Power Broker

Power Broker Overview

What is a Power Broker?
A Risk & Insurance® Power Broker® is an individual who stands out among their peers for the exceptional client work they delivered over the past year. While brokers play many key roles in the insurance industry and risk profession, a Power Broker® award recognizes problem solving, customer service and industry knowledge.

Our goal is to broadly recognize and promote outstanding risk management and customer service among the brokerage community. Therefore, we don’t select a single winner but instead recognize four to six winners in different industry categories.

Who selects the winners?
A Power Broker® is selected based upon the strength of client testimonials. Risk & Insurance® editors and writers collect and choose the most compelling testimonials based on the award criteria.

What criteria are used to select winners?
It is very important to note that Power Broker® is focused on recent accomplishments. Certainly the below criteria could be demonstrated through the arc of an entire career, but for this program we strive to highlight recent challenges and solutions. This approach is utilized for the benefit of our readers who most value learning about challenges and solutions to current problems. The criteria are:

  • Risk Solution (50%): What specific challenge did a client face and how did the applicant/nominee solve that problem?
  • Customer Service (25%): Does the applicant/nominee demonstrate a commitment to primarily serve the interests of their clients?
  • Industry Knowledge (25%): Is the applicant/nominee committed to mastering the industry category they work in?

The focus is on the individual broker
Creativity and problem solving are critical success factors independent of firm or account size. Therefore, neither the size of a broker’s firm nor the size of an account is an important criteria for the Power Broker® program. We strongly encourage all brokers to apply.

Nomination process
Applications/nominations (referred to below as simply “applications”) are accepted from any source including a client, insurer, brokerage firm, service provider or individual broker. In the interest of maintaining a level playing field, Risk & Insurance® will accept no more than 100 Power Broker® applications from any one firm or its subsidiaries. Since the client testimonial is most important for judging, the source of the application does not impact an applicant’s chance of winning.

We require an application form to be completed in order to capture profile information, an overview of the problem/solution and client contact information. Provide enough information to give our editors an overview of you and your accomplishment but don’t feel compelled to write overly long responses. Think concise and factual.

Important Note Regarding Confidentiality: We are very conscious of the sensitive nature of the information provided. Client references listed on applications and contacted by judges may choose to be on or off the record. This includes the client name, company name and additional identifying information. All other information on the application will be considered on-the-record unless specified otherwise.

Judging process
Judges consisting of Risk & Insurance® editors and/or writers are appointed for each industry category. All of the applications in a category are first reviewed by the judges to provide an overview of the field and to ensure that the applications are complete. Client references listed on the applications are then contacted and interviewed.

A summary of the interview along with an evaluation form is completed by the judge performing the interview. Once all interviews are complete, the judging team meets to review all the interviews and evaluations. The four to six brokers that received the strongest client referrals based on the award criteria are named a Power Broker®.

Rising Star Designation

RisingStar2015.indd

Power Broker® winners and finalists who are 40 years old or younger are highlighted in the annual “Rising Star” section. Designees are determined based on the DOB listed on the Power Broker® application. No additional application is needed to apply for this designation.

Publication
Winners are first announced in the February print issue of Risk & Insurance®. The information is also posted on the Risk & Insurance® website, eNewsletter, web digital edition and iPad/iPhone Apps. A profile highlighting each Power Broker’s accomplishments along with a head-shot is presented by industry category.

Award Boxes
A few weeks after the winners are announced, each Power Broker® receives a box with a copy of the print issue, an award plaque and additional information.

Download the 2017 Logo Usage Agreement and PR Statement.

2018 Application Deadline: October 20, 2017

Winner Announcement Date: February 2018 Issue

AllStarsButton-ApplyNominate-270

2017 RIMS

Resilience in Face of Cyber

New cyber model platforms will help insurers better manage aggregation risk within their books of business.
By: | April 26, 2017 • 3 min read

As insurers become increasingly concerned about the aggregation of cyber risk exposures in their portfolios, new tools are being developed to help them better assess and manage those exposures.

One of those tools, a comprehensive cyber risk modeling application for the insurance and reinsurance markets, was announced on April 24 by AIR Worldwide.

