The Law

Legal Spotlight

A look at the latest decisions impacting the industry.
By: | May 2, 2017 • 4 min read

Losses Due to Emails Not Covered

On june 4, 2012, an employee of accounting firm Taylor & Lieberman (T&L) received an email from a client requesting a wire transfer to a bank account in Malaysia in the amount of $94,280.

After complying with those instructions, she received another email the next day, requesting an additional $98,486 be wired to a bank in Singapore. The employee again complied. A third email request, in the amount of $128,101, raised suspicions because of a different email address.

A phone call confirmed that all three emails were fraudulent. T&L was able to recover nearly all of the monies from the first transfer, but none from the second.

The accounting firm used its own funds to reimburse the client and then sought reimbursement under its crime coverage with Federal Insurance Co., which denied the claim on June 13, 2012.

Two years later, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California ruled the firm was not entitled to coverage. On March 9, the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals agreed.

The policy, the court ruled, provided coverage for “an insured’s direct loss ‘resulting from forgery or alteration of a financial instrument by a third party.’ ” In this case, there were no financial instruments, just emails instructing the firm to wire money.

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The court also dismissed T&L’s argument that the claim was covered by computer fraud coverage because the emails were an unauthorized entry into its system.
“The ‘mere sending’ of emails does not amount to actionable trespass to a computer system,” ruled the 9th Circuit, which dismissed the case.

Scorecard: The accounting firm’s claim for $98,486 was denied.

Takeaway: The “common sense reading of the policy” contradicted the accounting firm’s arguments, the court ruled.

Insurer Must Pay for Appeal

On dec. 13, 2011, a federal grand jury indicted Mitchell Stein on 14 counts of mail, wire and securities fraud, saying he artificially inflated the stock of Heart Tronics (also known as Signalife), a medical device company.

On Dec. 20, 2011, the SEC filed a civil suit against Stein and Heart Tronics for securities fraud and falsification of records.

Stein, a founder of the company who called himself its “chief creative architect,” was found guilty of the criminal charges, sentenced to 17 years in prison and ordered to repay $5 million in “illegally-gained profits” on May 20, 2013. The SEC action resulted in Stein being ordered to pay $5.4 million.

After his criminal conviction (which subsequently was remanded for resentencing earlier this year), Stein sought defense for an appeal from Houston Casualty Co., which had issued a $5 million directors and officers policy in November 2007.

HCC denied the claim, saying the policy provided coverage only until a “final determination,” which it said was the conviction. It also argued that Stein was not an officer or director of the company.

Stein filed suit, and lost in the Superior Court of Los Angeles County. That decision was reversed by the California Court of Appeal, Second Appellate District, on March 8.

Even though Stein denied being an officer of the company in other court proceedings, his statements “do not contradict” the argument that Stein was the functional equivalent of an officer or director during the HCC policy period, the court ruled.

It also said the policy defined a claim as “any civil or criminal proceeding, and expressly included ‘an appeal from any such proceeding.’ ”

Scorecard: The insurance company must pay for the costs to appeal the conviction.

Takeaway: A “thing that is ‘final until reversed’ is not final,” the court ruled.

Maritime vs. State Law

In february 2011, peter savoie and matt delahoussaye used a crane barge to attempt to dislodge solid objects from inside an offshore well in the Atchafalaya Basin in Louisiana.

Savoie was preparing to disconnect the hydraulic gate valve from the crane when the crane came toward him and knocked him off balance. He tried to clutch the crane, but lost his grip and fell about 8 feet, resulting in a “crush-type injury to the right lower extremity.”

Savoie eventually settled his claims against his employer, Specialty Rental Tools & Supply (STS). The master services contract (MSC) had required STS to indemnify Apache Corp., which had hired STS to perform the “flow-back process” on its fixed production platform.

The MSC stated it should be enforced under maritime law unless it was inapplicable.

Even though the injury case was settled, crane owner Larry Doiron Inc. and crane operator Robert Jackson, both of whom are part of Apache, sought a court ruling that would “enforce their contractual right to defense and indemnification” under admiralty law.

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Zurich American Insurance Co., which had issued the policy for the MSC, argued the indemnity provision was void under the Louisiana Oilfield Indemnity Act.

The U.S. District Court for the Western District of Louisiana agreed with Doiron and Jackson that it had a right to defense and indemnity, and that state law did not apply. On appeal by STS, Zurich and Oil States Energy Services, the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals on Feb. 23 agreed.

While flow-back activities have little to do with traditional maritime activity, it ruled, a vessel was necessary to do the work.

Scorecard: The insurer must defend and indemnify the barge owner.

Takeaway: Because the operation could not be completed with the vessel’s crane, the case was decided under maritime law.

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]