The Law

Legal Spotlight

A look at the latest decisions impacting the industry.
By: | October 3, 2017 • 4 min read

Invasion of Privacy Exclusion Holds Firm

In November 2012, David Emanuel brought a class action lawsuit against the Los Angeles Lakers basketball team.

Emanuel, who had attended a Lakers game the month before, felt duped after responding to an overhead message displayed on the scoreboard. The message invited game attendees to send a text to a specific phone number with the hopes of seeing their message on the screen.

Emanuel sent a text and received an automated message in return. In the subsequent lawsuit, he alleged that the Lakers sent the response message using an automatic dialing system, which, he said, violated the Telephone Consumer Protection Act and cost him and others in text and data charge fees. They sued for $1,500 and damages.

In 2013, a California district judge dismissed the case, stating that by sending the initial text, Emanuel implicitly consented to receiving a confirmation message. The team settled with Emanuel in 2014 during his appeal.

The Lakers were insured under a ForFront Portfolio insurance policy held by Federal Insurance Co. Federal denied coverage of the suit, because the insurer claimed the TCPA fell under a policy exclusion for invasion of privacy.

The Lakers sued Federal for bad faith refusal to defend or indemnify them. A district judge ruled to dismiss the allegation, agreeing with the insurer that the policy’s invasion of privacy exclusion included the TCPA. The Lakers appealed. A divided panel affirmed the judge’s ruling.


“The panel held that because a Telephone Consumer Protection Act claim is inherently an invasion of privacy claim, Federal Insurance Company correctly concluded that the underlying Telephone Consumer Protection Act claims fell under the Policy’s broad exclusionary clause,” read the court’s decision.

Scorecard: The Los Angeles Lakers are not entitled to coverage for class allegations that the team sent unwanted text messages to fans.

Takeaway: Insurance policies that exclude privacy-related claims should clarify whether TCPA claims fall within the exclusion.

Cyberattack Costs Insurer Millions

Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co. and its unit Allied Property & Casualty suffered a massive data breach on Oct. 3, 2012. Sensitive information of more than 1 million people was stolen from its databases.

The breach affected both existing and potential customers in 32 states and the District of Columbia. Social Security numbers, driver’s license numbers and Nationwide-assigned creditworthiness scores were made available by the hackers.

Shortly after the breach, the insurer notified the customers that their information was compromised. Nationwide offered free credit monitoring and a $1 million identity theft insurance coverage with no deductible to those affected.

In the August 2017 hearing, state attorneys general from each state alleged that the breach stemmed from a security lapse. Nationwide conceded that there was a “criminal data breach,” yet denied any liability for the exposed information. The company said it took the proper and immediate steps to contain the attack.

The two parties reached a settlement of $5.5 million, to be divided amongst the states and the District of Columbia. The settlement relieves Nationwide from most legal and civil liabilities but not from criminal, antitrust, securities or tax liabilities. A spokesperson for Nationwide said that the company’s security remains compliant with data security laws.

In the end, the settlement did not include allegations of data security law violations. “Protecting consumer data is something that we take seriously,” Nationwide said. The company said it will continue to strengthen cyber-security.

Scorecard: The data breach cost Nationwide $5.5 million, which will be given to those whose information was exposed.

Takeaway: Cybersecurity programs should regularly be updated and reviewed for any potential security risks, even when a program follows security laws.

WC Death Benefits Granted to Widower

A grocery store worker was in her office when she suffered cardiac arrest. A store manager heard her fall and rushed to her aid, but it was too late. Her husband filed for workers’ compensation death benefits, claiming his wife’s death was due in part to the stress of her job.

Probable cause of death was ruled to be cardiac arrhythmia, stemming from arteriosclerotic heart disease, likely worsened by obesity.

The emergency responders’ report stated that coworkers heard the deceased saying “her job was stressing her out,” and that she complained of chest pain shortly before collapsing.

The Workers’ Compensation Board granted the husband workers’ comp death benefits on Oct. 15, 2015. The employer and its carrier appealed.

In the 2017 court hearing, the employer alleged that the cardiac event was due to underlying heart disease. There was no way to prove that job stress caused her heart to stop.

