Sponsored: Delphi Technology Inc.

Insurers Challenged By New Technology Driven Landscape

A legacy administration platform that is modern and adaptable to ever-changing market conditions is critical to P&C insurers.
By: | February 1, 2017 • 5 min read

A host of new technologies is creating a new reality for insurers; one that includes competition from non-traditional players and small carriers, and one where speed to market is more critical than ever to gain an advantage.

Technology has made it easier for more entities to enter the market. Smaller, newer insurers typically have more updated systems and can adapt to change more nimbly, giving them an edge over their larger and older counterparts. Non-traditional companies, specializing in the creation of new tools, apps and software, are starting to fill a need for customers and agents that previously fell to insurers who now may be struggling to keep up.

“Carriers are under siege from non-traditional players,” said John J. Flavin, Senior Vice President and Chief Business Development Officer, Delphi Technology. “They’re starting to edge in to provide modern systems and additional data sources for the industry, agents’ manual processes for collecting information are fading out.”

As with any change, those who can’t adapt quickly stand to fall behind.

To succeed in this new reality, insurers need to shed the constraints of their legacy administration systems in exchange for a more modern, flexible platform that conforms to changing customer demand quickly and can get products to market ahead of the competition.

Overcoming Cumbersome Systems

john-flavin_large_230

John Flavin, Senior Vice President and Chief Business Development Officer

Legacy policy administration systems are built on code and can only be changed with the help of a skilled programmer changing code by hand on the back end. No handy user interface here. Updating and maintaining products means enlisting the IT department, and the process can be complex and time consuming.

Additionally, legacy systems allow little room for communication and collaboration with either internal stakeholders or external parties like agents. This adds even more time to the project of updating a policy and gaining approval from those parties. Collecting data from agents and input from other stakeholders, and incorporating that information into the product through a legacy system is time-consuming. Those delays matter when speed to market is a key competitive factor.

A flexible, rules-and-tools based system, on the other hand, can more easily conform to a carrier’s workflow and adapt to change.

Delphi Policy, built on Delphi Technology’s new Velocity platform, provides that flexibility.

“Delphi Policy is a rules and tools based modern platform that allows carriers to respond to market needs and connect with their customers more easily. It becomes the central point of contact from a point-of-sale perspective for underwriters to do business,” Flavin said.

A flexible platform like Velocity can support both a collaborative workflow as well as increasingly popular straight-through processing. Straight-through processing, or automated underwriting, allows policy submissions or renewals to be processed start to finish almost entirely untouched by human hands.

As long as a submission meets criteria set by the underwriter, the system can generate a quote, bind the coverage and issue a policy. The underwriter would only have to look at those outlier submissions that trigger what Flavin calls underwriting referrals or “knockout” questions: responses that fail to meet certain criteria like loss ratio, premium, class code or loss history threshold requirements.

With a modern system, underwriting management has more freedom to set underwriting  criteria and mandatory questions themselves. This increases the quality of submissions, processing efficiency and the performance of the underwriter.

Modern systems can integrate with 3rd party data sources to pre-fill submissions, which significantly cuts down on the time it takes to collect relevant information and provides the user with a better online experience.

Delphi Policy’s ability to import and export data to other modules so other parties can view it also allows for communication and collaboration between underwriter, claims examiner, billing manager and agent. This makes for a more interactive user experience for colleagues, agents and customers and allows the underwriter to quickly resolve any questions.

“Policyholders are getting used to communicating with agents and carriers in a variety of electronic methods,” Flavin said. “The Velocity platform supports that collaboration, exchange of information and interaction with role based, context sensitive access to information.

Prepping New Products with Delphi Policy

In conjunction with Delphi’s Accelerator product workbench, underwriters can maintain rates, rules and forms for existing products or create new ones in a “sandbox” environment, allowing them to test launch and share new policies with stakeholders before going to production. The Delphi Accelerator dashboard — a central, business-friendly work area that provides access to multiple tools and modules simultaneously — deploys products directly to Delphi Policy when they’re ready for production.

