2016 Power Broker

Power Brokers of Negotiation

In a record year for M&As, the 2016 Power Brokers excelled at marrying risk management cultures and firming up carrier relationships.
By: | February 22, 2016 • 7 min read

Spurred on by low interest rates and an appetite for scale, business leaders in 2015 sought to create market heft through mergers and acquisitions.

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Winners of the 2016 Risk & Insurance® Power Broker® award were right there with them; marrying risk management cultures, ironing out coverage gaps and redundancies, and getting the insurance carriers to behave on price.

Alex Michon, a Sacramento, Calif.-based senior vice president with Aon, is a 2016 Power Broker® in the health care category. In a health care system merger that came out of the gate as a fire drill and then dragged on for months, Michon was reminded of a key M&A consideration: the human cost in acquisitions is often underestimated.

That’s something commercial insurance brokers need to keep in mind if they are going to build productive relationships and achieve the goals of both the buyer and the seller. Many times the risk manager for the acquired company is losing his or her job. Yet they still have to perform at the top of their game to bring off the deal.

“I think the human cost is usually under-represented in terms of the stress that these people are going through,” Michon said.

In these cases the broker can be a friend to the risk manager, who might not be first in the thoughts of finance executives or other company leadership. The risk manager might be driving in to work every day, knowing that a merger is underway and be unable to tell colleagues about it; even though hundreds of jobs may soon be on the chopping block.

“We are one of the few people who can openly talk to them,” Michon said.

In most cases, Michon said, the risk manager will perform admirably, giving the brokers and carriers all the information they need to be able to write the risk of the combined companies.

But Michon has seen cases where risk managers became so concerned with their futures that they put most of their energy into job hunting.

That tension can also impact dialogues with brokers who are working on a target company account, according to Arthur J. Gallagher’s Amy Sinclair, a 2016 Power Broker® in the pharmaceutical category and a veteran of many merger deals.

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“Employees of the target company are concerned about redundancy at the acquisition partner,” Sinclair said.

“There is a good chance they may no longer have a job once the transaction closes,” she said.

Smaller brokerages that don’t have a lot of experience with M&As may dig in their heels a little bit.

“Generally speaking, brokers for the target and acquisition partner work well together,” Sinclair said.

“Regardless of what side of the transaction you are on, you still want to provide the best service to your client. It is not in anyone’s best interest to withhold information or to be uncooperative,” she said.

Carrier Relationships

The broker’s burden of relationship maintenance in the case of an acquisition also extends to those that underwrite the risks — the carriers. There is a lot of work to be done to convince the carrier that the risk they know won’t change when one company acquires another.

Herman Brito Jr., assistant vice president, Marsh

Herman Brito Jr., assistant vice president, Marsh

Marsh’s Herman Brito Jr.,  a 2016 Power Broker® in the marine category who places cargo and inland marine policies, played a part in two blockbuster deals in 2015; the acquisition by General Electric of the French electric railcar maker Alstom and the marriage of global food giants Kraft and Heinz.

Marsh was new to the Heinz account when the Kraft merger loomed. Pre-merger, Brito convinced Heinz to ditch its captive for global cargo exposures and transfer the risk to AIG. Even though Marsh wound up with both accounts, the rules of broker-client confidentiality meant that Brito couldn’t call his colleagues in Chicago — where Kraft is based — and check up on Kraft’s loss history.

Brito is a big fan of AIG’s multinational placements, calling them “best in class.” His challenge was to make sure that Kraft benefitted from the same aggressive terms he was getting for Heinz post-merger. As the cargo broker, Brito knew that the carriers had bigger concerns about things such as combined property exposures than what he was placing.

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“Not only am I asking you to make it clear and concise for Heinz/Kraft, let’s make it easy on ourselves by implementing a mergers and acquisitions clause and a multi-year rate agreement,” Brito told the underwriters.

“It took a tremendous effort to change the structure that was in place in August 2014, and to obtain the coverages implemented in May 2015, but when claims occurred they started to see the benefits in certain coverages and why we pursued those,” Brito said.

“I think the human cost is usually under-represented in terms of the stress that these people are going through.” — Alex Michon, senior vice president, Aon

The General Electric/Alstom merger was another kettle of fish.

“GE’s acquisition of  Alstom was the hardest acquisition I have ever done,” Brito said.

The reason?

General Electric has a highly centralized risk management department, four risk managers handling the entire global program. Alstom had up to 30 risk managers, many of them with local authority.

Another difference was that General Electric has a huge retention and Alstom had more of a “trading dollars” philosophy, spending so much on premium against so much in expected losses.

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Brito needed to convince the carrier that when GE bought Alstom, the cargo risk management programs would become one. Initially, the insurer wasn’t buying it. But eventually Brito convinced the underwriters that once the companies were married, Alstom’s standards would come up to GE’s.

Part of Brito’s job was to make sure he was available at any hour of the day to answer questions from Alstom risk managers around the globe and help them buy into the GE program.

“If you demonstrate that you are willing to have conference calls at a time that is most convenient in India, people are more willing to do what you are asking them to do,” Brito said.

The GE/Alstom deal closed in November of 2015. Brito was still spending a lot of time on it when we spoke to him in January.

Odd Couples

Marrying risk management cultures in a merger is a must; having the tools and the drive to convince carriers to take on the combined risk is crucial; and so is conducting enough due diligence to manage risk and provide adequate employee benefits when two very different company cultures get together.

Consider the challenges faced by Eric Wittenmyer, a 2016 Power Broker® in the health care category.

Eric Wittenmyer, senior vice president, Aon

Eric Wittenmyer, senior vice president, Aon

Wittenmyer, a senior vice president with Aon based in Chicago, was tasked with ironing out employee benefits for a large hospital system merger involving thousands of employees. One of the organizations classified hundreds of their employees as executives, eligible for a special category of benefits. The other organization counted slightly more than a dozen executives in a similar category.

