2016 NWCDC

A Passion for Protecting Workers’ Lives

 The 2016 Teddy Award workers' compensation winners share the same fierce commitment to safeguarding the lives and livelihoods of their people.
By: | November 30, 2016 • 3 min read

Each year, the judges of the Teddy Awards diligently evaluate applications based on numerous criteria for success, including performance, innovation, sustainability and teamwork.

But our panel this year was quick to point out that those criteria — while vital — don’t always tell the whole story. The judges connected on a deeper level to those applications that included the intangible qualities of imagination, enthusiasm, energy, and most of all, passion.

It’s passion, fueled by a family legacy in the business, that drives Harder Mechanical Contractors to ensure that their workers’ lives aren’t diminished or cut short like those in generations past.  And it’s the same passion that drives the Harder team to protect every worker as fiercely as they would their own families.

It’s passion and imagination that is behind the relentless and savvy marketing campaigns that Excela Health used to keep staff actively engaged with injury prevention on a daily basis. Campaigns featuring character mascots and catchy mnemonics keep Excela’s injury prevention message at the forefront of employees’ minds at all times.

The 2016 Teddy Award winners earned our respect and our admiration for their devotion to their most important asset: their people.

It’s also passion — mixed with grit — that allowed Target to maintain a steady downward trend in losses and claims despite the departure of one-third of the company’s risk management staff.

And it’s passion for making employees part of the solution that fuels the robust “360-degree” safety and training program employed by Hampton Roads Transit that significantly decreased costs while adding collaboration and accountability.

Congratulations to all of the 2016 Teddy Award winners. They have earned our respect and our admiration for their devotion to their most important asset: their people.

Theodore Roosevelt Workers’ Compensation and Disability Management Award Winners

Learn more about the 2016 Teddy Award winners’ programs at “Steal These Ideas!” on Thursday at 8:30 – 9:45 a.m., in Room 293-295.

harder-150x150Harder Mechanical Contractors

An unwavering commitment to zero lost time is just one way that Harder Mechanical Contractors protects its people.

  • Harder Mechanical’s injury frequency and costs shrink consistently year-over-year.
  • The company logged 16 million man hours without a lost-time accident.
  • Reminding workers of what they value most helps reinforce the safety culture.

“We don’t want to just impose something upon the people out there in the field — they’re the ones turning the wrenches, and know how to do their jobs safely. So we need to get their input so they own it.” — Jennifer Massey, corporate director of safety and health and claims management

excela-150x150Excela Health

Excela Health, a health care network operating three hospitals in western Pennsylvania, abides by its mission to improve the health and well-being of every life it touches.

  • Excela Health reduced workers’ comp claims costs by hundreds of thousands over the past eight years.
  • The hospital network targets prevention efforts toward its top causes of injury.
  • Its return-to-work program keeps injured workers productive while they recover.

“We keep them working and keep them engaged and we care about them.” — Laurie English, chief human resource officer

hrt-150x150Hampton Roads Transit

Accountability and collaboration turned Hampton Roads Transit’s legacy workers’ compensation program into a triumph.

  • HRT saw a 98 percent decrease in lost-time claims frequency, a 94 percent decrease in average number of days lost per lost-time claim, a 48 percent decrease in frequency of injuries and a 78 percent decrease in total incurred costs per claim.
  • The strategy emphasizes a 360-degree employee safety and training program.
  • An annual open house educates providers about job tasks and the light-duty program.

“Everybody respects the program. We are all on the same side, working on the same goal.” — Danielle Hill, human resources compliance manager


Target brings home a 2016 Teddy Award for serving as an advocate for its workers, pre- and post-injury, across each of its many operations.

  • Target was able to reduce workers’ comp claims and lost time through an advocacy-based program.
  • Rebuilding the safety and risk management team led to discoveries of new opportunities.
  • The Workers’ Comp Assistance Center has been crucial in speeding up return to work.

