The Law

Legal Spotlight

A look at the latest decisions impacting the industry.
By: | February 20, 2017 • 4 min read

Insurer Must Pay Portion of $2.4 Million in Damages

After construction of a 53-unit N.J. condominium building was completed in 2004, unit owners began complaining of leaky roofs and windows.

Cypress Point Condominium Association filed suit against Aria Towers LLC, Metro Homes LLC and Commerce Construction Management LLC (collectively, the “developer”) and various subcontractors hired by the developer including MDNA Framing Inc., which framed the building and installed the windows. The cost to replace and repair the façade was $2.4 million.

The developer sought a defense and indemnification from Evanston Insurance Co., which had issued four commercial general liability policies from 2002 to 2006. The insurer refused. The condo association then sought a determination from the court as to whether its claims against the developer were covered by Evanston’s CGL policies.

Evanston subsequently filed a complaint against Crum & Forster Specialty Co., which had issued CGL policies from 2006 to 2010 to the developer, and a commercial excess liability policy from 2008 to 2009. The suit asked that Crum & Forster share in any responsibility.

A N.J. trial court dismissed the condo’s complaint, agreeing with the insurers that faulty workmanship did not constitute property damage or an occurrence, as defined by the policies. The court ruled the developer owed the condo association $789,931 (33 percent of the total damages), and MDNA owed it $957,493 (40 percent of the total damages).

A state appeals court subsequently ruled the damages did constitute property damage. The state Supreme Court affirmed. The case was returned to the trial court to determine whether any exclusions in the policies would apply.

On Dec. 5, the court found that Evanston’s exclusions in its 2004 policy do not cover “consequential damages flowing from faulty window installation” or mold removal. At the same time, it dismissed Crum & Foster from the case because the damage predated the policies.

The policies, however, only covered “common areas” of the condo, so further hearings will determine what costs are covered. The court dismissed the condo’s individual owners from the case, permitting them to file separately for damages.

Scorecard: Further legal proceedings will determine how much of the $2.4 million in damage, minus a $50,000 self-insured retention, should be paid by Evanston.

Takeaway: The insurance company must pay “reasonable costs that are directly related to the cost of repairing consequential damages” to the condo’s common areas.

Rape Damages Not Covered

In 2011, an 18-year-old woman was served alcohol laced with rohypnol while discussing “career opportunities in the food service industry” with Ajredin “Danny” Deari, owner of Pastazios Pizza, and another man.

The woman regained consciousness in a nearby hotel room as Deari allegedly sexually assaulted her. He subsequently confessed to aggravated assault.

In 2013, the woman sued the pizzeria, Deari and the other man for bodily injury, sexual assault and negligence. Century Surety Co., which had issued a commercial general liability policy to the pizzeria, subsequently sought a court order that it had no duty to defend or indemnify the pizzeria or Deari.

After a trial, the woman was awarded $21.5 million in damages from Deari and the pizzeria, which earlier declared bankruptcy. The U.S. District Court in Dallas ruled on Jan. 4 that Century had no responsibility for the bodily injury coverage because the policy required the “occurrence” to be “an accident.”

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As for the negligence claim, the court ruled the exclusion for occurrences where the “proximate or contributing cause” arose from “liquor liability” applied to the case. It rejected the argument from the bankruptcy trustee for the pizzeria that the exclusion did not apply because neither alcohol nor rohypnol were licensed to be sold by the pizzeria, and thus could not be considered “products” under the policy.

Scorecard: The insurance company does not have to indemnify the pizzeria or its owner for the $21.5 million judgment.

Takeaway: Because the conduct was intentional, coverage for an “occurrence,” which was defined as an “accident,” is excluded.

Staffing Company Nurse Ruled an Employee

In 2010, an induced birth resulted in neonatal asphyxia, resulting in permanent brain damage. Two years later, the parents of the injured child sued Laurel Regional Hospital in Maryland and several of its doctors and nurses. The case against one of the nurses, Marie Cryer, who had been placed at the hospital by Favorite Healthcare Staffing, ultimately settled for $2.5 million.

That amount plus the defense, costing about $500,000, were paid for by Interstate Fire and Casualty Co., which issued a professional liability policy to Favorite Healthcare Staffing. Interstate sought reimbursement from Dimensions Assurance Ltd., a captive owned by the hospital.

Dimensions, which provided general and professional liability coverage, rejected the claim, stating that Cryer was not an employee.

A district court in Maryland upheld that argument, and Interstate appealed. The U.S. 4th Circuit Court of Appeals reversed the decision on Dec. 6, ruling that the hospital’s control over Cryer made her “an employee of the hospital as a matter of law.”