Advertisement




Last year at RIMS, AIR announced the release of the industry’s first open source deterministic cyber risk scenario, subsequently releasing a series of scenarios throughout the year, and offering the service to insurers on a consulting basis.

Its latest release, ARC– Analytics of Risk from Cyber — continues that work by offering the modeling platform for license to insurance clients for internal use rather than on a consulting basis. ARC is separate from AIR’s Touchstone platform, allowing for more flexibility in the rapidly changing cyber environment.

ARC allows insurers to get a better picture of their exposures across an entire book of business, with the help of a comprehensive industry exposure database that combines data from multiple public and commercial sources.

Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

The recent attacks on Dyn and Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide perfect examples of how the ARC platform can be used to enhance the industry’s resilience, said Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist for AIR Worldwide.

Stransky noted that insurers don’t necessarily have visibility into which of their insureds use Dyn, Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, or other common internet services providers.

In the Dyn and AWS events, there was little insured loss because the downtime fell largely just under policy waiting periods.

But,” said Stransky, “it got our clients thinking, well it happened for a few hours – could it happen for longer? And what does that do to us if it does? … This is really where our model can be very helpful.”

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.” Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

AIR has run the Dyn incident through its model, with the parameters of a single day of downtime impacting the Fortune 1000. Then it did the same with the AWS event.

When we run Fortune 1000 for Dyn for one day, we get a half a billion dollars of loss,” said Stransky. “Taking it one step further – we’ve run the same exercise for AWS for one day, through the Fortune 1000 only, and the losses are about $3 billion.”

So once you expand it out to millions of businesses, the losses would be much higher,” he added.

The ARC platform allows insurers to assess cyber exposures including “silent cyber,” across the spectrum of business, be it D&O, E&O, general liability or property. There are 18 scenarios that can be modeled, with the capability to adjust variables broadly for a better handle on events of varying severity and scope.

Looking ahead, AIR is taking a closer look at what Stransky calls “silent silent cyber,” the complex indirect and difficult to assess or insure potential impacts of any given cyber event.

Stransky cites the 2014 hack of the National Weather Service website as an example. For several days after the hack, no satellite weather imagery was available to be fed into weather models.

Imagine there was a hurricane happening during the time there was no weather service imagery,” he said. “[So] the models wouldn’t have been as accurate; people wouldn’t have had as much advance warning; they wouldn’t have evacuated as quickly or boarded up their homes.”

It’s possible that the losses would be significantly higher in such a scenario, but there would be no way to quantify how much of it could be attributed to the cyber attack and how much was strictly the result of the hurricane itself.

It’s very, very indirect,” said Stransky, citing the recent hack of the Dallas tornado sirens as another example. Not only did the situation jam up the 911 system, potentially exacerbating any number of crisis events, but such a false alarm could lead to increased losses in the future.

The next time if there’s a real tornado, people make think, ‘Oh, its just some hack,’ ” he said. “So if there’s a real tornado, who knows what’s going to happen.”

Advertisement




Modeling for “silent silent cyber” remains elusive. But platforms like ARC are a step in the right direction for ensuring the continued health and strength of the insurance industry in the face of the ever-changing specter of cyber exposure.

Because we have this model, insurers are now able to manage the risks better, to be more resilient against cyber attacks, to really understand their portfolios,” said Stransky. “So when it does happen, they’ll be able to respond, they’ll be able to pay out the claims properly, they’ll be prepared.

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.”

Additional stories from RIMS 2017:

Blockchain Pros and Cons

If barriers to implementation are brought down, blockchain offers potential for financial institutions.

Embrace the Internet of Things

Risk managers can use IoT for data analytics and other risk mitigation needs, but connected devices also offer a multitude of exposures.

Feeling Unprepared to Deal With Risks

Damage to brand and reputation ranked as the top risk concern of risk managers throughout the world.

Reviewing Medical Marijuana Claims

Liberty Mutual appears to be the first carrier to create a workflow process for evaluating medical marijuana expense reimbursement requests.

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.

RIMS Conference Held in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]