New York workers’ comp law states that barring substantial evidence to the contrary, “an unwitnessed or unexplained death [that] occurs during the course of a decedent’s employment, Workers’ Compensation Law provides a presumption … that the death arose out of the decedent’s employment.”


Because there was no formal autopsy performed on the deceased, the husband used the medical report as proof his wife’s cardiac arrest was related to the stress of her job. The court ruled the deceased’s work-related stress was a “significant contributing factor,” and her husband should receive death benefits.

Scorecard: The workers’ compensation carrier will pay death benefits to the deceased employee’s husband.

Takeaway: When injury or illness occurs on the job, employers must be diligent in reporting the incident and recording each step taken.

Autumn Heisler is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Janet Sheiner, VP of risk management and real estate at AMN Healthcare Services Inc., sees innovation as an answer to fast-evolving and emerging risks.
By: | March 5, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

As a kid, bagging groceries. My first job out of school, part-time temp secretary.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Risk management picks you; you don’t necessarily pick it. I came into it from a regulatory compliance angle. There’s a natural evolution because a lot of your compliance activities also have the effect of managing your risk.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?


There’s much benefit to grounding strategic planning in an ERM framework. That’s a great innovation in the industry, to have more emphasis on ERM. I also think that risk management thought leaders are casting themselves more as enablers of business, not deterrents, a move in the right direction.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Justified or not, risk management functions are often viewed as the “Department of No.” We’ve worked hard to cultivate a reputation as the “Department of Maybe,” so partners across the organization see us as business enablers. That reputation has meant entertaining some pretty crazy ideas, but our willingness to try and find a way to “yes” tempered with good risk management has made all the difference.

Janet Sheiner, VP, Risk Management & Real Estate, AMN Healthcare Services Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, of course!  America’s Finest City has the infrastructure, Convention Center, hotels, airport and public transportation — plus you can’t beat our great weather! The restaurant scene is great, not to mention those beautiful coastal views.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

The emergence of risk management as a distinct profession, with four-year degree programs and specific academic curriculum. Now I have people on my team who say their goal is to be a risk manager. I said before that risk management picks you, but we’re getting to a point where people pick it.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?


The commercial insurance market’s ability to innovate to meet customer demand. Businesses need to innovate to stay relevant, and the commercial market needs to innovate with us.  Carriers have to be willing to take on more risk and potentially take a loss to meet the unique and evolving risks companies are facing.

R&I: Of which insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion?

Beazley. They have been an outstanding partner to AMN. They are responsive, flexible and reasonable.  They have evolved with us. They have an appreciation for risk management practices we’ve organically woven into our business, and by extension, this makes them more comfortable with taking on new risks with us.

R&I: Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the U.S. health care industry and why?

I am very optimistic about the health care industry. We have an aging population with burgeoning health care needs, coupled with a decreasing supply of health care providers — that means we have to get smarter about how we manage health care. There’s a lot of opportunity for thought leaders to fill that gap.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

Professionally, AMN Healthcare General Counsel, Denise Jackson, has enabled me to do the best work I’ve ever done, and better than I thought I could do.  Personally, my husband Andrew, a second-grade teacher, who has a way of putting things into a human perspective.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

In my early 20s, I set a goal for the “corner office.” I achieved that when I became vice president.  I received a ‘Values in Practice’ award for trust at AMN. The nomination came from team members I work with every day, and I was incredibly humbled and honored.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

The noir genre, so anything by Raymond Chandler in books. For movies,  “Double Indemnity,” the 1944 Billy Wilder classic, with insurance at the heart of it!

R&I: What is your favorite drink?


Clean water. Check out for how to help people enjoy clean, safe water.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant at which you’ve eaten?

Liqun Roast Duck Restaurant in Beijing.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

China. See favorite restaurant above. This restaurant had been open for 100 years in that location. It didn’t exactly have an “A” rating, and it was probably not a place most risk managers would go to.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Eating that duck at Liqun!

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Dr. Seuss who, in response to a 1954 report in Life magazine, worked to reduce illiteracy among school children by making children’s books more interesting. His work continues to educate and entertain children worldwide.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

They’re not really sure!

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]