Teddy Awards

Teddy Awards 2016: Share Your Success

Apply now for the 2016 Theodore Roosevelt Workers' Compensation and Disability Management Awards.
By: | March 17, 2016 • 3 min read

Last November in Las Vegas, the 2015 Teddy Award winners faced a packed session at National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo, with attendees eager to learn more about their successful programs.The session was enthusiastically received.

Afterward, attendees were overheard saying to colleagues, “We should start doing that … let’s discuss it when we get back to the office … .” Clearly, conference organizers were spot-on when naming that session “Steal These Ideas!”

Does your company have ideas worth stealing too? Are you proud of what you have been accomplishing with your workers’ compensation and injury prevention programs? We’d like to learn more about them.

The application is now available online for the 2016 Theodore Roosevelt Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Awards, aka The Teddys.

The awards are open to both for-profit and nonprofit employers, as well as governmental entities. And while there are quite a few large employers among our list of past winners, small and mid-size entities are encouraged to apply.

Advertisement




Our judges look for quality rather than quantity, and plenty of past winners have proven that it’s possible to accomplish great things even with limited resources.

Some food for thought as you prepare your application. We are looking for well-rounded programs that take a holistic approach to safety, workers’ comp and disability management. Teddy Award winning companies, no matter their size or industry, have several core characteristics in common.

They do everything possible to protect their most valuable asset: their people. They strive daily to reduce workplace risks and prevent injuries from happening.

When injuries do happen, winning companies waste no time securing expert care for their workers. They also have systems and practices to ensure that they’re getting the best possible outcomes for their medical spend.

Our judges look for quality rather than quantity, and plenty of past winners have proven that it’s possible to accomplish great things even with limited resources.

Teddy winners frequently amaze us with their 110 percent commitment to getting all injured employees back to work, using imaginative strategies that turn the old model of return-to-work on its head.

They also track and measure everything — continuously and aggressively looking for opportunities to improve outcomes while eliminating wasted expense.

Along the way, many of them also develop effective strategies that help manage challenges such as union negotiations, legacy claims, litigation and fraud.

Not least of all, Teddy winners get results. We look at the last five years’ worth of performance data to gauge whether the company’s programs really help achieve the intended goals.

Judges factor in every element potentially affecting that performance, including the intensity of the challenges faced, as well as the age of the program.

Teddy winners go above and beyond best practices, and they have a firm grasp of the big picture. They leverage the talent of internal teams as well as vendor partners to build programs that enable them to drive year-over-year improvement for the long-term.

For inspiration, read about last year’s Teddy Award winners. It could be your organization whose praises we’re singing this year.

The 2016 Teddy Award winners will be profiled in the November 2016 issue of Risk & Insurance®, and will be recognized at the National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo in New Orleans, held Nov. 30 – Dec. 2, 2016.

For questions about the awards or the application process, please contact Michelle Kerr at [email protected] or 215-784-0910, ext. 6216.

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Pinnacle Entertainment’s VP of enterprise risk management says he’s inspired by Disney’s approach to risk management.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Bus boy at a fine dining restaurant.

R&I: How did you come to work in this industry?

I sent a résumé to Harrah’s Entertainment on a whim. It took over 30 hours of interviewing to get that job, but it was well worth it.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Advertisement




The Chinese citizen (never positively identified) who stood in front of a column of tanks in Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. That kind of courage is undeniable, and that image is unforgettable. I hope we can all be that passionate about something at least once in our lives.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Cyber risk, but more narrowly, cyber-extortion. I think state sponsored bad actors are getting more and more sophisticated, and the risk is that they find a way to control entire systems.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Training and breaking horses. When I was in high school, I worked on a lot of farms. I did everything from building fences to putting up hay. It was during this time that I found I had a knack for horses. They would tolerate me getting real close, so it was natural I started working more and more with them.

Eventually, I was putting a saddle on a few and before I knew it I was in that saddle riding a horse that had never been ridden before.

I admit I had some nervous moments, but I was never thrown off. It taught me that developing genuine trust early is very important and is needed by all involved. Nothing of any real value happens without it.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Advertisement




Setting very aggressive goals and then meeting and exceeding those goals with a team. Sharing team victories is the ultimate reward.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Disney World. The sheer size of the place is awe inspiring. And everything works like a finely tuned clock.

There is a reason that hospitality companies send their people there to be trained on guest service. Disney World does it better than anyone else.

As a hospitality executive, I always learn something new whenever I am there.

James Cunningham, vice president, enterprise risk management, Pinnacle Entertainment, Inc.

The risks that Disney World faces are very similar to mine — on a much larger scale. They are complex and across the board. From liability for the millions of people they host as their guests each year, to the physical location of the park, to their vendor partnerships; their approach to risk management has been and continues to be innovative and a model that I learn from and I think there are lessons there for everybody.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

We are doing a much better job of getting involved in a meaningful way in our daily operations and demonstrating genuine value to our organizations.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Educating and promoting the career with young people.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Being able to tell the Pinnacle story. It’s a great one and it wasn’t being told. I believe that the insurance markets now understand who we are and what we stand for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Advertisement




John Matthews, who is now retired, formerly with Aon and Caesar’s Palace. John is an exceptional leader who demonstrated the value of putting a top-shelf team together and then letting them do their best work. I model my management style after him.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

I read mostly biographies and autobiographies. I like to read how successful people became successful by overcoming their own obstacles. Jay Leno, Jack Welch, Bill Harrah, etc. I also enjoyed the book and movie “Money Ball.”

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Ice water when it’s hot, coffee when it’s cold, and an adult beverage when it’s called for.

R&I: What does your family think you do?

In my family, I’m the “Safety Geek.”

R&I:  What’s your favorite restaurant?

Vegas is a world-class restaurant town. No matter what you are hungry for, you can find it here. I have a few favorites that are my “go-to’s,” depending on the mood and who I am with.

If you’re in town, you should try to have at least one meal off the strip. For that, I would suggest you get reservations (you’ll need them) at Herbs and Rye. It’s a great little restaurant that is always lively. The food is tremendous, and the service is always on point. They make hand-crafted cocktails that are amazing.

My favorite Mexican restaurant is Lindo Michoacan. There are three in town, and I prefer the one in Henderson as it has the best view of the valley. For seafood, you can never go wrong with Joe’s in Caesar’s Palace.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]