The court also noted that while the general liability portion of the Dimensions policy specifically excluded “agency-provided practitioners,” the professional liability section did not.

Scorecard: The hospital’s captive insurance company may be responsible for the $3 million malpractice case costs.

Takeaway: The court ruled the definitions in the insurance policy superseded the staffing company agreement.

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 RIMS

Resilience in Face of Cyber

New cyber model platforms will help insurers better manage aggregation risk within their books of business.
By: | April 26, 2017 • 3 min read

As insurers become increasingly concerned about the aggregation of cyber risk exposures in their portfolios, new tools are being developed to help them better assess and manage those exposures.

One of those tools, a comprehensive cyber risk modeling application for the insurance and reinsurance markets, was announced on April 24 by AIR Worldwide.

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Last year at RIMS, AIR announced the release of the industry’s first open source deterministic cyber risk scenario, subsequently releasing a series of scenarios throughout the year, and offering the service to insurers on a consulting basis.

Its latest release, ARC– Analytics of Risk from Cyber — continues that work by offering the modeling platform for license to insurance clients for internal use rather than on a consulting basis. ARC is separate from AIR’s Touchstone platform, allowing for more flexibility in the rapidly changing cyber environment.

ARC allows insurers to get a better picture of their exposures across an entire book of business, with the help of a comprehensive industry exposure database that combines data from multiple public and commercial sources.

Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

The recent attacks on Dyn and Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide perfect examples of how the ARC platform can be used to enhance the industry’s resilience, said Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist for AIR Worldwide.

Stransky noted that insurers don’t necessarily have visibility into which of their insureds use Dyn, Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, or other common internet services providers.

In the Dyn and AWS events, there was little insured loss because the downtime fell largely just under policy waiting periods.

But,” said Stransky, “it got our clients thinking, well it happened for a few hours – could it happen for longer? And what does that do to us if it does? … This is really where our model can be very helpful.”

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.” Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

AIR has run the Dyn incident through its model, with the parameters of a single day of downtime impacting the Fortune 1000. Then it did the same with the AWS event.

When we run Fortune 1000 for Dyn for one day, we get a half a billion dollars of loss,” said Stransky. “Taking it one step further – we’ve run the same exercise for AWS for one day, through the Fortune 1000 only, and the losses are about $3 billion.”

So once you expand it out to millions of businesses, the losses would be much higher,” he added.

The ARC platform allows insurers to assess cyber exposures including “silent cyber,” across the spectrum of business, be it D&O, E&O, general liability or property. There are 18 scenarios that can be modeled, with the capability to adjust variables broadly for a better handle on events of varying severity and scope.

Looking ahead, AIR is taking a closer look at what Stransky calls “silent silent cyber,” the complex indirect and difficult to assess or insure potential impacts of any given cyber event.

Stransky cites the 2014 hack of the National Weather Service website as an example. For several days after the hack, no satellite weather imagery was available to be fed into weather models.

Imagine there was a hurricane happening during the time there was no weather service imagery,” he said. “[So] the models wouldn’t have been as accurate; people wouldn’t have had as much advance warning; they wouldn’t have evacuated as quickly or boarded up their homes.”

It’s possible that the losses would be significantly higher in such a scenario, but there would be no way to quantify how much of it could be attributed to the cyber attack and how much was strictly the result of the hurricane itself.

It’s very, very indirect,” said Stransky, citing the recent hack of the Dallas tornado sirens as another example. Not only did the situation jam up the 911 system, potentially exacerbating any number of crisis events, but such a false alarm could lead to increased losses in the future.

The next time if there’s a real tornado, people make think, ‘Oh, its just some hack,’ ” he said. “So if there’s a real tornado, who knows what’s going to happen.”

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Modeling for “silent silent cyber” remains elusive. But platforms like ARC are a step in the right direction for ensuring the continued health and strength of the insurance industry in the face of the ever-changing specter of cyber exposure.

Because we have this model, insurers are now able to manage the risks better, to be more resilient against cyber attacks, to really understand their portfolios,” said Stransky. “So when it does happen, they’ll be able to respond, they’ll be able to pay out the claims properly, they’ll be prepared.

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.”

Additional stories from RIMS 2017:

Blockchain Pros and Cons

If barriers to implementation are brought down, blockchain offers potential for financial institutions.

Embrace the Internet of Things

Risk managers can use IoT for data analytics and other risk mitigation needs, but connected devices also offer a multitude of exposures.

Feeling Unprepared to Deal With Risks

Damage to brand and reputation ranked as the top risk concern of risk managers throughout the world.

Reviewing Medical Marijuana Claims

Liberty Mutual appears to be the first carrier to create a workflow process for evaluating medical marijuana expense reimbursement requests.

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.

RIMS Conference Held in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]