“This [Workers’ Comp Assistance Center] is a service that we think is unique to us, and has really evolved to become a central part of our advocacy program.” — Amanda Lagatta, director of insurance and claims

The 2016 Teddy Award Judges

Jennifer Saddy, director of workers’ compensation, American Airlines; Anne-Marie Amiel, risk manager, Columbus, Ga.; Caryl Russo, senior vice president, corporate care, Barnabas Health Corporate Care; Mark Noonan, managing principal, Integro Insurance Brokers; Roberto Ceniceros, senior editor, Risk & Insurance®, and chair, National Workers’ Compensation and Disability Conference® & Expo.

Read comments from the judges on this year’s entrants and winners. &

The R&I Editorial Team can be reached at [email protected]

Risk Management

The Profession

Janet Sheiner, VP of risk management and real estate at AMN Healthcare Services Inc., sees innovation as an answer to fast-evolving and emerging risks.
By: | March 5, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

As a kid, bagging groceries. My first job out of school, part-time temp secretary.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Risk management picks you; you don’t necessarily pick it. I came into it from a regulatory compliance angle. There’s a natural evolution because a lot of your compliance activities also have the effect of managing your risk.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?


There’s much benefit to grounding strategic planning in an ERM framework. That’s a great innovation in the industry, to have more emphasis on ERM. I also think that risk management thought leaders are casting themselves more as enablers of business, not deterrents, a move in the right direction.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Justified or not, risk management functions are often viewed as the “Department of No.” We’ve worked hard to cultivate a reputation as the “Department of Maybe,” so partners across the organization see us as business enablers. That reputation has meant entertaining some pretty crazy ideas, but our willingness to try and find a way to “yes” tempered with good risk management has made all the difference.

Janet Sheiner, VP, Risk Management & Real Estate, AMN Healthcare Services Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, of course!  America’s Finest City has the infrastructure, Convention Center, hotels, airport and public transportation — plus you can’t beat our great weather! The restaurant scene is great, not to mention those beautiful coastal views.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The emergence of risk management as a distinct profession, with four-year degree programs and specific academic curriculum. Now I have people on my team who say their goal is to be a risk manager. I said before that risk management picks you, but we’re getting to a point where people pick it.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?


The commercial insurance market’s ability to innovate to meet customer demand. Businesses need to innovate to stay relevant, and the commercial market needs to innovate with us.  Carriers have to be willing to take on more risk and potentially take a loss to meet the unique and evolving risks companies are facing.

R&I: Of which insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion?

Beazley. They have been an outstanding partner to AMN. They are responsive, flexible and reasonable.  They have evolved with us. They have an appreciation for risk management practices we’ve organically woven into our business, and by extension, this makes them more comfortable with taking on new risks with us.

R&I: Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the U.S. health care industry and why?

I am very optimistic about the health care industry. We have an aging population with burgeoning health care needs, coupled with a decreasing supply of health care providers — that means we have to get smarter about how we manage health care. There’s a lot of opportunity for thought leaders to fill that gap.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Professionally, AMN Healthcare General Counsel, Denise Jackson, has enabled me to do the best work I’ve ever done, and better than I thought I could do.  Personally, my husband Andrew, a second-grade teacher, who has a way of putting things into a human perspective.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

In my early 20s, I set a goal for the “corner office.” I achieved that when I became vice president.  I received a ‘Values in Practice’ award for trust at AMN. The nomination came from team members I work with every day, and I was incredibly humbled and honored.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The noir genre, so anything by Raymond Chandler in books. For movies,  “Double Indemnity,” the 1944 Billy Wilder classic, with insurance at the heart of it!

R&I: What is your favorite drink?


Clean water. Check out Water.org for how to help people enjoy clean, safe water.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant at which you’ve eaten?

Liqun Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

China. See favorite restaurant above. This restaurant had been open for 100 years in that location. It didn’t exactly have an “A” rating, and it was probably not a place most risk managers would go to.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Eating that duck at Liqun!

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Dr. Seuss who, in response to a 1954 report in Life magazine, worked to reduce illiteracy among school children by making children’s books more interesting. His work continues to educate and entertain children worldwide.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

They’re not really sure!

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]