Sponsored Content: Allied World

Know Who is Handling Your Claim

Are you getting the best from your claims services? Find out what makes a great claims organization.
By: | March 3, 2014 • 3 min read

Click on the below video to hear Allied World’s senior leadership and clients discuss what makes for a great claims team:

 

Partnership and Service

Here at Allied World, our customers are true partners. We help our clients grow, adapting to new risks, and expanding into new markets and territories globally. We help our clients find solutions to their newest business challenges and help propel them toward the next phase of growth. We are there for our clients during trying times and if needed, help them get back on their feet following a crisis. We get to know our insureds and treat every claim with an individual focus. Our clients are not just numbers to us.

As a (re)insurance company, our claims team has to be top-notch. Risk managers rely on us for advice and counsel, not only when a problem occurs but as our partnership commences. With robust, in-house risk management and claims teams, we are with our clients every step of the way. The claims culture at Allied World really starts with the claims slogan: “Claims cannot be predicted, great service can be.” We’re a service organization, and we make sure we’re staffing our teams with claims experts that know the product line and oftentimes there are industry experts that can assist our clients in a way most other companies can’t.

“Claims cannot be predicted; Great service can be.”

Using this tagline to guide our team we:

  • Take a thoughtful and deliberate approach to handling claims.
  • Have an open dialogue and partnership with our insureds during the entire claims handling process.
  • Are insightful and proactive when dealing with a claim.
  • Work hard to provide the best customer service to our clients.

Specialists

We are a company of specialists. Unlike many of our competitors, our claims teams are meeting with clients, up-front and getting to know our clients before there is an issue. This is one thing that we think differentiates us from our competitors.

When hiring a new carrier, clients should ask themselves:

Who is handling my claim? Do I know them personally? Are they responsive when I need them?

Are the members of my claims team specialists? Do they understand the unique challenges that I may face? Can they help me minimize my exposures and are they willing to work with me to better understand the ever evolving regulatory environment?

You are buying claims services, handling, reputation and partnership. Allied World is here to exceed your expectations on all aspects of the claims process.

Our dedicated, in-house claims teams handle both primary and excess claims for property, casualty, professional liability, management liability and healthcare liability products globally.

Our Clients

We take pride in our service. Listen to what our clients have to say about Allied World:

“Allied World has been a strong partner of Verizon’s for a number of years, on both standard property policies as well as difficult to write coverage. The Sandy claim has again proven to be a testament to Allied World’s claims services. We received loss recoveries on multiple Allied World policies within two weeks of signing proofs of loss.”
– David Camaratta, Verizon

“Allied World’s claims handling of matters reported under our group insurance agents’ E&O policy has been outstanding—responsive, professional, skillful, and reasonable.”
– Alan Jones, Leavitt Group

We VALUE our customers and the relationship we develop with each and every one.

We pride ourselves on understanding your needs and your business long before you have a claim.

To learn more about Allied World’s claims handling capabilities, please click on the link below.

Allied World Claims Insurance

This article was produced by Allied World and not the Risk & Insurance® editorial team.



Allied World is a global provider of innovative property, casualty and specialty insurance and reinsurance solutions.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 RIMS

RIMS Conference Opens in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.
By: | April 21, 2017 • 4 min read

As RIMS begins its annual conference in Philadelphia, it’s worth remembering that the City of Brotherly Love is not just the birthplace of liberty, but it is the birthplace of insurance in the United States as well.

In 1751, Benjamin Franklin and members of Philadelphia’s first volunteer fire brigade conceived of an insurance company, eventually named The Philadelphia Contributionship for the Insurance of Houses from Loss by Fire.

Advertisement




For the first time in America — but certainly not for the last time – insurers became instrumental in protecting businesses by requiring safety inspections before agreeing to issue policies.

“That included fire brigades and the knowledge that a brick house was less susceptible to fire than a wood house,” said Martin Frappolli, director of knowledge resources at The Institutes.

It also included good hygiene habits, such as not placing oily rags next to a furnace and having a trap door to the roof to help the fire brigade fight roof and chimney blazes.

