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2016 Risk All Star: Scott Clark

Withstanding the Storm

The impact of a hurricane or severe windstorm can be devastating.

The risk of damage to your property is even greater if you’re in a hurricane-prone state like Florida, as in the case of Miami-Dade County Public Schools (M-DCPS).

risk and benefits officer, Miami-Dade County Public Schools (recently retired)

Scott Clark, risk and benefits officer, Miami-Dade County Public Schools (recently retired)

Between 2004 and 2014, M-DCPS, which owns $10 billion worth of property, received more than $30 million in assistance from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for damage caused by windstorms or hurricanes.

But last year, FEMA published new guidance that essentially reduced funding for properties that had received assistance in the past. If damage was caused by the same peril, FEMA would reduce its assistance by the amount required for the previous disaster, regardless of the deductible.

That’s where Scott Clark, the recently retired risk and benefits officer of M-CDPS, stepped in. To plug the gap, Clark drew up a three-year program with Swiss Re based on a parametric model of coverage.

The new “storm policy,” effective from May 1, provided a limit of $10 million per loss, with a three-year aggregate limit of $20 million. The policy is triggered by wind speeds in excess of 87.5 mph on a weighted basis.

M-DCPS is believed to be the only public entity in the U.S. that has purchased such coverage to address its FEMA shortfall.

This was in addition to a rolling three-year base windstorm property policy that provided a 10 percent to 15 percent no-claims bonus for every storm-free year, net of commissions.

“The problem was that at the time we didn’t have the ability to secure coverage for every property, and we were already spending $25 million to $30 million on property insurance as it was,” said Clark, who is a former Risk and Insurance Management Society president and director.

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“So we started looking at the alternatives and that is where we brought in Swiss Re. They came up with a solution that would monitor wind speeds across all of the ZIP codes that our properties were in.

“Provided there was a sustained wind speed of 87.5mph in that area and we could provide out of pocket expenses, the policy would be triggered and pay out $10 million per loss.”

“The problem was that at the time we didn’t have the ability to secure coverage for every property, and we were already spending $25 million to $30 million on property insurance as it was.” — Scott Clark, recently retired risk and benefits officer, Miami-Dade County Public Schools

He added: “Over the last years, since there have been no significant windstorms, year after year we have made savings of 10 percent to 15 percent in the property marketplace through the no-claims bonus.

“On top of that, we have seen a 10 percent to 12 percent increase in the total insurable value of our properties, translating into an overall saving of 20 percent every year.”

“Scott is one of those amazing people who can jump from topic to topic,” said Kathy Silver, vice president at Insurance Consultants. “One minute he can discuss a complex health insurance problem, then walk into a property insurance meeting and not miss a beat. He consistently challenged himself and the people he worked with to consider new solutions and ideas.” &

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AllStars2016v1oRisk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, perseverance and passion.

See the complete list of 2016 Risk All Stars.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

The risk manager for Boyd Gaming Corp. says curiosity keeps him engaged, and continual education will be the key to managing emerging risks.
By: | May 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was trained as an accountant, worked in public accounting and became a CPA. Being comfortable with numbers is helpful in my current role, and obviously, the language of business is financial statements, so it helps.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Working in finance in the corporate environment included the review of budgets and the analysis of business expenses. I quickly found the area of benefits and insurance — and how “accepting risk” impacted those expenses — to be fascinating. I asked a lot of questions. Be careful what you ask for — I soon found myself responsible for those insurance areas and haven’t looked back!

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I have found the risk management community to be a close-knit group, whether that’s industry professionals, risk managers with other companies or support organizations like RIMS and other regional groups. The expertise of the carriers and specialty vendors to develop new products and programs, along with the appropriate education, will continue to be of key importance to companies going forward.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

As I’m sure many in the insurance field would agree, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 changed our world and our industry. It was a particularly intense time and certainly a baptism by fire for people like me who were relatively new to the industry. This event clearly accelerated the switch to the acceptance of more risk, which impacted mitigation strategies and programs.

Bob Berglund, vice president, benefits and insurance, Boyd Gaming Corp.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

The fast-paced threat that cyber security represents today. Our company, like so many companies, is reliant upon computers, software and IT expertise in our everyday existence. This new risk has forged an even stronger relationship between risk management and our IT department as we work together to address this growing threat.

Additionally, the shooting event in Las Vegas in 2017 will have an enduring impact on firms that host large gatherings and arena-style events all over the world, and our company is no exception.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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With the various types of insurance programs we employ, I have been fortunate to work with most of the large national and international carriers — all of whom employ talented people with a vast array of resources.

R&I:  How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We use brokers for many of our professional coverages, such as property, casualty, D&O and cyber. We are self-insured under our health plans, with close to 25,000 members. We tend to manage those programs internally and utilize direct relationships with carriers and specialty vendors to tailor a plan that works best for team members.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I have been fortunate to have worked alongside some smart and insightful people during my career. A key piece of advice, said in many different ways, has served me well. Simply stated: “Seek to understand before being understood.”

What this has meant to me is try everything you can to learn about something, new or old. After you have gained this knowledge, you can begin to access and maybe suggest changes or adjustments. Being curious has always been a personal enjoyment for me in business, and I have found people are more than willing to lend a hand, offer information and advice — you just need to ask. Building those alliances and foundations of knowledge on a subject matter makes tackling the future more exciting and fruitful.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Our benefit health plan is much more than handing out an insurance card at the beginning of the year. We encourage our team members and their families to learn about their personal health, get engaged in a variety of health and wellness programs and try to live life in the healthiest possible way. The result of that is literally hundreds of testimonials from our members every year on how they have lost weight, changed their lifestyle and gotten off medications. It is extremely rewarding and is a testament to [our] close-knit corporate culture.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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Some will remember the volcano eruption in Iceland in spring of 2010. I was just finishing a week of meetings in London with Lloyd’s syndicates related to our property insurance placement when the airspace in England and most of northern Europe was shut down — no airplanes in or out! Flights were ultimately canceled for the following five days. Therefore, with a few other stranded visitors like myself, we experimented and tried out new restaurants every day until we could leave. It was a very interesting time!

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

I am originally from Canada, and I played ice hockey from the time I was four years old up until quite recently. Too many surgeries sadly forced my recent retirement.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

That’s a funny one … I am a CPA working in the casino industry, doing insurance and risk management, so neighbors and acquaintances think I either do tax returns or they think I’m a blackjack dealer at the casino!




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]