Risk Management

The Profession

At McKesson, Jane Sandler blends her passions for risk management and health care to help the organization develop innovative, forward-thinking solutions.
By: | December 14, 2016 • 4 min read

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R&I What was your first job?

My first paycheck came from bagging groceries at Kroger. I didn’t have a car and had to walk to work. My ultimate goal was to save enough money for my first car. The very car I later drove to my first insurance job in an underwriting department. It was a great feeling.

R&I How did you come to work in risk management?

Growing up in a state-controlled environment of the former Soviet Union, risk management was not on my radar. I have always had a passion for health care as it touches and influences the lives of so many. I was pre-med when a friend told me about her major – risk management and insurance. It seemed fascinating.

R&I What is the risk management community doing right?

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One of the things I appreciate the most about our industry is the depth of relationships. Trust and integrity are crucial. Risk managers form long-standing partnerships with insurers and other industry colleagues, enabling us to support each other and excel during challenging times.

At the core of everything risk managers do lays the desire to prevent injuries, enable new opportunities and protect our enterprise against volatility.

R&I What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

We could do a better job of attracting young talent. There is a stigma associated with the insurance industry — it’s perceived as boring, and that could not be further from the truth. I’ve been stretched and challenged every step of the way and feel that this is one of the more engaging professions.

I serve on the board of trustees for the Georgia State University Risk Management Foundation and one of our strategic initiatives focuses on educating college recruits on the breadth of opportunities afforded by our industry.

R&I What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, risk managers have made a huge move from being “insurance and claim guys” to becoming a trusted business adviser to the C-suite. We’ve embraced that we cannot eliminate or insure all risk. Risk-taking is an essential part of any business opportunity. But what we can do is partner with key stakeholders to better understand the risk and empower innovative solutions.

R&I What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

It’s the risks associated with new technological breakthroughs and legislative developments. Most recent examples in the health care industry are interconnectivity and value-based reimbursements. In the early stages of any initiative, much is undefined.

R&I Who is your mentor and why?

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I have been very lucky to meet many colleagues along the way that have opened doors, given me a chance and shared their expertise. Deanna Allen gave me my first opportunity in health care risk management, welcomed me with open arms, pushed me and really helped me grow in my early career.

Another individual who comes to mind is Allan Bogenschutz. He’s one of the best colleagues you could have, always willing to share his candid feedback. Allan has been a great sounding board and adviser to me over the years.

R&I What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Having emigrated here at the age of 17 from Ukraine, successfully establishing a new life is a point of both pride and immense gratitude to everyone who helped me along the way.  I am appreciative of the freedom and opportunities this country affords to anyone who’s willing to work hard and apply themselves.

R&I What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Riding on an ATV with my husband. It was all fun and games until he flipped us over. So, my zip-lining experience, in comparison, was very safe.

R&I What is your favorite book or movie?

“Kafka on the Shore” by Haruki Murakami.

R&I What is your favorite drink?

Absinth.

R&I What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

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Travel is my escape and it is hard to narrow down the wonders of the world to just one. I would say for architecture it’s the magic of Gaudi’s Barcelona. For nature, it’s the grandeur of the Alps.

R&I What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

The most fulfilling part is blazing new trails and developing innovative solutions to support my company’s growth. I am very grateful for the opportunity McKesson has afforded me in leading the risk management department in a new direction. I am lucky to have an incredibly talented global team.

We are very focused on quantification of risk in a way that is easy to communicate across the organization. McKesson’s leadership team values the role and contribution of the risk management function.

R&I What do your friends and family think you do?

I talk about it so much, I am pretty sure they know exactly what I do! To my kids, I explained that it’s planning in advance and having a plan B. Last time we were at the beach in the fall, their shoes got soaking wet and we had a spare pair in the car. I think they got it.




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2018 Most Dangerous Emerging Risks

Emerging Multipliers

It’s not that these risks are new; it’s that they’re coming at you at a volume and rate you never imagined before.
By: | April 9, 2018 • 3 min read

Underwriters have plenty to worry about, but there is one word that perhaps rattles them more than any other word. That word is aggregation.

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Aggregation, in the transferred or covered risk usage, represents the multiplying potential of a risk. For examples, we can look back to the asbestos claims that did so much damage to Lloyds’ of London names and syndicates in the mid-1990s.

More recently, underwriters expressed fears about the aggregation of risk from lawsuits by football players at various levels of the sport. Players, from Pee Wee on up to the NFL, claim to have suffered irreversible brain damage from hits to the head.

That risk scenario has yet to fully play out — it will be decades in doing so — but it is already producing claims in the billions.

This year’s edition of our national-award winning coverage of the Most Dangerous Emerging Risks focuses on risks that have always existed. The emergent — and more dangerous — piece to the puzzle is that these risks are now super-charged with risk multipliers.

Take reputational risk, for example. Businesses and individuals that were sharply managed have always protected their reputations fiercely. In days past, a lapse in ethics or morals could be extremely damaging to one’s reputation, but it might take days, weeks, even years of work by newspaper reporters, idle gossips or political enemies to dig it out and make it public.

Brand new technologies, brand new commercial covers. It all works well; until it doesn’t.

These days, the speed at which Internet connectedness and social media can spread information makes reputational risk an existential threat. Information that can stop a glittering career dead in its tracks can be shared by millions with a casual, thoughtless tap or swipe on their smartphones.

Aggregation of uninsured risk is another area of focus of our Most Dangerous Emerging Risks (MDER) coverage.

The beauty of the insurance model is that the business expands to cover personal and commercial risks as the world expands. The more cars on the planet, the more car insurance to sell.

The more people, the more life insurance. Brand new technologies, brand new commercial covers. It all works well; until it doesn’t.

As Risk & Insurance® associate editor Michelle Kerr and her sources point out, growing populations and rising property values, combined with an increase in high-severity catastrophes, threaten to push the insurance coverage gap to critical levels.

This aggregation of uninsured value got a recent proof in CAT-filled 2017. The global tally for natural disaster losses in 2017 was $330 billion; 60 percent of it was uninsured.

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This uninsured gap threatens to place unsustainable pressure on public resources and hamstring society’s ability to respond to natural disasters, which show no sign of slowing down or tempering.

A related threat, the combination of a failing infrastructure and increasing storm severity, marks our third MDER. This MDER looks at the largely uninsurable risk of business interruption that results not from damage to your property or your suppliers’ property, but to publicly maintained infrastructure that provides ingress and egress to your property. It’s a danger coming into shape more and more frequently.

As always, our goal in writing about these threats is not to engage in fear mongering. It’s to initiate and expand a dialogue that can hopefully result in better planning and mitigation, saving the lives and limbs of businesses here and around the world.

2018 Most Dangerous Emerging Risks

Critical Coverage Gap

Growing populations and rising property values, combined with an increase in high-severity catastrophes, are pushing the insurance protection gap to a critical level.

Climate Change as a Business Interruption Multiplier

Crumbling roads and bridges isolate companies and trigger business interruption losses.

 

Reputation’s Existential Threat

Social media — the very tool used to connect people in an instant — can threaten a business’s reputation just as quickly.

 

AI as a Risk Multiplier

AI has potential, but it comes with risks. Mitigating these risks helps insurers and insureds alike, enabling advances in almost every field.

 

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]