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The Law

Legal Spotlight

A look at the latest decisions impacting the industry.
By: | April 7, 2017 • 4 min read

Court Limited Extra Expenses

In 2012, Welspun Tubular, which manufactures pipes in Little Rock, Ark., was contracted by Enterprise Products Partners to manufacture 180 metric tons of pipe for a pipeline from Cushing, Okla., to Houston, Texas.

Production was supposed to commence on July 25, 2012, with final delivery on Aug. 31, 2013, but a fire damaged the facility on July 14, 2012. Welspun and Enterprise agreed that a portion of the production would shift to Welspun Tradings, an affiliated company in India.

Welspun had a commercial insurance policy issued by Liberty Mutual Fire Insurance Co., which covered property damage, loss of business income and extra expenses at the Little Rock facility. A forensic accountant calculated the lost business income at $28 million, direct mitigation expenses of $13.4 million and nearly $500,000 in indirect overhead costs.

Liberty paid about $415,000 as “extra expenses” in reimbursement of a portion of the direct costs, leaving unpaid $13 million, as well as nearly $500,000 in indirect overhead costs.

A partial settlement was reached, and Liberty Mutual paid Welspun $22.3 million in lost business income and $1 million for “extra expenses,” to cover direct costs, based on a $1 million policy limit.

Because they disputed the amount owed Welspun for mitigation expenses — which Welspun claimed were $13.5 million to shift production to India so the entire order was not lost — both parties filed suit.

A U.S. District Court judge in the Eastern District of Arkansas ruled on Feb. 2 that the insurer did not have to “pay more than it would have paid had the business loss occurred rather than been averted.”

He granted Liberty Mutual’s request to dismiss the case.

Scorecard: The insurance company does not have to pay Welspun $13.5 million.

Takeaway: The issue revolved around the amount the insurer would have paid if Welspun had been unable to make up the lost production.

Professional Services Not Included in Coverage

On April 22, David McBride was using a cutting torch to remove bolts from a “digester lid” as part of a project to upgrade a wastewater treatment plant in Dexter, Mich.

Sparks from the torch ignited methane gas inside the tank and caused an explosion that injured McBride and killed Michael Koch, a pipefitter.

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After the accident, McBride and the estate of Koch filed a wrongful death action against Orchard Hiltz & McCliment (OHM), the engineering and architecture firm that designed the upgrade and was project engineer for the construction.

XL Specialty Insurance Co., which had issued professional liability coverage to OHM, defended it in the lawsuits.

OHM, which was listed as an additional insured on the policies of two contractors involved in the project, filed a lawsuit seeking pro rata defense and indemnification from those insurance companies: Phoenix Insurance Co. (which provided commercial general liability coverage to A.Z. Shmina, the project’s general contractor) and Federated Mutual Insurance Co., (which provided CGL coverage to Platinum Mechanical — the employer of Koch. Platinum subcontracted with Regal Rigging & Demolition — the employer of McBride.)

Both Phoenix’s and Federated’s policies excluded professional services, and the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan dismissed OHM’s suit.

On appeal to the U.S. 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, OHM argued the professional services exclusion did not apply because “some of the underlying allegations implicate ‘general project operations and work place safety’,” which OHM was not responsible for.

The appeals court said the policies issued by Phoenix and Federated “were never intended to cover professional negligence claims.”

“The substance of the underlying claims is that OHM is liable for failing to properly plan for, and take preventative measures to ensure, the safe removal of the digester tank lids it required as part of the overall treatment plant upgrade project,” according to the court’s opinion on Jan. 20.

Scorecard: The CGL carriers will not have to contribute to indemnify or defend the engineering firm.

Takeaway: The failure to supervise worksite safety was part of the firm’s professional services.

Malicious Acts Not Covered

For several months in 2015, Catalent found softgel capsules in the wrong place at its manufacturing facility in France. One batch of capsules was found in another batch of product, and capsules were found on an empty shelf on the floor. Catalent believed the incidents were “deliberate, malicious acts,” as part of a plan to extort money.

