FCPA Compliance

Feds Encouraging FCPA Self-Reporting

The government is offering companies lower fines if they disclose Foreign Corrupt Practices Act violations.
By: | June 14, 2016 • 5 min read

Companies can take a more proactive role in managing their Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) exposures since the federal government launched a new program in April to encourage self-disclosure of misconduct.

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The government’s focus on this area is much more robust now than it has been for many years. The good news is if companies voluntarily disclose a violation, they face much more lenient penalties.

The U.S. Department of Justice increased its FCPA unit this year by more than 50 percent by adding 10 new prosecutors, according to the Washington-based law firm Wiley Rein LLP.

In the spring of 2015, the FBI also began an effort to increase its presence in this area. That agency invested an additional $15 million for FCPA investigations and set up three new fraud squads, increasing the number of agents working on FCPA matters to 23 agents from five.

The FCPA bans U.S. companies and individuals from offering bribes or anything of value to a foreign official in an attempt to get or keep business.

Ralph J. Caccia, attorney, Wiley Rein LLP

Ralph J. Caccia, attorney, Wiley Rein LLP

“The government is putting their money where their mouth is in terms of their intention to aggressively investigate and prosecute these cases,” said Ralph J. Caccia, an attorney with Wiley Rein.

Caccia is a former federal prosecutor, who now defends companies and their executives in cases involving the FCPA.

The law firm hosted a conference call on June 9 to share trends and information on FCPA enforcement with other attorneys and corporate executives.

On the call, speakers said there are about 79 FCPA investigations underway, and about 80 percent of thoses cases have roots in China.

The industries that seem to “catch the eye” of investigators include pharmaceutical, health care, telecommunications and increasingly, financial services companies, Caccia said.

$133 Million in Fines

Government investigators are not looking at small cases where, for example, there’s a one-time bribe to get a shipment in early.  They are focusing on the large cases that may result in big settlements, he said.

Larger targets result in increased settlements. In 2015, there were 11 corporate enforcement actions, with $133 million collected in fines.

So far this year, the SEC reached 11 corporate resolutions for settlements amounting to more than $506 million, according to Wiley Rein.

“They handled it the right way and got expeditious resolutions as a result.” — Kara Brockmeyer, chief, FCPA unit, Securities and Exchange Commission

This year’s settlement includes two non-prosecution agreements. In each case the companies self-reported the misconduct promptly, and they cooperated extensively with investigators, the SEC announced on June 7.

As a result, the companies were not charged with violations of FCPA and did not face extra penalties.

One company, Akamai Technologies, agreed to pay $671,885 after it found employees at a foreign subsidiary violated company policies by giving gift cards, meals and entertainment to foreign officials to build business relationships.

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Nortek Inc. agreed to pay $322,058 after disclosing that a subsidiary made improper payments and gifts to Chinese officials to gain preferential treatment, relaxed regulatory oversight or reduced customs duties, taxes and fees.

“When companies self-report and lay all their cards on the table, non-prosecution agreements are an effective way to get the money back and save the government substantial time and resources while crediting extensive cooperation,” said Andrew Ceresney, director of the SEC enforcement division.

Kara Brockmeyer, chief of the SEC enforcement division’s FCPA unit, said in a statement that “Akamai and Nortek each promptly tightened their internal controls after discovering the bribes and took swift remedial measures to eliminate the problems. They handled it the right way and got expeditious resolutions as a result.”

Increase in Global Cooperation

To snare larger violators, federal agents are increasingly working alongside law enforcement and regulatory authorities in all corners of the globe to share leads, documents and even, witnesses.

The pilot program is designed to investigate and prosecute FCPA violations, while offering companies that voluntarily disclose violations up to 50 percent below the low end of the fine range, based on U.S. sentencing guidelines.

At the end of the one-year pilot period on April 5, 2017, the DOJ will determine whether to extend or modify the program.

In addition to voluntarily disclosing misconduct and fully cooperating with the DOJ investigation, companies also must take all appropriate actions to remediate the offense and surrender all profits from the violation.

Additionally, voluntarily disclosed cases may be acted upon and closed within one year from start of the investigation and the DOJ may not appoint a monitor afterward.

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“If a company opts not to self-disclose, it should do so understanding that in any eventual investigation that decision will result in a significantly different outcome than if the company had voluntarily disclosed the conduct to us and cooperated in our investigation” said Assistant Attorney General Leslie R. Caldwell of the Justice Department’s criminal division, when the pilot program was announced.