“It takes months of code and/or configuration in order to create and launch products in a test environment with legacy systems. It takes a lot more research and business planning to decide if you want to deploy your resources to create a test bed of any kind,” Flavin said.

With Delphi Accelerator, it’s easier to react to market demands. Product managers can test out new deductible or coverage options, and model a book of business based on the changes. And because changes can be made using a built-in tool, rather than through adjusting code in the back end, business users don’t need to call in IT to get the job done.

Because Delphi Policy is available as a cloud-based solution, it can take hardware maintenance out of the equation altogether. And with the integration of Delphi’s claims and billing modules, it provides a one-stop-shop suite of tools for full policy lifecycle management.

To learn more about Delphi Policy, visit www.Delphi-Tech.com.

SponsoredContent

BrandStudioLogo

This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Delphi Technology Inc. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Delphi Technology is the recognized leader in technology solutions for medical professional liability insurance and an emerging provider of technology solutions for property and casualty insurance.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Verizon’s risk manager David Cammarata loves when his team can make a real impact on the bottom line.
By: | May 2, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was a financial analyst with the N.J. Casino Control Commission.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

I was told at a Christmas luncheon in 2003 that I was being promoted into a new job.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

Advertisement




I think the risk management community is getting a lot better at utilizing big data and analytics to manage risk. Significant improvements have been made, but there is still much more room for improvement.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

I think that the insurance and brokerage communities need to really start thinking about what this industry is going to look like in 10 years. They need to start addressing how they are going to remain relevant. I think that major disruptions to existing business models will occur and that these disruptions combined with innovation and technological advances may catch many of today’s industry leaders by surprise.

David Cammarata, assistant treasurer, risk management and insurance, Verizon Communications Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

San Diego, any year.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the advent of cyber risk and cyber insurance. For several years it has been, and it continues to be, the main topic of discussion at industry meetings.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

Advertisement




Advertisement




I think the most scary scenarios include a nuclear, biological, chemical or radiological event, a widespread global health epidemic and/or a widespread state sponsored cyber shutdown.

R&I: How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We do almost all of our business through a broker.

R&I: Is the contingent commission controversy overblown?

No. It’s a conflict.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

Optimistic because hopefully President Trump’s policies (lower taxes and less regulation) will be pro-business and good for the economy.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My dad, who passed away many years ago. He was very influential during the formative years of my career. He taught me how important integrity and reputation were to your brand and he had a very strong work ethic.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I would have to say raising two awesome kids. My daughter is graduating from James Madison University this year as co-valedictorian. My son is finishing his sophomore year at Rutgers and has near perfect grades. But more importantly, both of my kids have turned out to be really good people.

R&I: How many emails do you get in a day?

A lot.

“I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.”

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“My Cousin Vinny.” That movie makes me laugh no matter how many times I watch it.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Advertisement




Advertisement




My dad used to take me to a place called Chick & Nello’s. It was an Italian place that did not have a menu. They came to your table and told you the two or three items they were making that day. The food was out of this world.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

Iced tea. The non-alcoholic kind.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

I can think of several places but for me it would be a tie between India and Italy. India just has such a different culture and way of life and Rome has breathtaking historical sites.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Well, one of the best thrill rides I’ve been on was Kingda Ka at Great Adventure. It feels risky but probably isn’t all that risky. I flew in a prop plane with my brother-in-law one time … that felt kind of risky. I have also parasailed, does that count? I think it definitely has to be driving on the N.J. Turnpike day in and day out.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

Advertisement




What about the Fukushima 50? I don’t think I could have done what they did.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I love it when the risk management organization is able to contribute in a way that makes a real impact to the corporation’s overall objectives. On several occasions we have been able to make real contributions to the bottom line.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

I don’t think they really know. My children see me as dad; others just see me as an executive with Verizon.




Katie Siegel is a staff writer at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]