Risk Insider: Kevin Kalinich

Risky Things

By: | August 27, 2015 • 2 min read
Kevin Kalinich is the global cyber risk practice leader for Aon Risk Solutions, focusing on identifying exposures and developing insurance solutions. He can be reached at [email protected]

Some of us are old enough to remember when our stand-alone computers first became networked with other computers. Who over 40 years old doesn’t recall sending and receiving that first email?

That profound technological development – networked computing – brought enormous advantages but also set the stage for security concerns, like viruses and malware, which can be an Achilles heel of computer technology.

With the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT), we find that it is more than just our computers that are connected. Our homes, possessions and even our physical bodies are becoming connected.

Many IoT products can actually reduce exposures.

Arrays of smart, sensor-equipped, connected devices that collect and digitize a wide variety of data are already being used, with exponentially more in development.

Literally tens of billions of “things” containing sensors – cars, homes, medical devices – will be connected in the next several years. A range of twenty to 50 billion of these “things” are estimated to be installed by 2020, with a vast amount more to follow.

An example is car manufacturers’ strategies to sell “tires as a service.” The car manufacturers use embedded technology to detect tire wear and under-inflation, which improves service and increases safety.

The IoT phenomenon is unfolding faster than developers can address the accompanying security vulnerabilities and risk management concerns. We are living in a new world in which our “things” can tattle on us, compromise our privacy or even harm us.

While telematics in vehicles or home appliances may seem helpful when we need roadside assistance or to diagnose maintenance issues, they can also report our speed or our diet, which to some may seem invasive.

Drones, hidden cameras and driverless cars once seemed like fantasy objects in a futuristic world, but suddenly that future is here, and it is unclear how liability would be assigned when one of these “things” misbehaves or is used to harm another.

On the contrary, not all IoT innovations are necessarily harmful. Many IoT products can actually reduce exposures. Home automation startups being incubated by Microsoft Ventures carry a number of safety benefits, such as turning off your stove or protecting your home from water damage.

IBM just announced a $3 billion investment in IoT and is launching a multitude of services that will help make us safer, such as alerting car insurance policyholders of storms to help prevent damage. So it’s important to remember that IoT exposures are not necessarily negative, just different.

With the increased use of internet-connected devices, however, new types of exposures have arisen to increase the possibility of certain damages. This creates an enterprise risk management challenge as businesses seek to harness the exciting potential of this evolving technology while managing the related cyber threats.

The data gathered by IoT is often quite vulnerable. According to a study by HP, it’s estimated that 70 percent of the most commonly used devices contain serious vulnerabilities. Potential concerns include a dangerous hacker disabling a life-sustaining medical device, the brakes in an automobile, or aviation systems from Wi-Fi or power grids.

As it has repeatedly done throughout history, our ability to create new technology is opening up worlds of opportunity. It’s also creating new types of risk.

Plaintiffs’ attorneys will look to those involved in the design, production, delivery and servicing of the IoT device that allegedly causes economic loss, bodily injury or tangible property damage.

While it is impossible to predict the exact impact of the IoT on the insurance industry, this much is clear: future IoT evolution will force the insurance industry to better clarify where coverage starts and stops under each type of policy.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]