2017 Power Broker

Real Estate

A Key Innovator

Robert Colburn
ColburnColburn, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.

One of Robert Colburn’s clients faced challenges with the historic renovation of some of its buildings and the purchase of vacant distressed properties. Colburn was able to create and negotiate a program with the carriers to successfully mitigate the risks and costs across the entire portfolio.

Another developer, owner and property manager just recapitalized a high-rise office property with extensive catastrophe exposure and a high total insurable value. The lender imposed a new set of loan and insurance terms including high limits for flood and wind coverage. But because capacity wasn’t readily available in the traditional marketplace, Colburn had to go directly to the carrier’s top management to obtain the necessary limits to meet the lender’s requirements.


“Even while on a family vacation in a different time zone, Robert accommodated several conference calls, which is a clear example of dedication,” said his client, William Gilbert, vice president and corporate controller at REDICO Management.

For another client, he leveraged his relationship with a carrier to create a stand-alone property program with comparable terms to its historic master global property program run by its joint venture partner. He was able to negotiate significant savings on the property rate and lower the attachment point in line with the client’s risk tolerance.

“Once Robert has the ball on something, I don’t need to worry about whether it gets done — I know it will,” said his client.

Man of Many Talents

Michael Feinberg
Executive Vice President
Alliant Insurance Services Inc., Boston

When one of Michael Feinberg’s clients was left without a competitive policy for its multi-building phased development project, Feinberg was quick to act.

Designing an $80 million-limit residential builder’s risk coverage in a secondary market policy form, he was able to achieve best-in-class coverage terms as well as a lower price and more favorable security terms than quoted by the incumbent.

Another client suffered fire damage to a $500,000 HVAC chiller at one of its properties in South Carolina, but the insurers were only willing to replace the control board with a retrofit model. When the client insisted that a new chiller was the only way to ensure proper HVAC operation, Feinberg spent more than six months advocating to 11 insurers and received a $530,000 payment to replace the chiller.


In another case, he redesigned a large residential real estate client’s property insurance placement after the incumbent declined to renew after substantial flood losses.

Feinberg successfully procured the same coverage at a lower rate, including a $20 million flood aggregate with a $10 million aggregate in high hazard to meet the lender’s requirements.

“Mike has a personal feeling for every loss — he treats it like it’s his own,” said his client Edward J. Easton, owner of the Easton Group. “He’s extremely professional and highly responsive to everything that we do to meet our insurance needs.”

A Force of Nature

Alexandra Glickman
Managing Director
Arthur J. Gallagher, Glendale, Calif.

Starting a multimillion dollar five-star destination resort from scratch is never easy. Risks to consider include potential business interruption due to offshore pollution and contingent business interruption for shipments of one-of-a-kind materials.

That’s not to mention the decision to go with owner controlled or contractor controlled insurance programs.
That was the challenge facing Alexandra Glickman when her client Caruso Affiliated announced a new California coast development.

Having gone out to about 30 markets, she came up with a comprehensive and highly manuscripted insurance and risk-financing program that satisfied all parties’ needs.

She also put together a liability and property insurance program for a real estate investment trust that runs an incubator for startups in its properties across the country.


“To be able to structure a deal that protected not only our interests and the interests of the landlord, but also to provide the startups with a simple license solution was a big win for us, both in terms of coverage and cost,” said her client.

“Alexandra is a force of nature — she’s probably one of the best brokers on the West Coast, if not in the country.”

Another client said: “Alexandra sets the tone immediately in familiarizing her clients with delivery expectations, given her real estate knowledge and stellar relationships with the insurance markets and professional networks.”

‘He’s That Good’

Mike Gong, CIC, CAWC
Area Vice President
Arthur J. Gallagher, Fresno, Calif

Mike Gong discovered that a self-storage client was paying far more than necessary for flood insurance. Working closely with the client and a risk management company specializing in flood risk, Gong proved that the majority of the client’s buildings weren’t in a flood zone, and convinced the client’s lender to amend its insurance requirement, saving the client 80 percent on its flood insurance premiums.

“Mike understands how our business works and is quick to resolve issues that arise from time to time,” said Charlie Fritts, COO for Storage Investment Management. “Because of his extensive experience he knows many of the underwriters whom he will contact personally when he feels he can make a good argument for a lower rate.”


He has also come up with a solution for self-storage clients whose properties don’t conform to local zoning laws, which enables them to rebuild their real estate asset and indemnifies against losses.

“Mike’s key strengths are his knowledge and customer service,” said another client, Terry Aston, vice president at Carlo Development Co.

“I just send something to him and I never even have to think about it again — he’s that good.”
Another client said: “I have dealt with many brokers and agents during my time but Mike is up there with the best.”

Taking It to the Next Level

Tony Lorber
Senior Vice President
EPIC, San Francisco

When one of Tony Lorber’s clients told him it wanted to purchase earthquake insurance on its large portfolio of properties, it was time to put his thinking cap on.

Leveraging the use of earthquake models and analytics as well as his knowledge of the market, he quickly identified specific criteria where the client didn’t need to buy cover on all of its properties, on a program the client admits is difficult to insure.

