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Public Sector Risk

Public Sector Upgrading Cyber Security

States have launched initiatives ranging from cyber academies and public-private partnerships to dashboards, and cyber preparedness and response plans.
By: | October 28, 2016 • 5 min read

Public sector risk managers and experts alike say much more needs to be done about cyber security to translate awareness into concrete actions that protect sensitive data.

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Only one-third (29 percent) of IT managers in state governments provide their governors with monthly reports on cyber security, compared with only 17 percent in 2014, according to a joint report from Deloitte and the National Association of State Chief Information Officers (NASCIO).

That level of communication has not yet extended to state legislatures, according to the study, “State Governments at Risk: Turning Strategy and Awareness into Progress,” which surveyed 96 state business and elected officials.

Nearly one-third of respondents said they “never communicate” with their legislatures, unchanged from 2014 — which is “an important consideration, given the legislature’s role in appropriating funds,” according to the report.

Still, many states are starting to act and make progress in areas visible to governors.

More than half (54 percent) of respondents said they have implemented at least some of the cyber security recommendations by the National Governors Association, compared with only one-third (33 percent) in 2014.

Mark Raymond, chief information officer, State of Connecticut

Mark Raymond, chief information officer, State of Connecticut

Governors in a number of states have launched initiatives ranging from state cyber academies and public-private partnerships to dashboards, and preparedness and response plans.

The 2016 survey results are the first time there is “some significant traction around the issue,” said Mark Raymond, chief information officer for the State of Connecticut and president of the National Association of State Chief Information Officers based in Lexington, Ken.

“It’s not just about the increased risk and threat, but there are states that are making positive progress in articulating a strategy to increase awareness around what they are doing to reduce the risk,” Raymond said.

Public entities need to take a hard look at all of their computer technology — both hardware and software — and question the totality of access and whether each individual’s access is necessary and appropriate, said Marilyn Rivers, risk manager for the city of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

“Risk managers need to take a trip to their server rooms and examine the security and access,” Rivers said. “Ask about password control and the regular backup of the information that flows throughout their organizations on an hourly and daily basis.

“Ask how your organization protects itself from all the hand-held mobile devices your employees use or the laptops taken home for work projects,” she said.

She said public sector risk managers should have a plan for what would happen if information stops flowing throughout the organization. Do you have a backup separate from the live system? Can your government recreate itself if held hostage?

Rivers also said public sector risk managers should examine access to websites, including which websites are visited by employees and what tracking cookies are involved.

“Every public entity is facing an urgent cyber crisis that is dynamic and in constant change,” Rivers said. “It is vitally important to all of us as we govern collectively to identify our network access and vulnerabilities and invest in technology and people to assist us in managing this global risk frontier.”

Barry Scott, deputy director of finance and risk manager, City of Philadelphia

Barry Scott, deputy director of finance and risk manager, City of Philadelphia

It is also important for public sector risk managers to invest in a comprehensive insurance program that assists in mitigating and managing the cost of the risks their governmental entity faces, she said.

Barry Scott, deputy director of finance and risk manager for the City of Philadelphia, said that it’s critical that his team strives “to ensure that every city department bears the responsibility for managing information correctly.”

“The first layer is trying to make sure that people are smart in how they manage the information we have about residents and businesses in the city, and storing the information in the proper format,” Scott said. “That helps work with the IT layer, so that appropriate security can be placed to protect that information.”

The public sector also faces a somewhat unique set of challenges — in order to add more resources to the organization’s capabilities, the tax base needs to be engaged, he said.

“Our citizens need to be aware that the services they seek, namely, the ease of access to their information that automated systems bring, have some issues in terms of security and protection — and those services have a cost which we as citizens have to bear,” Scott said.

“One of our biggest challenges as a public entity with finite resources is getting the best value in our resources — and in an increasingly digital world, cyber security is a priority.”

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Raymond of NASCIO recommended that IT professionals and risk management departments in the public sector measure where their organizations are on the “cyber risk scale,” what kind of data they have and how they are protecting it.

“You can’t improve the things that are you are not measuring,” Raymond said. “Once you understand the value of that data, you need to determine what controls are needed to be put in place to protect the data.”

