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Public-Private Partnerships: Paving the Way for Infrastructure Revitalization

Many factors for infrastructure projects that are seemingly coming together could signal the dawn of a P3 Golden Age.
By: | March 1, 2017 • 5 min read

Public-private partnerships (P3s) are an effective way to get complex and expensive transportation infrastructure projects done at a time when political will to invest public funds fall short.

While the approach has been successfully utilized for many different projects, overall adoption remains limited. Out of the United States’ total annual infrastructure spend of $1.2 trillion, roughly $20-25 billion goes toward P3 projects, or about 2 percent.

Part of what has kept P3 to this niche is a dependence on toll-based revenue structures. But new revenue approaches such as Availability Payments could make the model work for a much broader scope of projects, including social infrastructure like hospitals and public schools.

“The insurance community, construction community, and finance community all have an interest here. These three industries could get aligned and work together to help promote P3s as a potential alternative solution for what needs to get built and rebuilt and improved in the next five to 10 years,” said Thomas Grandmaison, executive vice president, Energy and Construction Industry Leader, AIG.

P3s come with a set of both benefits and risks, but new financing approaches combined with an evolving political climate that seems to favor infrastructure investments could be the dawn of a P3 Golden Age.

New Revenue Structures

Developments in finance structures and insurance coverage make P3s more attractive for both public and private partners.

Roads built under a P3 model have typically generated revenue from tolls. The financing of these projects is therefore based on traffic forecasts that estimate the number of cars using the road every day, over a period of 30 to 50 years.

And when those forecasts are inaccurate, the entire project is put in jeopardy. In 2016, SH 130 Concession Co., the private entity that financed, constructed and maintained State Highway 130 — a 41-mile toll road connecting Austin and Seguin in Texas— filed for bankruptcy. The project cost $1.3 billion. SH 130 tried to attract drivers with a high speed limit of 85 mph and an alternative route around other gridlocked highways, but motorists ultimately opted for longer commutes that required no toll payment.

In California, the 10-mile South Bay Expressway suffered the same fate, declaring bankruptcy in 2011. Same for the privately operated Indiana Toll Road, which went bankrupt in 2014.

That’s why availability payments have become increasingly popular.

With availability payments, the public entity issues a periodic payment of a predetermined amount to the private partner as long as the project is available for its intended use at the expected performance level. In this arrangement, the public partner collects any tolls and retains the risk that revenue may not meet expected levels. These arrangements help to attract private partners who don’t want to take on traffic risk, but also allows public sponsors to retain some ownership and control over the road going forward. Availability payments can also enable non-transportation P3 projects, including water treatment plants, ports and public facilities like hospitals and schools.

“There is no shortage of interest in private financing,” Grandmaison said. “There’s plenty of capital out there, and now potential financiers can feel more secure in their investment. The availability payment option often provides the difference between investment grade, and non-investment grade debt, dramatically reducing the cost of debt and increasing the number of potential investors.”

Evolving Risk Management

Insurance coverage plays a part in that security as well, and carriers have been pushed to build creative and flexible solutions to accommodate the size and complexity of P3s. Current trends and P3 project structures need sureties providing alternative solutions that incorporate liquidity elements that can address both concessionaire and rating agency concerns.

“As P3s become more prevalent, builder concessionaire teams and brokers will be asking the insurance market to think more holistically about how separate coverages can be brought together in a coordinated and aligned fashion to make the buying process more streamlined,” Grandmaison said.

There may be multiple large contractors working on a P3 project, and none wants to take the entire program onto their balance sheet. Same goes for the mix of private investors involved. And then there’s the public entity that wants full insurance protection even though they take a back seat in terms of project management and execution.

“You’re creating a six-headed monster as the owner or sponsor of the insurance program,” Grandmaison said. “It’s a more complex risk assumption than the traditional setup where the public entity is responsible for insuring construction, but takes on operation of the project through a separate program.”

Complete and coordinated coverage for all of the risks involved in complex projects alleviates fears — held by both public and private parties — that one entity will be more exposed than their partners, or that risk will be allocated unfairly. For P3s to be executed smoothly, it’s critical to have insurers involved that have the full breadth of experience and capabilities to fill this need. In addition, not all insurers are comfortable with project terms that are often longer than 5 years (sometimes 8-10 years), and providing operational coverage during course of construction or post construction.

