Risk Insider: Mark Watson

The Long Disruption

By: | October 23, 2017 • 3 min read
Mark Watson has served as President and CEO of Argo Group since 2000 and has been with the company since 1998, when it was Argonaut Group. He can be reached at [email protected]

Significant volumes of new capital now flow steadily from institutional and individual investors into the insurance industry. Some of this capital backs new entrants as they compete with legacy companies to disrupt the value chain and achieve greater returns than they might get elsewhere. Who will win?

When investors move their capital into insurance, the returns they expect are not high, just higher than the market average. Since investment returns have stayed near rock bottom for years, particularly in fixed income markets, any investment with expected returns of more than four or five percent looks good to the investors who supply the capital to new entrants.

This influx of funding with lower return hurdles has been disruptive in places and the disruption is irreversible, but change is nothing new to the insurance industry. Our industry has been rumbling for two decades. I first noticed individual investors in capital markets outside our industry moving into insurance back in the mid-nineties. Flush with cash and ambition, these entrepreneurs engineered a class of investments we now call catastrophe bonds. The capital flow into our industry has increased every year since. Twenty years later, it accounts for a significant amount of the industry’s catastrophic capacity.

Aggregate data does not yet beat deep domain expertise

What’s ahead? The steady stream of capital into insurance has produced over-capacity, which has in turn pushed margins down to historic lows as capitalists compete for the right to put their money to work. In some markets, the resulting margin pressures make it all but impossible for legacy businesses to generate a profit.

Will all-digital companies backed by billions of dollars of fresh investor capital shake up our industry even further? I don’t think so.

While they may be well funded, these new entrants are not having an easy time going it on their own, for three reasons. First, insurance is tough to underwrite without deep domain expertise. The aggregate data that disruptors in other industries tap into is not openly available in most corners of insurance, where much of the most prized data is proprietary.

The steady stream of capital into insurance has produced over-capacity, which has in turn pushed margins down to historic lows as capitalists compete for the right to put their money to work.

Even with artificial intelligence promising quantum leaps in risk modeling, the knowledge of what to look for and base decisions on resides within the corners of the industry where the true risk experts are. Second, the cost of acquiring customers directly can be in the hundreds of million of dollars. And third, ours is a fiercely regulated industry with mandatory requirements varying wildly from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. The only way a new entrant backed by even limitless capital could navigate that environment would be to partner with a company that knows the ropes.

The future belongs to the customer

Where is the greatest opportunity to be found during this shift? I believe judicious use of technology combined with existing insurance expertise is the path to continued growth. That means the future belongs to neither the legacy companies nor the start-ups with their fresh capital alone.

It belongs to partnerships between these two groups, marrying deep and broad insurance knowledge with digital expertise to bring capital closer to the risk, reduce the complexity of offerings, and deliver greater value to customers. As ever, the successful players will be those that meet customers’ needs best.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2018 Risk All Stars

Stop Mitigating Risk. Start Conquering It Like These 2018 Risk All Stars

The concept of risk mastery and ownership, as displayed by the 2018 Risk All Stars, includes not simply seeking to control outcomes but taking full responsibility for them.
By: | September 14, 2018 • 3 min read

People talk a lot about how risk managers can get a seat at the table. The discussion implies that the risk manager is an outsider, striving to get the ear or the attention of an insider, the CEO or CFO.

Advertisement




But there are risk managers who go about things in a different way. And the 2018 Risk All Stars are prime examples of that.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Goodyear’s Craig Melnick had only been with the global tire maker a few months when Hurricane Harvey dumped a record amount of rainfall on Houston.

Brilliant communication between Melnick and his new teammates gave him timely and valuable updates on the condition of manufacturing locations. Melnick remained in Akron, mastering the situation by moving inventory out of the storm’s path and making sure remediation crews were lined up ahead of time to give Goodyear its best leg up once the storm passed and the flood waters receded.

Goodyear’s resiliency in the face of the storm gave it credibility when it went to the insurance markets later that year for renewals. And here is where we hear a key phrase, produced by Kevin Garvey, one of Goodyear’s brokers at Aon.

“The markets always appreciate a risk manager who demonstrates ownership,” Garvey said, in what may be something of an understatement.

These risk managers put in gear their passion, creativity and perseverance to become masters of a situation, pushing aside any notion that they are anything other than key players.

Dianne Howard, a 2018 Risk All Star and the director of benefits and risk management for the Palm Beach County School District, achieved ownership of $50 million in property storm exposures for the district.

With FEMA saying it wouldn’t pay again for district storm losses it had already paid for, Howard went to the London markets and was successful in getting coverage. She also hammered out a deal in London that would partially reimburse the district if it suffered a mass shooting and needed to demolish a building, like what happened at Sandy Hook in Connecticut.

2018 Risk All Star Jim Cunningham was well-versed enough to know what traditional risk management theories would say when hospitality workers were suffering too many kitchen cuts. “Put a cut-prevention plan in place,” is the traditional wisdom.

But Cunningham, the vice president of risk management for the gaming company Pinnacle Entertainment, wasn’t satisfied with what looked to him like a Band-Aid approach.

Advertisement




Instead, he used predictive analytics, depending on his own team to assemble company-specific data, to determine which safety measures should be used company wide. The result? Claims frequency at the company dropped 60 percent in the first year of his program.

Alumine Bellone, a 2018 Risk All Star and the vice president of risk management for Ardent Health Services, faced an overwhelming task: Create a uniform risk management program when her hospital group grew from 14 hospitals in three states to 31 hospitals in seven.

Bellone owned the situation by visiting each facility right before the acquisition and again right after, to make sure each caregiving population was ready to integrate into a standardized risk management system.

After consolidating insurance policies, Bellone achieved $893,000 in synergies.

In each of these cases, and in more on the following pages, we see examples of risk managers who weren’t just knocking on the door; they were owning the room. &

____________________

Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, clarity of vision and passion.

See the complete list of 2018 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]