This allowed the client to maximize the amount of coverage it could purchase at the best value. Last year, his client asked him to develop a new methodology that would significantly increase the number of properties included without a rise in premium.
He was able to achieve this by looking at every building on a case-by-case basis and then utilized his contacts to find the best carriers.

In another case, he recommended that his client could take greater control of its general liability losses if it had a larger retention, while also providing cost savings.


He took about six months to finally convince the carrier that this approach made sense for his client and how it could implement this practice going forward.

“Tony is probably the most experienced and knowledgeable broker that I have ever worked with,” said Shanna Berrien, director of risk and insurance at CWS Capital Partners.

Another client said: “Tony just takes broking to a new level with his unique approach, hard work and dedication, meaning that he always exceeds our expectations.”

The One to Rely on for Complex Projects

Fred Zutel, CIC
Senior Vice President
Willis Towers Watson, Miami

When real estate development company BH3 Management decided to build a $200 million-plus ultra-luxury condominium project on Miami’s last private island, they turned to Fred Zutel.

He managed to secure an extremely competitive program, reducing the projected premium spend by more than $1.5 million, while leveraging analytics to negotiate insurance requirements with the lender and optimizing the builder’s risk program.

For another developer working on a condo project of similar size, he structured a unique surety program that saved millions and significantly reduced overall exposure.
Rocco Carlucci, director of risk management at Property Markets Group, for whom Zutel designed a new program, said: “Over the course of the 11 months that we worked together, Fred has brought to light issues that previously existed that we were then able to address at renewal, as well as to make sure that we are adhering to industry best practice.

“Fred has gone out of his way time and time again to make sure I understand what we’re discussing and why it’s important. He’s taken the time to make me feel comfortable with the options presented and in determining what solution works best.”


Another developer client said: “Fred has always provided exceptional customer service.

“He is extremely responsive and has a quick turnaround. He always delivers when or before he says he will.”


Nancy Ayers
Senior Vice President
Alliant/Mesirow Insurance Services, Chicago

William Bray
Vice President
Wells Fargo, Houston

Robert Mazzaro
Managing Director
Marsh, New York

Caroline Parrish
Senior Property Broker
Aon, Miami

Nicholas Rawden
Vice President
Marsh, New York

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Focus: Cyber

Expanding Cyber BI

Cyber business interruption insurance is a thriving market, but growth carries the threat of a mega-loss. 
By: | March 5, 2018 • 7 min read

Lingering hopes that large-scale cyber attack might be a once-in-a-lifetime event were dashed last year. The four-day WannaCry ransomware strike in May across 150 countries targeted more than 300,000 computers running Microsoft Windows. A month later, NotPetya hit multinationals ranging from Danish shipping firm Maersk to pharmaceutical giant Merck.


Maersk’s chairman, Jim Hagemann Snabe, revealed at this year’s Davos summit that NotPetya shut down most of the group’s network. While it was replacing 45,000 PCs and 4,000 servers, freight transactions had to be completed manually. The combined cost of business interruption and rebuilding the system was up to $300 million.

Merck’s CFO Robert Davis told investors that its NotPetya bill included $135 million in lost sales plus $175 million in additional costs. Fellow victims FedEx and French construction group Saint Gobain reported similar financial hits from lost business and clean-up costs.

The fast-expanding world of cryptocurrencies is also increasingly targeted. Echoes of the 2014 hack that triggered the collapse of Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox emerged this January when Japanese cryptocurrency exchange Coincheck pledged to repay customers $500 million stolen by hackers in a cyber heist.

The size and scope of last summer’s attacks accelerated discussions on both sides of the Atlantic, between risk managers and brokers seeking more comprehensive cyber business interruption insurance products.

It also recently persuaded Pool Re, the UK’s terrorism reinsurance pool set up 25 years ago after bomb attacks in London’s financial quarter, to announce that from April its cover will extend to include material damage and direct BI resulting from acts of terrorism using a cyber trigger.

“The threat from a cyber attack is evident, and businesses have become increasingly concerned about the extensive repercussions these types of attacks could have on them,” said Pool Re’s chief, Julian Enoizi. “This was a clear gap in our coverage which left businesses potentially exposed.”

Shifting Focus

Development of cyber BI insurance to date reveals something of a transatlantic divide, said Hans Allnutt, head of cyber and data risk at international law firm DAC Beachcroft. The first U.S. mainstream cyber insurance products were a response to California’s data security and breach notification legislation in 2003.

Jimaan Sané, technology underwriter, Beazley

Of more recent vintage, Europe’s first cyber policies’ wordings initially reflected U.S. wordings, with the focus on data breaches. “So underwriters had to innovate and push hard on other areas of cyber cover, particularly BI and cyber crimes such as ransomware demands and distributed denial of service attacks,” said Allnut.

“Europe now has regulation coming up this May in the form of the General Data Protection Regulation across the EU, so the focus has essentially come full circle.”