At the end of the one-year pilot period on April 5, 2017, the DOJ will determine whether to extend or modify the program.

“The government is upping the ante in terms of what they expect to see in the way of cooperation in these cases,” Wiley Rein’s Caccia said. “They want companies to realize these violations can’t be viewed as simply the cost of doing business anymore, but that individuals could possibly go to jail.”

Appropriate Compliance Programs

Increased FCPA activity should compel changes in the way corporations conduct and document internal investigations.

Corporation should increase internal documentation to include not just what they are doing right, but also what has gone wrong and how it’s been addressed, said Daniel B. Pickard, an attorney with Wiley Rein.

Daniel B. Pickard, attorney, Wiley Rein LLP

Daniel B. Pickard, attorney, Wiley Rein LLP


“The Department of Justice continues to deputize private industry to investigate itself,” Caccia said.

Companies can stay FCPA compliant by conducting more sophisticated risk analysis and increasing periodic outside audits.

“It is undeniable we will see compliance changes matching enforcement trends,” said Pickard.

His firm sees corporations spending more money on compliance infrastructure, especially on the chief compliance officer, he said.

CCO salaries jumped in the past 12 months and those executives are getting more authority; frequently reporting to the CEO.

Juliann Walsh is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Wawa’s Director of Risk Management knows that harnessing data and analytics will be key to surviving the rapid pace of change that heralds new risk exposures.
By: | July 27, 2017 • 5 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first job was at the age of 15 as a cashier at a bakery. My first professional job was at Amtrak in the finance department. I worked there while I was in college.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

A position opened up in risk management at Wawa and I saw it as an opportunity to broaden my skills and have the ability to work across many departments at Wawa to better learn about the business.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The advancements in analytics are a success for the industry and offer opportunities for the future. I also find value in the industry focus on emerging and specialty risks. There is more alignment with experts in different industries related to emerging and specialty risks to provide support and services to the insurance industry. As a result, the insurance industry can now look at risk mitigation more holistically and not just related to traditional risk transfer.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Developing the talent to grow with the industry in specialization and analytics, but to also carry on the personal connections and relationship building that is a large part of this industry.

Nancy Wilson, director, quality assurance, risk management and safety, Wawa Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

I have had successes at all of the RIMS events I have attended. It is a great opportunity to spend time with our broker, carriers and other colleagues.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the biggest challenge facing most companies today is related to brand or reputational risk. With the ever-changing landscape of technology, globalization and social media, the risk exposure to an organization’s brand or reputation continues to grow.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The changing consumer demands and new entrants into an industry are concerning. This is not necessarily something new but the frequency and speed to which it happens today does seem to be different. I think that is only going to continue. Companies need to be prepared to evolve with the times, and for me that means new risk exposures that we need to be prepared to mitigate.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

I try to be optimistic about most things. I think the economy ebbs and flows for many reasons and it is important to always keep an eye out for signs of change.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am fortunate to have opportunities professionally that make me proud, but I have to answer this one personally. I have two children ages 12 and 9 and I am so proud of the people that they are today. They both are hardworking, fun and kind. Nothing gives me a better feeling than seeing them be successful. I look forward to more of that.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

This is really hard as there are too many favorites. I do prefer books to movies, especially if there is a movie based on a book. I find the movie is never as good. I have multiple books going at once and usually bounce back and forth between fiction and non-fiction.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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I have eaten at a lot of different restaurants in many major cities but I would have to pick Horn O’ Plenty in Bedford, PA. It is a farm to table restaurant in the middle of the state. The food is always fresh and tastes amazing and they make me feel like I am at home when I am there. My family and I eat there often during our trips out that way.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

I do love a good cup of coffee (working at Wawa helps that). I also enjoy a good glass of wine (red preferably) on occasion.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Vacations aside, I do get an opportunity to travel for work and visit our food suppliers. The opportunities I have had to visit back to the farm level have been a very interesting learning experience. If it wasn’t for my role, I would have never been able to experience that.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

My husband, kids and I recently did a boot-camp-type obstacle course up in the trees 24 feet in the air. Although I had a harness and helmet on, I really put my fear of heights to the test. At the end of the two hours, I did get the hang of it but am not sure I would do it again.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The first people that come to mind are those who are serving our country and willing to sacrifice their own lives for our freedom.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Every day is different and I have the opportunity to be involved in a lot of different work across the company.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My husband and children have a pretty good sense of what I do, but the rest of my family has no idea. They just know I work for Wawa and sometimes travel.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]