Businesses with high risk of fire, such as apothecary shops and brewers, were either denied policies or insured at significantly higher rates, according to the Independence Hall Association.

Robert Hartwig, co-director, Center of Risk and Uncertainty Management at the Darla Moore School of Business, University of South Carolina

Before that, fire was generally “not considered an insurable risk because it was so common and so destructive,” Frappolli said.

“Over the years, we have developed a lot of really good hygiene habits regarding the risk of fire and a lot of those were prompted by the insurance considerations,” he said. “There are parallels in a lot of other areas.”

Insurance companies were instrumental in the creation of Underwriters Laboratories (UL), which helps create standards for electrical devices, and the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, which works to improve the safety of vehicles and highways, said Robert Hartwig, co-director, Center of Risk and Uncertainty Management at the Darla Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina and former president of the Insurance Information Institute.

Insurers have also been active through the years in strengthening building codes and promoting wiser land use and zoning rules, he said.

When shipping was the predominant mode of commercial transport, insurers were active in ports, making sure vessels were seaworthy, captains were experienced and cargoes were stored safety, particularly since it was the common, but hazardous, practice to transport oil in barrels, Hartwig said.

Some underwriters refused to insure ships that carried oil, he said.

When commercial enterprises engaged in hazardous activities and were charged more for insurance, “insurers were sending a message about risk,” he said.

In the industrial area, the common risk of boiler and machinery explosions led insurers to insist on inspections. “The idea was to prevent an accident from occurring,” Hartwig said. Insurers of the day – and some like FM Global and Hartford Steam Boiler continue to exist today — “took a very active and early role in prevention and risk management.”

Whenever insurance gets involved in business, the emphasis on safety, loss control and risk mitigation takes on a higher priority, Frappolli said.

“It’s a really good example of how consideration for insurance has driven the nature of what needs to be insured and leads to better and safer habits,” he said.

Workers’ compensation insurance prompted the same response, he said. When workers’ compensation laws were passed in the early 1900s, employee injuries were frequent and costly, especially in factories and for other physical types of work.

Because insurers wanted to reduce losses and employers wanted reduced insurance premiums, safety procedures were introduced.

“Employers knew insurance would cost a lot more if they didn’t do the things necessary to reduce employee injury,” Frappolli said.

Martin J. Frappolli, senior director of knowledge resources, The Institutes

Cyber risk, he said, is another example where insurance companies are helping employers reduce their risk of loss by increasing cyber hygiene.

Cyber risk is immature now, Frappolli said, but it’s similar in some ways to boiler and machinery explosions. “That was once horribly damaging, unpredictable and expensive,” he said. “With prompting from risk management and insurance, people were educated about it and learned how to mitigate that risk.

“Insurance is just one tool in the toolbox. A true risk manager appreciates and cares about mitigating the risk and not just securing a lower insurance rate.

“Someone looking at managing risk for the long term will take a longer view, and as a byproduct, that will lead to lower insurance rates.”

Whenever technology has evolved, Hartwig said, insurance has been instrumental in increasing safety, whether it was when railroads eclipsed sailing ships for commerce, or when trucking and aviation took precedence.

The risks of terrorism and cyber attacks have led insurance companies and brokers to partner with outside companies with expertise in prevention and reduction of potential losses, he said. That knowledge is transmitted to insureds, who are provided insurance coverage that results in financial resources even when the risk management methods fail to prevent a cyber attack.

Advertisement




This year’s RIMS Conference in Philadelphia shares with risk managers much of the knowledge that has been developed on so many critical exposures. Interestingly enough, the opening reception is at The Franklin Institute, which celebrates some of Ben Franklin’s innovations.

But in-depth sessions on a variety of industry sectors as well as presentations on emerging risks, cyber risk management, risk finance, technology and claims management, as well as other issues of concern help risk managers prepare their organizations to face continuing disruption, and take advantage of successful mitigation techniques.

“This is just the next iteration of the insurance world,” Hartwig said. “The insurance industry constantly reinvents itself. It is always on the cutting edge of insuring new and different risks and that will never change.” &

Anne Freedman is managing editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]