocacy programs
  • Employer perspectives on how analytics or predictive modeling were applied to impact outcomes
  • Injury and claims reporting using apps
  • Total worker health impacting occupational and non-occupational claims
  • Leveraging the role of TPA claims supervisors
  • Nurse and employer perspectives on case management used to facilitate optimal outcomes
  • Distracted driving safety initiatives
  • Regulators’ perspective on changes occurring in key states

New this year, NWCDC is adding a technology session track that will create opportunities for additional speakers.

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In addition to the technology-themed ideas mentioned above — such as injury reporting using apps and employer strategies for applying predictive modeling — other potential technology discussions include telematics use, telemedicine, wearables for safety and claims management, and the state of systems allowing employees to apply for benefits electronically, ask questions, and submit forms.

Questions about submitting speaker RFPs can be directed to Roberto Ceniceros, conference chair, at 208 957-8705 or at [email protected].

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession: Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]