Then IT and risk management need to articulate their strategies to the executive management team in a way that enables them to understand both the threat and the efforts around it in a concise manner, he said.

Once executive management clearly understands what can be done about cyber security risks, they can appropriately prioritize resources to reduce exposure.

“States not only have to mitigate for financial risk of data loss or theft from state accounts, but also for the loss of data containing people’s personal information from many sources like birth and death certificates,” Raymond said.

Kristin Judge, director of special projects, National Cyber security Alliance

Kristin Judge, director of special projects, National Cyber security Alliance

“State governments also need to be aware of how cyber attacks can result in lost productivity, lost trust of government, and increased risk of bad decisions — such as a cyber criminals directing the state to let someone out of jail who isn’t supposed to be, or putting someone in jail that’s not supposed to be there.”

Kristin Judge, director of special projects at the National Cyber Security Alliance in Washington, D.C., said her group stresses to public sector risk managers that they must communicate that their entire governmental organization has responsibility for cyber security, and that all workers must be part of the solution.

“We want people to create a culture of cyber security, and just as they have fire drills, they should also have cyber security drills like checking the quality of backups and the process for restoring data, for example,” Judge said.

“It’s also very important to have training, as 90 percent of attacks do not come from sophisticated code meant to break through IT security systems, but rather from employees just clicking on phishing emails — so 90 percent of attacks can be stopped by trained staff.”

Katie Kuehner-Hebert is a freelance writer based in California. She has more than two decades of journalism experience and expertise in financial writing. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Report: Manufacturing

More Robots Enter Into Manufacturing Industry

With more jobs utilizing technology advancements, manufacturing turns to cobots to help ease talent gaps.
By: | May 1, 2018 • 6 min read

The U.S. manufacturing industry is at a crossroads.

Faced with a shortfall of as many as two million workers between now and 2025, the sector needs to either reinvent itself by making it a more attractive career choice for college and high school graduates or face extinction. It also needs to shed its image as a dull, unfashionable place to work, where employees are stuck in dead-end repetitive jobs.

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Added to that are the multiple risks caused by the increasing use of automation, sensors and collaborative robots (cobots) in the manufacturing process, including product defects and worker injuries. That’s not to mention the increased exposure to cyber attacks as manufacturers and their facilities become more globally interconnected through the use of smart technology.

If the industry wishes to continue to move forward at its current rapid pace, then manufacturers need to work with schools, governments and the community to provide educational outreach and apprenticeship programs. They must change the perception of the industry and attract new talent. They also need to understand and to mitigate the risks presented by the increased use of technology in the manufacturing process.

“Loss of knowledge due to movement of experienced workers, negative perception of the manufacturing industry and shortages of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) and skilled production workers are driving the talent gap,” said Ben Dollar, principal, Deloitte Consulting.

“The risks associated with this are broad and span the entire value chain — [including]  limitations to innovation, product development, meeting production goals, developing suppliers, meeting customer demand and quality.”

The Talent Gap

Manufacturing companies are rapidly expanding. With too few skilled workers coming in to fill newly created positions, the talent gap is widening. That has been exacerbated by the gradual drain of knowledge and expertise as baby boomers retire and a decline in technical education programs in public high schools.

Ben Dollar, principal, Deloitte Consulting

“Most of the millennials want to work for an Amazon, Google or Yahoo, because they seem like fun places to work and there’s a real sense of community involvement,” said Dan Holden, manager of corporate risk and insurance, Daimler Trucks North America. “In contrast, the manufacturing industry represents the ‘old school’ where your father and grandfather used to work.

“But nothing could be further from the truth: We offer almost limitless opportunities in engineering and IT, working in fields such as electric cars and autonomous driving.”

To dispel this myth, Holden said Daimler’s Educational Outreach Program assists qualified organizations that support public high school educational programs in STEM, CTE (career technical education) and skilled trades’ career development.

It also runs weeklong technology schools in its manufacturing facilities to encourage students to consider manufacturing as a vocation, he said.

