Risk Insider: Joe Cellura

Made in America

By: | February 14, 2017 • 2 min read
Joe Cellura is President, North American Casualty, at Allied World, responsible for for the production and profitability of Primary Casualty, Excess Casualty, Environmental, Surety, Primary Construction and Programs. He can be reached at [email protected]


Made in America: What does that mean once you get past the patriotic slogan? How does the insurance industry prepare for potential upswings in manufacturing on its own soil?

President Trump has been quite vocal about bringing manufacturing jobs back to the United States. U.S. manufacturing jobs declined from 17.3 million in 2000 to 12.3 million in 2015. Industry innovation and technology significantly reduced the workforce, but clearly, many jobs also moved overseas.

The Wall Street Journal’s recent analysis of S&P 500 company communications found that many companies are speaking with investors about the impact of President Trump’s priority to “increase U.S. manufacturing employment.”

Opening new plants is not as easy as purchasing an empty manufacturing plant, and hanging your sign on the door. There are a host of environmental concerns whether a company chooses to build new or to renovate an old plant.

CEOs are strategizing about this policy priority, and the insurance and risk management community must work alongside the C-suite as a critical part of the strategic process, assessing the new risk picture and preparing to manage these risks.

Preparing the Insurance Industry

A manufacturing workforce shift would require top-notch leadership and risk management focus. Insurance underwriters will be assessing the risk by looking at a company’s management leadership qualities and their ability to recruit and train quality employees.

Evaluating this changing risk picture should include a detailed look at exposures related to physical plants, the workers, the product and the bottom line. This requires a look across the full spectrum of risks.

For example, what are the liability issues that might arise from an untrained workforce?  What are the construction risks involved in renovating old or building new manufacturing plants?

Consider the environmental exposures. Opening new plants is not as easy as purchasing an empty manufacturing plant, and hanging your sign on the door. There are a host of environmental concerns whether a company chooses to build new or to renovate an old plant.

Even with mothballing, which ensures that plants that have been out of use are still ready and safe to reopen, there is concern that old plants will not be up to safety and quality standards. There are an abundance of unused manufacturing plants all over the U.S. that are gathering dust. Companies are trying to unload, clean-up and reuse them.  If old or new plants have any proximity to waterways and wetlands, executives need to think about the possibility of exposing those habitats to contaminants.

Changing Risk Assessments

For companies that have been out of the U.S. manufacturing world for some time, how will they manage these operations?

The insurance industry, along with manufacturers, will need to build a new model for this era of manufacturing risk. Standards must be set and manufacturers must meet them for underwriters to properly assess premiums. Precedent would be helpful, but too much time has passed since the 1950’s U.S. manufacturing zenith, when workers were not joined by robots on the assembly lines.

Manufacturing risk assessments changed when companies moved overseas because brokers and insurers could not physically go to the plants and assess risks on-site.  With the possibility of companies moving back, the insurance industry has to be prepared to walk the floors and understand what they are seeing.

The insurance industry, like the manufacturers, will need to enhance its focus from foreign risk control and liability underwriting to the complex domestic landscape. This domestic operating theater will present a myriad of legal, environmental and management challenges. The opportunity lies in meeting those challenges.

As we anticipate change on the horizon, we must take a broad look at the risk picture and begin to lay a foundation for a smooth transition to more American production. The first building blocks need to be safety. Risk management planning will protect manufacturers and their shareholder value.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Janet Sheiner, VP of risk management and real estate at AMN Healthcare Services Inc., sees innovation as an answer to fast-evolving and emerging risks.
By: | March 5, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

As a kid, bagging groceries. My first job out of school, part-time temp secretary.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Risk management picks you; you don’t necessarily pick it. I came into it from a regulatory compliance angle. There’s a natural evolution because a lot of your compliance activities also have the effect of managing your risk.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?


There’s much benefit to grounding strategic planning in an ERM framework. That’s a great innovation in the industry, to have more emphasis on ERM. I also think that risk management thought leaders are casting themselves more as enablers of business, not deterrents, a move in the right direction.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Justified or not, risk management functions are often viewed as the “Department of No.” We’ve worked hard to cultivate a reputation as the “Department of Maybe,” so partners across the organization see us as business enablers. That reputation has meant entertaining some pretty crazy ideas, but our willingness to try and find a way to “yes” tempered with good risk management has made all the difference.

Janet Sheiner, VP, Risk Management & Real Estate, AMN Healthcare Services Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, of course!  America’s Finest City has the infrastructure, Convention Center, hotels, airport and public transportation — plus you can’t beat our great weather! The restaurant scene is great, not to mention those beautiful coastal views.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The emergence of risk management as a distinct profession, with four-year degree programs and specific academic curriculum. Now I have people on my team who say their goal is to be a risk manager. I said before that risk management picks you, but we’re getting to a point where people pick it.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?


The commercial insurance market’s ability to innovate to meet customer demand. Businesses need to innovate to stay relevant, and the commercial market needs to innovate with us.  Carriers have to be willing to take on more risk and potentially take a loss to meet the unique and evolving risks companies are facing.

R&I: Of which insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion?

Beazley. They have been an outstanding partner to AMN. They are responsive, flexible and reasonable.  They have evolved with us. They have an appreciation for risk management practices we’ve organically woven into our business, and by extension, this makes them more comfortable with taking on new risks with us.

R&I: Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the U.S. health care industry and why?

I am very optimistic about the health care industry. We have an aging population with burgeoning health care needs, coupled with a decreasing supply of health care providers — that means we have to get smarter about how we manage health care. There’s a lot of opportunity for thought leaders to fill that gap.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Professionally, AMN Healthcare General Counsel, Denise Jackson, has enabled me to do the best work I’ve ever done, and better than I thought I could do.  Personally, my husband Andrew, a second-grade teacher, who has a way of putting things into a human perspective.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

In my early 20s, I set a goal for the “corner office.” I achieved that when I became vice president.  I received a ‘Values in Practice’ award for trust at AMN. The nomination came from team members I work with every day, and I was incredibly humbled and honored.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The noir genre, so anything by Raymond Chandler in books. For movies,  “Double Indemnity,” the 1944 Billy Wilder classic, with insurance at the heart of it!

R&I: What is your favorite drink?


Clean water. Check out Water.org for how to help people enjoy clean, safe water.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant at which you’ve eaten?

Liqun Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

China. See favorite restaurant above. This restaurant had been open for 100 years in that location. It didn’t exactly have an “A” rating, and it was probably not a place most risk managers would go to.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Eating that duck at Liqun!

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Dr. Seuss who, in response to a 1954 report in Life magazine, worked to reduce illiteracy among school children by making children’s books more interesting. His work continues to educate and entertain children worldwide.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

They’re not really sure!

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]