“What we did was a tremendous amount of benchmarking, and an awful lot of cost modeling,” Wittenmyer said. That science determined that the hospital with the smaller group of employees classified as executives was closer to the norm.

Then came the art. That was figuring out how different employees perceived the value of certain ancillary benefits, such as life insurance and disability benefits.

Once that was determined, the in-house benefits team, with Wittenmyer’s guidance, offered one-time cash payments to employees who felt they were having a guaranteed benefit taken away, while still offering them access to an employer supported program; just not one in which the employer paid for the whole nut.

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“So once we had done all of the plan design work, we had to manage significant transitional coordination issues,” Wittenmyer said.

Because coverage of certain benefits for the merged entities was taking effect on a staggered schedule, with some benefits being in place Jan. 1, for example, and others March 1, Wittenmyer had to earn the trust of underwriters who were being asked to stay on certain programs for a few months — some of them involving high potential life insurance pay-outs — without the corresponding premium income.

In the end, Wittenmyer was able to convince the carriers to work with him, with no price increases, because of the attractive size of the merged accounts.

“I think everything was as transparent as it could be and the vendors understood that,” Wittenmyer said.

See the complete list of 2016 Power Broker® winners.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 RIMS

Resilience in Face of Cyber

New cyber model platforms will help insurers better manage aggregation risk within their books of business.
By: | April 26, 2017 • 3 min read

As insurers become increasingly concerned about the aggregation of cyber risk exposures in their portfolios, new tools are being developed to help them better assess and manage those exposures.

 One of those tools, a comprehensive cyber risk modeling application for the insurance and reinsurance markets, was announced on April 24 by AIR Worldwide.

Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

Last year at RIMS, AIR announced the release of the industry’s first open source deterministic cyber risk scenario, subsequently releasing a series of scenarios throughout the year, and offering the service to insurers on a consulting basis.

Its latest release, ARC– Analytics of Risk from Cyber — continues that work by offering the modeling platform for license to insurance clients for internal use rather than on a consulting basis. ARC is separate from AIR’s Touchstone platform, allowing for more flexibility in the rapidly changing cyber environment.

ARC allows insurers to get a better picture of their exposures across an entire book of business, with the help of a comprehensive industry exposure database that combines data from multiple public and commercial sources.

The recent attacks on Dyn and Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide perfect examples of how the ARC platform can be used to enhance the industry’s resilience, said Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist for AIR Worldwide.

Stransky noted that insurers don’t necessarily have visibility into which of their insureds use Dyn, Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, or other common internet services providers.

In the Dyn and AWS events, there was little insured loss because the downtime fell largely just under policy waiting periods.

But,” said Stransky, “it got our clients thinking, well it happened for a few hours – could it happen for longer? And what does that do to us if it does? … This is really where our model can be very helpful.”

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.”Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

AIR has run the Dyn incident through its model, with the parameters of a single day of downtime impacting the Fortune 1000. Then it did the same with the AWS event.

When we run Fortune 1000 for Dyn for one day, we get a half a billion dollars of loss,” said Stransky. “Taking it one step further – we’ve run the same exercise for AWS for one day, through the Fortune 1000 only, and the losses are about $3 billion.”

So once you expand it out to millions of businesses, the losses would be much higher,” he added.

The ARC platform allows insurers to assess cyber exposures including “silent cyber,” across the spectrum of business, be it D&O, E&O, general liability or property. There are 18 scenarios that can be modeled, with the capability to adjust variables broadly for a better handle on events of varying severity and scope.

Looking ahead, AIR is taking a closer look at what Stransky calls “silent silent cyber,” the complex indirect and difficult to assess or insure potential impacts of any given cyber event.

Stransky cites the 2014 hack of the National Weather Service website as an example. For several days after the hack, no satellite weather imagery was available to be fed into weather models.

Imagine there was a hurricane happening during the time there was no weather service imagery,” he said. “[So] the models wouldn’t have been as accurate; people wouldn’t have had as much advance warning; they wouldn’t have evacuated as quickly or boarded up their homes.”

It’s possible that the losses would be significantly higher in such a scenario, but there would be no way to quantify how much of it could be attributed to the cyber attack and how much was strictly the result of the hurricane itself.

It’s very, very indirect,” said Stransky, citing the recent hack of the Dallas tornado sirens as another example. Not only did the situation jam up the 911 system, potentially exacerbating any number of crisis events, but such a false alarm could lead to increased losses in the future.

The next time if there’s a real tornado, people make think, ‘Oh, its just some hack,’ ” he said. “So if there’s a real tornado, who knows what’s going to happen.”

Modeling for “silent silent cyber” remains elusive. But platforms like ARC are a step in the right direction for ensuring the continued health and strength of the insurance industry in the face of the ever-changing specter of cyber exposure.

Because we have this model, insurers are now able to manage the risks better, to be more resilient against cyber attacks, to really understand their portfolios,” said Stransky. “So when it does happen, they’ll be able to respond, they’ll be able to pay out the claims properly, they’ll be prepared.

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.”

Additional stories from RIMS 2017:

Blockchain Pros and Cons

If barriers to implementation are brought down, blockchain offers potential for financial institutions.

Embrace the Internet of Things

Risk managers can use IoT for data analytics and other risk mitigation needs, but connected devices also offer a multitude of exposures.

Feeling Unprepared to Deal With Risks

Damage to brand and reputation ranked as the top risk concern of risk managers throughout the world.

Reviewing Medical Marijuana Claims

Liberty Mutual appears to be the first carrier to create a workflow process for evaluating medical marijuana expense reimbursement requests.

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.

RIMS Conference Held in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]