Because of the misplacements, the French pharmaceutical regulatory agency closed the facility for five months, leading to a loss in excess of $10 million.

Catalent filed a business interruption claim with U.S. Specialty Insurance Co., which denied the claim. The insurer then sought court approval of that denial. Because Catalent never received a demand for money, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York upheld that denial.

The court said the policy unambiguously required that any alteration of stock be combined with a threat “made specifically against the insured,” with a loss defined as money “surrendered by or on behalf of the insured as an extortion payment … .”

Scorecard: The insurance company does not have to pay $10 million for business interruption.

Takeaway: No coverage existed because there was no extortion money requested or paid.

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession: Curt Gross

This director of risk management sees cyber, IP and reputation risks as evolving threats, but more formal education may make emerging risk professionals better prepared.
By: | June 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first non-professional job was working at Burger King in high school. I learned some valuable life lessons there.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

After taking some accounting classes in high school, I originally thought I wanted to be an accountant. After working on a few Widgets Inc. projects in college, I figured out that wasn’t what I really wanted to do. Risk management found me. The rest is history. Looking back, I am pleased with how things worked out.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I think we do a nice job on post graduate education. I think the ARM and CPCU designations give credibility to the profession. Plus, formal college risk management degrees are becoming more popular these days. I know The University of Akron just launched a new risk management bachelor’s program in the fall of 2017 within the business school.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think we could do a better job with streamlining certificates of insurance or, better yet, evaluating if they are even necessary. It just seems to me that there is a significant amount of time and expense around generating certificates. There has to be a more efficient way.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

Selfishly, I prefer a destination with a direct flight when possible. RIMS does a nice job of selecting various locations throughout the country. It is a big job to successfully pull off a conference of that size.

Curt Gross, Director of Risk Management, Parker Hannifin Corp.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

Definitely the change in nontraditional property & casualty exposures such as intellectual property and reputational risk. Those exposures existed way back when but in different ways. As computer networks become more and more connected and news travels at a more rapid pace, it just amplifies these types of exposures. Sometimes we have to think like the perpetrator, which can be difficult to do.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

I hate to sound cliché — it’s quite the buzz these days — but I would have to say cyber. It’s such a complex risk involving nontraditional players and motives. Definitely a challenging exposure to get your arms around. Unfortunately, I don’t think we’ll really know the true exposure until there is more claim development.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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Our captive insurance company. I’ve been fortunate to work for several companies with a captive, each one with a different operating objective. I view a captive as an essential tool for a successful risk management program.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I can’t point to just one. I have and continue to be lucky to work for really good managers throughout my career. Each one has taken the time and interest to develop me as a professional. I certainly haven’t arrived yet and welcome feedback to continue to try to be the best I can be every day.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would like to think I have and continue to bring meaningful value to my company. However, I would have to say my family is my proudest accomplishment.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

Favorite movie is definitely “Good Will Hunting.”

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Tough question to narrow down. If my wife ran a restaurant, it would be hers. We try to have dinner as a family as much as possible. If I had to pick one restaurant though, I would say Fire Food & Drink in Cleveland, Ohio. Chef Katz is a culinary genius.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

The Grand Canyon. It is just so vast. A close second is Stonehenge.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

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A few, actually. Up until a few years ago, I owned a sport bike (motorcycle). Of course, I wore the proper gear, took a safety course and read a motorcycle safety book. Also, I have taken a few laps in a NASCAR [race car] around Daytona International Speedway at 180 mph. Most recently, trying to ride my daughter’s skateboard.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The Dalai Lama. A world full of compassion, tolerance and patience and free of discrimination, racism and violence, while perhaps idealistic, sounds like a wonderful place to me.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I really enjoy the company I work for and my role, because I get the opportunity to work with various functions. For example, while mostly finance, I get to interact with legal, human resources, employee health and safety, to name a few.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I asked my son. He said, “Risk management and insurance.” (He’s had the benefit of bring-your-kid-to-work day.)

Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]