“It’s all essentially a way of introducing ourselves to the younger generation and to present them with an alternative and rewarding career choice,” he said. “It also gives us the opportunity to get across the message that just because we make heavy duty equipment doesn’t mean we can’t be a fun and educational place to work.”

Rise of the Cobot

Automation undoubtedly helps manufacturers increase output and improve efficiency by streamlining production lines. But it’s fraught with its own set of risks, including technical failure, a compromised manufacturing process or worse — shutting down entire assembly lines.

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More technologically advanced machines also require more skilled workers to operate and maintain them. Their absence can in turn hinder the development of new manufacturing products and processes.

Christina Villena, vice president of risk solutions, The Hanover Insurance Group, said the main risk of using cobots is bodily injury to their human coworkers. These cobots are robots that share a physical workspace and interact with humans. To overcome the problem of potential injury, Villena said, cobots are placed in safety cages or use force-limited technology to prevent hazardous contact.

“With advancements in technology, such as the Cloud, there are going to be a host of cyber and other risks associated with them.” — David Carlson, U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader, Marsh

“Technology must be in place to prevent cobots from exerting excessive force against a human or exposing them to hazardous tools or chemicals,” she said. “Traditional robots operate within a safety cage to prevent dangerous contact. Failure or absence of these guards has led to injuries and even fatalities.”

The increasing use of interconnected devices and the Cloud to control and collect data from industrial control systems can also leave manufacturers exposed to hacking, said David Carlson, Marsh’s U.S. manufacturing and automobile practice leader. Given the relatively new nature of cyber as a risk, however, he said coverage is still a gray area that must be assessed further.

“With advancements in technology, such as the Cloud, there are going to be a host of cyber and other risks associated with them,” he said. “Therefore, companies need to think beyond the traditional risks, such as workers’ compensation and product liability.”

Another threat, said Bill Spiers, vice president, risk control consulting practice leader, Lockton Companies, is any malfunction of the software used to operate cobots. Then there is the machine not being able to cope with the increased workload when production is ramped up, he said.

“If your software goes wrong, it can stop the machine working or indeed the whole manufacturing process,” he said. “[Or] you might have a worker who is paid by how much they can produce in an hour who decides to turn up the dial, causing the machine to go into overdrive and malfunction.”

Potential Solutions

Spiers said risk managers need to produce a heatmap of their potential exposures in the workplace attached to the use of cobots in the manufacturing process, including safety and business interruption. This can also extend to cyber liability, he said.

“You need to understand the risk, if it’s controllable and, indeed, if it’s insurable,” he said. “By carrying out a full risk assessment, you can determine all of the relevant issues and prioritize them accordingly.”

By using collective learning to understand these issues, Joseph Mayo, president, JW Mayo Consulting, said companies can improve their safety and manufacturing processes.

“Companies need to work collaboratively as an industry to understand this new technology and the problems associated with it.” — Joseph Mayo, president, JW Mayo Consulting

“Companies need to work collaboratively as an industry to understand this new technology and the problems associated with it,” Mayo said. “They can also use detective controls to anticipate these issues and react accordingly by ensuring they have the appropriate controls and coverage in place to deal with them.”

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Manufacturing risks today extend beyond traditional coverage, like workers’ compensation, property, equipment breakdown, automobile, general liability and business interruption, to new risks, such as cyber liability.

It’s key to use a specialized broker and carrier with extensive knowledge and experience of the industry’s unique risks.

Stacie Graham, senior vice president and general manager, Liberty Mutual’s national insurance central division, said there are five key steps companies need to take to protect themselves and their employees against these risks. They include teaching them how to use the equipment properly, maintaining the same high quality of product and having a back-up location, as well as having the right contractual insurance policy language in place and plugging any potential coverage gaps.

“Risk managers need to work closely with their broker and carrier to make sure that they have the right contractual controls in place,” she said. “Secondly, they need to carry out on-site visits to make sure that they have the right safety practices and to identify the potential claims that they need to mitigate against.” &

Alex Wright is a U.K.-based business journalist, who previously was deputy business editor at The Royal Gazette in Bermuda. You can reach him at [email protected]