Cyber insurance policies also provide a degree of cover for BI resulting from one of three main triggers, said Jimaan Sané, technology underwriter for specialist insurer Beazley. “First is the malicious-type trigger, where the system goes down or an outage results directly from a hack.

“Second is any incident involving negligence — the so-called ‘fat finger’ — where human or operational error causes a loss or there has been failure to upgrade or maintain the system. Third is any broader unplanned outage that hits either the company or anyone on which it relies, such as a service provider.”

The importance of cyber BI covering negligent acts in addition to phishing and social engineering attacks was underlined by last May’s IT meltdown suffered by airline BA.

This was triggered by a technician who switched off and then reconnected the power supply to BA’s data center, physically damaging servers and distribution panels.

Compensating delayed passengers cost the company around $80 million, although the bill fell short of the $461 million operational error loss suffered by Knight Capital in 2012, which pushed it close to bankruptcy and decimated its share price.

Mistaken Assumption

Awareness of potentially huge BI losses resulting from cyber attack was heightened by well-publicized hacks suffered by retailers such as Target and Home Depot in late 2013 and 2014, said Matt Kletzli, SVP and head of management liability at Victor O. Schinnerer & Company.


However, the incidents didn’t initially alarm smaller, less high-profile businesses, which assumed they wouldn’t be similarly targeted.

“But perpetrators employing bots and ransomware set out to expose any firms with weaknesses in their system,” he added.

“Suddenly, smaller firms found that even when they weren’t themselves targeted, many of those around them had fallen victim to attacks. Awareness started to lift, as the focus moved from large, headline-grabbing attacks to more everyday incidents.”

Publications such as the Director’s Handbook of Cyber-Risk Oversight, issued by the National Association of Corporate Directors and the Internet Security Alliance fixed the issue firmly on boardroom agendas.

“What’s possibly of greater concern is the sheer number of different businesses that can be affected by a single cyber attack and the cost of getting them up and running again quickly.” — Jimaan Sané, technology underwriter, Beazley

Reformed ex-hackers were recruited to offer board members their insights into the most vulnerable points across the company’s systems — in much the same way as forger-turned-security-expert Frank Abagnale Jr., subject of the Spielberg biopic “Catch Me If You Can.”

There also has been an increasing focus on systemic risk related to cyber attacks. Allnutt cites “Business Blackout,” a July 2015 study by Lloyd’s of London and the Cambridge University’s Centre for Risk Studies.

This detailed analysis of what could result from a major cyber attack on America’s power grid predicted a cost to the U.S. economy of hundreds of billions and claims to the insurance industry totalling upwards of $21.4 billion.

Lloyd’s described the scenario as both “technologically possible” and “improbable.” Three years on, however, it appears less fanciful.

In January, the head of the UK’s National Cyber Security Centre, Ciaran Martin, said the UK had been fortunate in so far averting a ‘category one’ attack. A C1 would shut down the financial services sector on which the country relies heavily and other vital infrastructure. It was a case of “when, not if” such an assault would be launched, he warned.

AI: Friend or Foe?

Despite daunting potential financial losses, pioneers of cyber BI insurance such as Beazley, Zurich, AIG and Chubb now see new competitors in the market. Capacity is growing steadily, said Allnutt.

“Not only is cyber insurance a new product, it also offers a new source of premium revenue so there is considerable appetite for taking it on,” he added. “However, whilst most insurers are comfortable with the liability aspects of cyber risk; not all insurers are covering loss of income.”

Matt Kletzli, SVP and head of management liability, Victor O. Schinnerer & Company

Kletzli added that available products include several well-written, broad cyber coverages that take into account all types of potential cyber attack and don’t attempt to limit cover by applying a narrow definition of BI loss.

“It’s a rapidly-evolving coverage — and needs to be — in order to keep up with changing circumstances,” he said.

The good news, according to a Fitch report, is that the cyber loss ratio has been reduced to 45 percent as more companies buy cover and the market continues to expand, bringing down the size of the average loss.

“The bad news is that at cyber events, talk is regularly turning to ‘what will be the Hurricane Katrina-type event’ for the cyber market?” said Kletzli.

“What’s worse is that with hurricane losses, underwriters know which regions are most at risk, whereas cyber is a global risk and insurers potentially face huge aggregation.”


Nor is the advent of robotics and artificial intelligence (AI) necessarily cause for optimism. As Allnutt noted, while AI can potentially be used to decode malware, by the same token sophisticated criminals can employ it to develop new malware and escalate the ‘computer versus computer’ battle.

“The trend towards greater automation of business means that we can expect more incidents involving loss of income,” said Sané. “What’s possibly of greater concern is the sheer number of different businesses that can be affected by a single cyber attack and the cost of getting them up and running again quickly.

“We’re likely to see a growing number of attacks where the aim is to cause disruption, rather than demand a ransom.

“The paradox of cyber BI is that the more sophisticated your organization and the more it embraces automation, the bigger the potential impact when an outage does occur. Those old-fashioned businesses still reliant on traditional processes generally aren’t affected as much and incur smaller losses.” &

Graham Buck is editor of gtnews.com. He can be reached at riskletters.com.