Risk Insider: Marilyn Rivers

Volunteerism in the Public Sector

By: | April 19, 2017 • 3 min read
Marilyn Rivers is director of risk and safety for the City of Saratoga Springs. She chairs the PRIMA Institute for the Public Risk Management Association and was named Public Risk Manager of the Year by PRIMA in 2007. The views expressed in this article are those of the author, and not necessarily of the employer. She can be reached at [email protected]

Our public entity dollars are short with no relief in sight, as tax caps remain stagnant and public officials promise to slash the tax base further.

Yet governance costs continue to escalate with mandatory contractual and retirement increases. In order to fulfill our public mandates, public entities across the nation are accomplishing municipal goals by engaging in Public Private Partnerships and beginning creative relationships with community organizations.

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It’s helpful that baby boomers are aging gracefully. As young activists, we insisted on change in society, championed the environment, helped advance technology and introduced the foundations of global social media — just to name a few.

We’re shredding the image of the couch potato by abandoning simplistic leisure sports and actively seeking to give back to the world by saving wildlife, vacation volunteering and participating in community programs to fill the void left by shrinking tax dollars.

Generational community activism and public need have the beginnings of a beautiful partnership if appropriately crafted for all parties involved.

Once you identify your public entity’s needs, it’s time to wrap some program parameters around what you hope to accomplish.

The first step in developing a robust community volunteer program is to identify public need. Work with folks within your organization to identify projects that have been sitting on the shelf for lack of funding, staffing or interest.

Identifying programs that volunteers can work on in your community — which are not protected by collective bargaining agreements or contractual agreement with other agencies — may mean that the only thing you have to purchase is the materials themselves.

More often than not, however, many community organizations are more than willing to donate their own supplies to accomplish a public program. That leaves you with the paperwork of accepting a donation instead of trying to find a shrinking budget line.

Some examples of community projects that offer potential are: Adopt a highway and by-way, water sampling, fish population studies, park plantings, spring cleanup, and trail upkeep.

Volunteer ADA sidewalk and intersection studies might also be on the top of your to-do list as you plan your upcoming budget. Check out Scouts looking for a signature project, or a school or church group looking to give back to the community.

Once you identify your public entity’s needs, it’s time to wrap some program parameters around what you hope to accomplish.

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Developing volunteer job descriptions with appropriate duties and responsibilities set the stage for ensuring your expectations and help outline the qualifications needed to accomplish your goals and those of the individual(s) or organization willing to assist you. Determining the physical and educational task criteria assist in promoting the success of your project’s outcome and your volunteers’ satisfaction with giving back to their community.

There may be special criteria needed for a particular volunteer project you are contemplating. Do you need to record a particular fish population, obtain daily water samples, identify a particular species of butterfly or bat? If special criteria are needed for any given task, consult a local educational institution to inquire whether or not they are interested in helping to set the criteria for your data collection.

Remember, each successful relationship with your community member in any volunteer program promotes good citizenship, a give back to the community, and moves along a project that has the capacity to positively benefit your financial bottom line.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Verizon’s risk manager David Cammarata loves when his team can make a real impact on the bottom line.
By: | May 2, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a financial analyst with the N.J. Casino Control Commission.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was told at a Christmas luncheon in 2003 that I was being promoted into a new job.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think the risk management community is getting a lot better at utilizing big data and analytics to manage risk. Significant improvements have been made, but there is still much more room for improvement.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think that the insurance and brokerage communities need to really start thinking about what this industry is going to look like in 10 years. They need to start addressing how they are going to remain relevant. I think that major disruptions to existing business models will occur and that these disruptions combined with innovation and technological advances may catch many of today’s industry leaders by surprise.

David Cammarata, assistant treasurer, risk management and insurance, Verizon Communications Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, any year.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the advent of cyber risk and cyber insurance. For several years it has been, and it continues to be, the main topic of discussion at industry meetings.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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I think the most scary scenarios include a nuclear, biological, chemical or radiological event, a widespread global health epidemic and/or a widespread state sponsored cyber shutdown.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We do almost all of our business through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

No. It’s a conflict.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

Optimistic because hopefully President Trump’s policies (lower taxes and less regulation) will be pro-business and good for the economy.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My dad, who passed away many years ago. He was very influential during the formative years of my career. He taught me how important integrity and reputation were to your brand and he had a very strong work ethic.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would have to say raising two awesome kids. My daughter is graduating from James Madison University this year as co-valedictorian. My son is finishing his sophomore year at Rutgers and has near perfect grades. But more importantly, both of my kids have turned out to be really good people.

R&I: How many emails do you get in a day?

A lot.

“I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.”

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“My Cousin Vinny.” That movie makes me laugh no matter how many times I watch it.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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My dad used to take me to a place called Chick & Nello’s. It was an Italian place that did not have a menu. They came to your table and told you the two or three items they were making that day. The food was out of this world.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Iced tea. The non-alcoholic kind.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

I can think of several places but for me it would be a tie between India and Italy. India just has such a different culture and way of life and Rome has breathtaking historical sites.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Well, one of the best thrill rides I’ve been on was Kingda Ka at Great Adventure. It feels risky but probably isn’t all that risky. I flew in a prop plane with my brother-in-law one time … that felt kind of risky. I have also parasailed, does that count? I think it definitely has to be driving on the N.J. Turnpike day in and day out.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

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What about the Fukushima 50? I don’t think I could have done what they did.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I don’t think they really know. My children see me as dad; others just see me as an executive with Verizon.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]