Risk Insider: Nir Kossovsky

Speaking Volumes When D&O Defenses are Muted

By: | May 22, 2017 • 4 min read
Nir Kossovsky is the Chief Executive Officer of Steel City Re. He has been developing solutions for measuring, managing, monetizing, and transferring risks to intangible assets since 1997. He is also a published author, and can be reached at [email protected]

The Wall Street Journal headline was arresting: “Activist Investors Have a New Bloodlust: CEOs.”

The next day in the Financial Times, activist investor Jeff Ubben criticized the methods of activist firm, Elliott Management, noting that when companies are under attack, “ … you don’t ever hear the management or board side because they’re the defense, and the defense doesn’t talk.”

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To defend, a CEO could talk about his value-protecting governance, risk and compliance (GRC) investment leadership and hopefully mitigate an activist-initiated reputation crisis.

A prudent CEO would engage a credible third party to speak to the court of public opinion proactively on his and the board’s behalf, because as Ubben further noted, “ … when you [the CEO] do strike back, you’re fired.”

There is a range of alternative defensive strategies — none of which are particularly promising. The status quo, silence, is a path to disaster today.

In an age of weaponized social media, generalized anger and boards increasingly intimidated by activists, CEOs are in the crosshairs like never before.

“CEOs face an ‘unforgiving’ business environment, fraught with social, political and technological upheavals,” Marco Amitrano, head of consulting at PwC UK, recently told the Financial Times.

Silence aside, a CEO’s other historical defenses — chairing the board, board-accorded courtesies, the old-boys network, and D&O liability insurance — are no better than the Maginot line in arresting an activist blitzkrieg.

Fewer CEOs are chairing boards. Equilar, a data analytics company, reports that an increasing number of firms are appointing an independent director to run their boards. Among S&P 500 companies, 35.1 percent now have a non-executive chairman, up from 27.7 percent in 2012.

The boards are also less courteous to the CEOs. Late last year, State Street Global Advisors railed against boards that, in the Advisors’ opinion, were buckling too quickly to activist demands materially adverse to the interest of the CEO. “Say on Pay,” threats of clawbacks, shorter tenures and long-term incentives are one-way messages adding up to “don’t screw up — deal with it.”

There is a range of alternative defensive strategies — none of which are particularly promising. The status quo, silence, is a path to disaster today.

Consider the cognitive dissonance when the head of BP’s remuneration committee, Ann Dowling, said in a letter to investors “As a result — in a year of good performance and progress – (CEO) Bob Dudley’s total single figure for 2016 has been reduced by some 40 percent compared to last year.”

For male CEOs, even the protections afforded by the aptly disparaged old boys network are slipping. Being “male, pale, and stale” is today a liability in the eyes of proxy advisory groups.

According to the consultancy firm Challenger, Gray & Christmas, of 1,043 CEOs who were replaced in 2016, 18.5 percent were replaced by women. In 2010, just 12.3 percent of 943 replacements were women.

Moreover, in 2013, nearly two males replaced a female CEO for every female that replaced a male CEO. The ratio flipped in 2014, and by 2016 1.3 females had replaced a male CEO for every male that replaced a female CEO.

Not that being a woman afforded any intrinsic protections, either. The New York Times in 2015 left unanswered the question of whether activist investors — all of them men — see women as softer targets.

Prompting the question was the observation that while only 23 women lead companies in the Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index, at least a quarter of them had fallen into the crosshairs of activist investors.

And while D&O liability insurance was once upon a time a badge of good governance, issued only to highly qualified companies and their management, it is today commoditized and holds no standing in the court of public opinion.

And thus, both great and the average CEOs are turning over in greater numbers. In 2016, according to the executive services firm SpencerStuart, 58 of the S&P 500’s CEOs transitioned. That the highest number since 2006, a 13 percent increase over 2015, and a 57 percent increase over the nadir in 2012. The average age in 2016 was 60, which is 2 years younger than the average age in 2015.

There are two ways to give great CEOs a voice and a means to defend themselves against activists. The first is by brilliantly navigating a firm through a great reputational crisis, such as Johnson & Johnson’s Tylenol II reprise or Rolls-Royce’s Trent 9000 engine failure. Upon appreciation by the market of their excellence in leadership, both firms went on to greatly outperform their peers.

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The other strategy is an endorsement from a credible third party, such as the life-saving blessing Warren Buffet gave the CEO and select board members at Wells Fargo.

For CEOs who are not friends-of-Warren, it is better to use a growing number of creative post-PR signaling strategies — like D&O insurance once was — to communicate loudly in unambiguous financial terms that “good governance is practiced here.”

These third-party warranties and endorsements, which do include reputation insurance products, act like security alarm signs on the front lawn — they deter and blunt attacks and protect companies and individuals in leadership if those attacks do occur.

That third party signal is something that really great CEOs need to broadcast on their behalf … when all others fall silent.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]