RIMS 2016

A Potentially Explosive Reputational Risk

With guns a hot-button emotional issue, employers face tough choices for managing related reputational exposures.
By: | April 7, 2016 • 2 min read

With more Americans passionate about carrying guns in public and more laws allowing it, businesses must assess their risk tolerance and prepare.

Uniform strategies that mitigate the growing risk of gun-related losses for most entities, however, have yet to emerge, leaving employers to define the best plan of action for their unique circumstances and their stance on guns on their premises.

The risks that restaurants, universities and most other entities face include, workers’ compensation losses, general liability exposures and operational challenges, should a shooting force an extended closure.

“”The biggest risk, actually, is reputational,” said Michael P. Lowry, an attorney at Thorndal, Armstrong, Delk, Balkenbush & Eisinger. “So if you can avoid that by taking some preventative measures you are ahead of the game. You are helping to contribute to the company’s bottom line.”

While the growing risk of a mass shooting incident will cause reputational harm, taking a stance on whether to ban guns or welcome customers and employees who pack them also generates reputational backlash from ardent proponents on both sides of the issue, the speakers said.

About five years ago Texas de Brazil posted their policy online stating that the restaurant company was fine with allowing concealed weapons or the open carrying of firearms in states where laws allow those practices.

“We were vilified within the first three days,” said Danielle Goodgion, director of human resources for the Brazilian-style steakhouse and churrascaria with locations across the United States.

“We pulled it off the website. It was not worth the drama.”

Conversely, companies that seek to mitigate the risk of violence by banning guns on their premises face social media attacks from interest groups opposing such policies “and now your brand is being drug through the mud,” Lowry said.

While a simple, uniform policy for mitigating the reputational exposures associated with firearms does not exist, risk managers should identify their risks and develop a plan that best protects their employees, customers and operations, the speakers said.

Each plan, however, comes with its own potential consequences requiring assessment.

Welcoming guns on premises, for instance, expose companies to liability should a weapon accidentally discharge. Posting signs banning guns, on the other hand, could expose the companies to claims from injured parties that the companies were responsible for their safety, Lowry said.

Whatever policies employers adopt, it is important they maintain mechanisms for enforcing those policies.

Employees, for instance, need to know what is expected of them and their responsibility for themselves and customers should a situation arise requiring action.

Goodgion said the company trains employees to respond to gun-violence threats or active shooter situations.

That training works in conjunction with other guidance such as anti-bullying training and exercises for identifying potential workplace dangers, for example, to provide opportunities for teaching how to treat others with dignity and respect and how to respond should violence occur, she said.

“All of that integrates,” Goodgion said. “It’s an evolution. So adding an active shooter response is just one more piece. For me, it was just adding another segment to the training.”

Roberto Ceniceros is senior editor at Risk & Insurance® and chair of the National Workers' Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo. He can be reached at [email protected] Read more of his columns and features.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]