Column: Workers' Comp

The Case for Exoskeletons

By: | October 15, 2016 • 2 min read
Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

I hope more workers’ compensation insurers seriously evaluate paying for exoskeletons that allow patients with certain spinal cord injuries to rise from their wheelchairs and walk.

Exoskeletons are assistive devices often described as “wearable robots” or “Segways with legs.” Since 2014, the Food and Drug Administration has approved two models for personal use, including one earlier this year.

Some workers’ comp insurers have already approved a few claims for the motorized devices and the cost of training. Other underwriters have declined to fund them.

The battery-powered devices cost at least $80,000 plus additional training. Safety questions remain and some doctors who agree on the medical benefits they provide are still wary of certifying them as “medically necessary.”

But the products are among technological advancements in patient care — like increasingly sophisticated prosthesis — that payers should learn about to adequately weigh the exoskeleton’s price tag against potential medical care and medication expense reductions resulting from their benefits.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye. Well-being impacts claims expense.” – Clare Hartigan, physical therapist, exoskeleton clinical trail leader at Shepherd Center

Attendees at the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo in New Orleans can watch an injured worker’s exoskeleton demonstration during a session titled “The Bionic Claimant: Emerging Medical Technology’s Impact on Care and Cost.”

Clare Hartigan, a physical therapist who will speak during the session, has led clinical trials on exoskeletons at the Shepherd Center, a rehab hospital in Atlanta. She will be joined by Mark Sidney, VP of claims at Midwest Employers Casualty Co.

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Exoskeletons’ well-documented medical benefits for spinal injury patients include improved bowel and bladder function, weight loss and better glucose test results, Hartigan said.

“Psychological benefits also result from standing, walking and looking others eye to eye,” Hartigan said. “Well-being impacts claims expense.”

Apart from clinical uses and workers’ comp, other exoskeleton applications are emerging. The military is testing robotic-like suits that could help soldiers carry more weight and reach the battleground less fatigued.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health expects rapid growth in industrial wearable exoskeleton suits that can help workers lift greater loads or hold up heavier tools for longer periods.

But it would also be great to see more workers who have lost their mobility in workplace accidents benefit from the health and quality-of-life improvements exoskeletons offer. Perhaps that will come as more insurers learn about exoskeletons and begin evaluating their unit costs against their impact on medical expenses.

We can also hope for decreases in exoskeletons’ cost as commonly occurs with most technology products. But the companies offering them will need to recoup their R&D expenses. &

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 Risk All Stars

Immeasurable Value

The 2017 Risk All Stars strengthened their organizations by taking ownership of improved risk management processes and not quitting until they were in place.
By: | September 12, 2017 • 3 min read

Being the only person to hold a particular opinion or point of view within an organization cannot be easy. Do the following sound like familiar stories? Can you picture yourself or one of your risk management colleagues as the hero or heroine? Or better yet, as a Risk & Insurance® Risk All Star?

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One risk manager took a job with a company that was being spun off, and the risk management program, which was built for a much larger company, was not a good fit for the spun-off company.
Rather than sink into inertia, this risk manager took the bull by the horns and began an aggressive company intranet campaign to instill better safety and other risk management practices throughout the organization.

The risk manager, 2017 Risk All Star Michelle Bennett of Cable One, also changed some long-standing brokerage relationships that weren’t a good fit for the risk management and insurance program. In her first year on the job she produced premium savings and in her second year is in the process of introducing ERM company-wide.

Or perhaps this one rings a bell. The news is trickling out that a company is poised to dramatically expand, increasing the workforce three- or four-fold. Having this knowledge with certainty would be a great benefit to a risk manager, who could begin girding safety, workers’ comp and related programs accordingly. But things sometimes don’t work that way, do they? Sometimes the risk manager is one of the last people to know.

The Risk All Star Award recognizes at its core, creativity, perseverance and passion. The 13 winners of this year’s award all displayed those traits in abundance.

In the case of 2017 Risk All Star winner Steve Richards of the Coca-Cola Bottling Company, the news of an expansion spurred him to action. He completely overhauled the company’s workers’ compensation program and streamlined its claim management system. The results, even with a much higher headcount, were reduced legal costs, better return-to-work experiences for injured workers and a host of other improvements and savings.

The Risk All Star Award recognizes at its core, creativity, perseverance and passion. The 13 winners of this year’s award all displayed those traits in abundance. Sometimes it took years for a particular risk solution, as promoted by a risk manager, to find acceptance.

In other cases a risk manager got so excited about a solution, they never even considered getting turned down. They just kept pushing until they carried the day.

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Butler University’s Zach Finn became obsessive about what he felt was a lackluster effort on the part of the insurance industry to bring in new talent. The former risk manager for the J.M. Smucker Co. settled on the creation of a student-run captive to give his risk management students the experience they would need to get hired right out of college.

The result was a better risk management program for the university’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and immediate traction in the job market for Finn’s students.

A few of our Risk All Stars told us that the results they are achieving were decades in the making. Only by year-in, year-out dedication to gaining transparency about her co-op’s risks and learning more and more about her various insurance carriers, did Growmark Inc.’s Faith Cring create a stalwart risk management and insurance program that is the envy of the agricultural sector. Now she’s been with some of her insurance carriers more than 20 years — some more than 30 years.

Having the right idea and not having a home for it can be a lonely, frustrating experience. Having the creativity, the passion and perhaps, most importantly, the perseverance to see it through and get great results makes you a Risk All Star. &

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Risk All Stars stand out from their peers by overcoming challenges through exceptional problem solving, creativity, perseverance and passion.

See the complete list of 2017 Risk All Stars.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]