2222222222

Professional Liability

The Promise of Telemedicine

Ease of access and limitations on usage make this game-changing health care delivery method a popular choice for patients and a palatable risk for underwriters.
By: | May 2, 2017 • 6 min read

Talk to a hospital risk manager in the Midwest and they will say this: “We don’t have enough beds and providers to deliver adequate mental health services to wide swaths of the population.”

Now add in the access issues faced by rural residents to health care services in general. Or the fact that many providers do not take Medicaid patients. Or consider the risk of transporting a combative, fearful autistic child to the doctor’s office; or the fear of attack that a health care provider confronts when treating a potentially violent prison inmate.

Advertisement




Telemedicine — the ability for a medical provider to consult with a patient in a video conference — seems to present the cure for these societal ailments.

Its use is taking off like a rocket. The global telemedicine market is expected to be a $35 billion industry by 2020. Just two years ago, according to industry studies, there were approximately 20 million telemedicine consultations. That number is expected to increase to about 160 million — an increase of 700 percent — by 2020.

“We’ve been pretty heavily involved in the telemedicine arena for five years now and have seen exponential growth.” — Danny Talley, director of voluntary benefits, HUB

“We’ve been pretty heavily involved in the telemedicine arena for five years now and have seen exponential growth,” said Danny Talley, a Denver-based director of voluntary benefits with HUB.

Talley said ease of access and the fact that many minor afflictions, from colds to skin rashes, can be addressed in a teleconference are some of the keys to that growth.

The approach also lends itself well to mental health treatment, where talking through an issue with a licensed therapist in a video conference closely approximates a face-to-face visit.

At the very least, said Talley, a video conference with a caregiver can help to assess someone’s mental health and determine whether a face-to-face meeting, or some other intervention, might be necessary.

“With psychiatric care, the bulk of it has to do with talking to the patient, asking them questions,” said Njoki Wamiti, a vice president with IronHealth, the health care division of specialty underwriter Ironshore.

“In my opinion, I don’t think it makes that much of a difference. Whether it’s via a video or one-on-one, you are still having the same conversation,” she said.

Larry Hansard, regional managing director, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

“A full 50 percent of our clinical encounters have been in the realm of mental health services. This in part relates to the challenges of a serious shortage of mental health providers in the rural areas of our state,” said Dr. Karen Rheuban, a co-founder of the University of Virginia Center for Telehealth. Last year, the center was renamed the Karen S. Rheuban Center for Telehealth in honor of Rheuban’s work to expand health care opportunities through telemedicine.

“In most circumstances, a high quality video conference comports with the standard of care in mental health,” she added.

But as we assess potential liability in this field, let us not confuse a telephone conversation with a video conference conversation. When it comes to establishing a verifiable doctor/patient relationship, they are two very different things.

Rheuban said the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Drug Enforcement Administration have weighed in on the prescribing of Schedule II through Schedule V psychotropic drugs in the absence of a prior in-person visit.

“We are concerned about the risk of establishing a doctor-patient relationship with a telephone encounter alone that results in the prescribing of controlled substances,” she said.

The UVA program offers telehealth services across the health care continuum, from prenatal to palliative care, to acute care, consultations, follow-up visits and remote patient monitoring. It offers live video-based visits and store forward technologies.

Advertisement




As an example, ophtalmologists with the UVA program have trained community providers to obtain retinal images that are sent to them to screen patients with diabetes for retinopathy, the No. 1 cause of blindness in working adults.

Arthur J. Gallagher Regional Managing Director Larry Hansard, who suffers from frequent upper respiratory infections, recalled his own experience with telemedicine. “The physician looked at my throat via the real time video capability on my smartphone,” Hansard said. There was a prescription waiting for him at the drugstore in 10 minutes.

Compare that experience with having to wait days for an appointment, then taking off from work, driving a half hour or more, waiting to be called in to see the doctor and then driving back to the office.

“Why haven’t we been doing this forever?” Hansard asked.

Minimal Loss History

Telemedicine is growing quickly, so its loss history has yet to be well-established. As things stand, more than 70 percent of telemedicine interactions are for fairly common conditions.

“We are not seeing high-severity-type claims, most of the telemedicine usage we are currently seeing is for low-severity illnesses,” said Hansard.

The loss statistics that are available for telemedicine professional liability losses support Hansard’s statement.

“Licensure is the big risk for telemedicine providers, as they attempt to match a patient with a physician licensed in the state in which the patient is seeking care.” —  Larry Hansard, regional managing director, Arthur J. Gallagher & Co.

A 2015 report from the Physician Insurers Association of America revealed that of 94,228 medical professional liability claims in the PIAA’s Data Sharing Project (DSP) for the years 2004 through 2013, 196 claims were connected to telehealth.

The average indemnity loss for a telehealth claim was $303,691, compared to $328,815 for all MPL claims within the DSP.

“Licensure is the big risk for telemedicine providers, as they attempt to match a patient with a physician licensed in the state in which the patient is seeking care,” Hansard said. Many health care insurers will exclude coverage for a claim if it’s proven that the provider was not licensed in the same state where the patient received care.

Imagine a scenario where a patient is a passenger in a car that crosses the state line between Texas and New Mexico and is talking to a telehealth provider on the phone. If the provider is licensed in Texas, but not New Mexico, and there is an adverse event, the claim might not be covered.

“There are so many scenarios where people could cross state boundaries while on a telemedicine exchange,” Hansard said.

Hansard said most telemedicine providers are using smart technology so that they can track patients. But some aren’t.

“Some of the telemedicine providers are relying on older technology and they take the patient’s word for where they are located at the time of treatment,” Hansard said. “This could lead to problems if the patient misrepresents their location and the physician is not licensed in that particular venue.”

Advertisement




Hansard looks at the international use of telemedicine optimistically.

Imagine you are a supervisor on an oil rig in Venezuela. If you had the opportunity, would you rather consult with your doctor back in Texas via a teleportal, or have a face-to-face consultation with someone you don’t know as well.

“I understand that there are certain countries that will grant a U.S. doctor automatic privileges in those countries,” Hansard said. “If that’s true just imagine the possibilities for some of these telemedicine companies to set up shop there.” &

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession: Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Advertisement




I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

Advertisement




Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Advertisement




A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]