AIG is one of few insurers that can provide all of the coverages traditionally needed for construction projects like workers’ compensation, general liability, builder’s risk, inland marine, environmental, professional liability, surety and even some ancillary coverage like cyber and kidnap and ransom.

Political Considerations

Despite their big benefits, P3s also come with significant hurdles. Even with a shifting government agenda that prioritizes infrastructure, local political will can still be difficult to muster.

If a P3 project doesn’t pan out, taxpayers end up paying the balance. Local governments sometimes struggle to justify such costly projects that potentially place their constituents’ wallets at risk. To overcome that hesitance, political leaders want to be assured that their private partner has the capacity to stay with a project over its long lifespan.

“One of the challenges we’ve seen here in the States is that Departments of Transportation want to ensure that the companies that are contracted to keep the project running for up to 30 years actually remain in place,” he said. “There is hesitance to transfer that ownership over to a party that may want to cash out as soon the market shifts.”

Of course, having comprehensive insurance coverage alleviates fears for public sponsors as well.

“AIG is really a full service carrier that can provide everything a customer might need on a project-specific basis,” Grandmaison said. “AIG has been in the market of flexibility and creativity for years and will continue to be so.”

The future certainly looks promising for P3, and the insurance industry looks poised to face any new challenges it brings.

To learn more about insurance solutions for P3 projects, visit http://www.aig.com/business/insurance.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with AIG. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




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More from Risk & Insurance

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2018 Risk All Stars

Stop Mitigating Risk. Start Conquering It Like These 2018 Risk All Stars

The concept of risk mastery and ownership, as displayed by the 2018 Risk All Stars, includes not simply seeking to control outcomes but taking full responsibility for them.
By: | September 14, 2018 • 3 min read

People talk a lot about how risk managers can get a seat at the table. The discussion implies that the risk manager is an outsider, striving to get the ear or the attention of an insider, the CEO or CFO.

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But there are risk managers who go about things in a different way. And the 2018 Risk All Stars are prime examples of that.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Goodyear’s Craig Melnick had only been with the global tire maker a few months when Hurricane Harvey dumped a record amount of rainfall on Houston.

Brilliant communication between Melnick and his new teammates gave him timely and valuable updates on the condition of manufacturing locations. Melnick remained in Akron, mastering the situation by moving inventory out of the storm’s path and making sure remediation crews were lined up ahead of time to give Goodyear its best leg up once the storm passed and the flood waters receded.

Goodyear’s resiliency in the face of the storm gave it credibility when it went to the insurance markets later that year for renewals. And here is where we hear a key phrase, produced by Kevin Garvey, one of Goodyear’s brokers at Aon.

“The markets always appreciate a risk manager who demonstrates ownership,” Garvey said, in what may be something of an understatement.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Dianne Howard, a 2018 Risk All Star and the director of benefits and risk management for the Palm Beach County School District, achieved ownership of $50 million in property storm exposures for the district.

With FEMA saying it wouldn’t pay again for district storm losses it had already paid for, Howard went to the London markets and was successful in getting coverage. She also hammered out a deal in London that would partially reimburse the district if it suffered a mass shooting and needed to demolish a building, like what happened at Sandy Hook in Connecticut.

2018 Risk All Star Jim Cunningham was well-versed enough to know what traditional risk management theories would say when hospitality workers were suffering too many kitchen cuts. “Put a cut-prevention plan in place,” is the traditional wisdom.

But Cunningham, the vice president of risk management for the gaming company Pinnacle Entertainment, wasn’t satisfied with what looked to him like a Band-Aid approach.

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Instead, he used predictive analytics, depending on his own team to assemble company-specific data, to determine which safety measures should be used company wide. The result? Claims frequency at the company dropped 60 percent in the first year of his program.

Alumine Bellone, a 2018 Risk All Star and the vice president of risk management for Ardent Health Services, faced an overwhelming task: Create a uniform risk management program when her hospital group grew from 14 hospitals in three states to 31 hospitals in seven.

Bellone owned the situation by visiting each facility right before the acquisition and again right after, to make sure each caregiving population was ready to integrate into a standardized risk management system.

After consolidating insurance policies, Bellone achieved $893,000 in synergies.

In each of these cases, and in more on the following pages, we see examples of risk managers who weren’t just knocking on the door; they were owning the room. &

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Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, clarity of vision and passion.

See the complete list of 2018 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]