2222222222

Sponsored Content by Fiserv

Not Ready for Insurtech? Here’s Proven Automation You Can Use Now!

Digitizing your financial close and eliminating the highlighters and spreadsheets can drive real bottom-line savings that are hard to ignore.
By: | December 1, 2017 • 5 min read

Sure, insurtech sounds great – who doesn’t want to modernize labor-intensive and time-consuming insurance processes, from underwriting and distribution to claims and customer service? But the truth is, this naturally risk -averse industry will adopt changes only cautiously and strategically, and very few new technologies have been road-tested enough to demonstrate lasting impact.

And of course, regulators will have a significant say on what is permissible.

But while the trend unfolds, automation has been proven to cut inefficiencies and streamline workflows. The industry’s administrative functions are undeniably laden with overhead costs associated with paper-based processes that demand copious time, labor and materials.

Why not pick one essential process – reconciliation – where automation can make a significant impact on the bottom line and reduce the risk of compliance misses and mistakes.

“In the insurance industry, every fraction of a cent that can be saved in time, resources, processing and operations goes directly to the bottom line,” said Renata Sheyner, senior product manager of Frontier™ Reconciliation, the end-to-end reconciliation and certification solution offered by Fiserv.

“Additionally, the more data that insurers add to their business and analyze through relatively untested insurtech innovations, the greater the need for automated, reliable transaction-level operational and balance sheet reconciliation.”

Why Automate Reconciliation?

Renata Sheyner, Senior Product Manager

Most companies currently reconcile their books with two tools — a highlighter and a spreadsheet.

“I have seen conference rooms filled with filing cabinets to be sorted through,” Sheyner said. “Sometimes I ask potential clients, ‘How many different colored highlighters are in your desk drawer?’ Because that’s how it’s done without automation – highlighting items on printed reports, or using Excel spreadsheets to keep track of everything.”

Without automation, reconciliation at the transaction level can be a time- and labor-intensive process that leaves more room for human error. And errors increase the risk of running afoul of regulations. Reducing the risk of error in the books can save companies thousands in non-compliance fines when it’s time for an audit.

“A lot of CFOs are now personally liable for misrepresentation of financial statements. There are some pretty significant implications of non-compliance and not having your books complete,” Sheyner said. “There’s a huge benefit in incorporating all of your documentation into a system with built-in internal and external audit controls.”

In an intensely regulated industry, the importance of accuracy and transparency can’t be overstated.

Integration of data and matching transactions using an automated solution can cut the risk of error by as much as 50 percent, while allowing a more holistic and transparent view into the financial close process. An automated system with built-in audit controls can also ensure that standards dictated by Dodd-Frank and Sarbanes-Oxley Act are met.

A centralized view of transactions and the overall reconciliation lifecycle also makes it easier to mitigate the risks of fraud and write-offs related to unexplained exceptions. End-to-end reconciliation automation, combined with data agnosticism, identifies and resolves more exceptions. This can lead to an overall 75 percent reduction in write-offs.

“Insurers need a data-agnostic tool that can pull in massive amounts of disparate data around claims, policyholder details, equity fund balances, payment and disbursement statuses and more, and funnel it through an automated matching system to pair the right data with the right transaction,” Sheyner said.

Frontier Reconciliation provides that very detailed transaction matching, and can match data fields on a one-to-one, one-to-many, or many-to-many basis. Transaction-level matching with multiple fields reduces the need for manual intervention, “which allows employees to spend their time on value-added tasks like managing or investigating exceptions,” Sheyner said.

Among Frontier Reconciliation users, reducing manual tasks and implementing automated reconciliation can experience a 60 – 80 percent gain in efficiency.

The cost savings are also hard to ignore. On average, financial companies using an automated reconciliation solution save 25 percent on audits by providing electronic access to accounts and required approvals.

Taking paper out of the equation also saves the costs of buying paper and printing materials, reduces the manpower and hours needed to process records, and can speed up financial close by two to four days, on average.

“We frequently help accounting and finance teams build a strong internal business case for automated reconciliation and certification to present to senior management,” Sheyner said.

In addition to mitigating risks from non-compliance, fraud, and write-offs, an automated reconciliation process can also head off reputation risk.

“The reputational risk from restatement may not be monetary initially, but over time can certainly hurt an organization pretty severely within the market among their policyholders, peers and regulators,” Sheyner said.

Case in Point

Several large multi-line insurers in the U.S. rely on Frontier Reconciliation, including a top 10 multi-line carrier with over $43 billion in direct premiums written (DPW) who has trusted Frontier Reconciliation for the past 10 years.

“When they implemented Frontier Reconciliation a decade ago, they had a team of 40 people working on 300 reconciliations a day using Excel worksheets. Since automating the process, they’ve been able to refocus the team to eight who now manage more than 3,000 reconciliations a day,” Sheyner said. “And those other employees have been able to focus on other valuable strategic projects – ones they were hired to manage.”

Frontier Reconciliation also helps this leading Fortune 100 carrier match policyholders with premium payment data —like what type of payment was received, who received it and in what form (check, ACH, direct debit) — and track other information like claims data, coverage and payout limits, and outstanding disbursements.

“They can see in real time exactly how many outstanding payments there are and how many disbursements have been made. They can check on aging claims, which is important because the longer the claim sits open, typically the more expensive it gets,” Sheyner said. “If something is outstanding for 30 days, they can ensure processes are in place to bring those files to a close.”

Stronger compliance, reduced costs, and potentially faster claims closing … these are the insurtech promises that an automated reconciliation solution can bring to the industry today.

To learn more, visit: Frontier Reconciliation for Insurers.

 SponsoredContent

BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Fiserv. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Fiserv, Inc. enables clients worldwide to create and deliver financial services experiences that are in step with the way people live and work today. For more than 30 years, Fiserv has been a trusted leader in financial services technology, helping clients achieve best-in-class results by driving quality and innovation in payments, processing services, risk and compliance, customer and channel management, and insights and optimization.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

The Profession

Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Advertisement




I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

Advertisement




Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Advertisement




A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]