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Insurance Solutions for 4 Critical Business Challenges

It's time to think differently about insurance.
By: | March 3, 2014 • 5 min read

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“Instead of thinking outside the box, get rid of the box.”
-Deepak Chopra

As globalization and technological innovation continue at a relentless pace, businesses are faced with new and unexpected risks. Companies need to manage these exposures as well as ensure regulatory compliance on a global scale. All the while, heightened competition demands constant innovation and improvement while maintaining financial flexibility and maximizing shareholder returns. It’s not easy.

Insurance is a vital tool that helps companies thrive in this difficult business world. And sophisticated practitioners of advanced risk management strategies understand that insurance can do much more than just cover traditional risks with a standard, annual policy.

At AIG, Global Risk Solutions (GRS) specializes in creating nontraditional solutions to unique risks and strives to be on the forefront of utilizing insurance in new ways. Whether it’s a Global Fronting Program that meets a company’s regulatory requirements for insurance, or a customized Alternative Solution that leverages innovative structures to insure complex or unusual risks, GRS utilizes a consultative approach to understand complicated challenges and structure programs tailored to the requirements.

The following case studies demonstrate how GRS designed insurance solutions to solve four pressing business problems.

1. State Lottery Worried “Lucky Numbers” Will Actually Hit

Some risks are truly unique. And while the risk may not have broad applicability, the approach used to address the challenge often provides insight into the ways that creative insurance solutions can apply to areas far afield from traditional insurable perils.

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Example: In state lotteries, certain numbers get played much more often than others. When those “lucky numbers” are drawn as winners, there is the potential for a higher-than-average number of winning tickets.

Insurance Solution: To protect itself against such an outcome, one state lottery group sought catastrophe-like insurance coverage for the amount of the lottery’s annual payout that exceeded a fixed percentage of its annual revenue. By utilizing data collected by the lottery over 20 years, GRS structured a program that protected the state lottery from the adverse cash outflow resulting from one of the popular number sets being drawn. The program’s five-year term assured stable pricing and guaranteed capacity.

2. Prove It

Many risk professionals solely view insurance as a means for transferring risk, which limits their thinking of how insurance can address a wide variety of challenging issues. “This limitation is particularly relevant when risk transfer is not the motivation for the insurance purchase,” said Scherzer. “For example, when the sole need for insurance is to provide evidence of insurance to meet a regulatory requirement, paying to transfer the risk to a third party may be an unnecessary expense.”

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“We can’t solve problems by using the same kind of thinking we used when we created them.”
– Albert Einstein

Example: A food-and-beverage company was comfortable retaining risk rather than transferring it to a third party but faced a requirement for locally admitted policies. The company needed insurance coverage for a number of different lines of business to protect against risks that included strikes, loss of key suppliers, cyber risk, event cancellation, property catastrophe, credit risk and more.

Insurance Solution: GRS designed a multiline fronted program with a substantial limit where AIG companies fronted the insurance policies for the different lines of insurance, and the risk was reinsured back to the company’s captive. This program enabled the company to satisfy the requirement for locally admitted policies, benefit from favorable loss experience and address different types of exposures, some of which were difficult to insure in the traditional insurance market.

3. Don’t Let Risks Hold up a Merger

Negotiating a company’s sale is always a complicated process, particularly in industries with long-tail risk exposures.

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Example: A transportation company with three divisions — auto, bus and taxi — was being sold. The buyer estimated the transportation company’s exposure to auto liability to be $10 million higher than the seller’s estimate. In order to avoid reducing the sale price, the seller pursued an insurance solution to address the buyer’s concern.

Insurance Solution: GRS designed a program providing retrospective excess auto liability coverage with $10 million limits funded by the seller. At the end of the seven-year policy term, any remaining money (plus interest) not paid out for claims, is returned to the seller. The structure enabled the seller to get his sale price and potentially benefit financially if the actual losses end up lower than the buyer expected.

4. Un-trap Your Cash

Businesses want to avoid posting collateral that will trap cash because a counterparty doesn’t truly understand the risk created by certain activities. In many cases, it’s better to replace a capital requirement with an insurance policy that will not reduce the company’s liquidity position. The value to the customer may not be in the reduction of costs, but in freeing up lines of credit and releasing working capital for other applications.

Example: For its employer’s liability risks, a manufacturing company’s captive insurer maintained collateral in the form of letters of credit. The parent company wanted to reduce the amount of collateral letters of credit provided by its captive to the insurance companies that front for it.

Insurance Solution: GRS structured a buyout of the captive’s underlying insurance policies, which eliminated the need for the company to post collateral to cover the risk.

The Takeaway

It’s time to think differently about risk and insurance. The examples above show that the world is changing and businesses need insurance solutions that are adaptable, creative and meaningful for companies to thrive in this interconnected, globalized world.

AIG’s GRS is more than a traditional insurance provider — it’s a problem-solver with a wide array of resources to address risk. Learn more about GRS here.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with AIG. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




AIG is a leading international insurance organization serving customers in more than 100 countries.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

2017 RIMS

Resilience in Face of Cyber

New cyber model platforms will help insurers better manage aggregation risk within their books of business.
By: | April 26, 2017 • 3 min read

As insurers become increasingly concerned about the aggregation of cyber risk exposures in their portfolios, new tools are being developed to help them better assess and manage those exposures.

One of those tools, a comprehensive cyber risk modeling application for the insurance and reinsurance markets, was announced on April 24 by AIR Worldwide.

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Last year at RIMS, AIR announced the release of the industry’s first open source deterministic cyber risk scenario, subsequently releasing a series of scenarios throughout the year, and offering the service to insurers on a consulting basis.

Its latest release, ARC– Analytics of Risk from Cyber — continues that work by offering the modeling platform for license to insurance clients for internal use rather than on a consulting basis. ARC is separate from AIR’s Touchstone platform, allowing for more flexibility in the rapidly changing cyber environment.

ARC allows insurers to get a better picture of their exposures across an entire book of business, with the help of a comprehensive industry exposure database that combines data from multiple public and commercial sources.

Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

The recent attacks on Dyn and Amazon Web Services (AWS) provide perfect examples of how the ARC platform can be used to enhance the industry’s resilience, said Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist for AIR Worldwide.

Stransky noted that insurers don’t necessarily have visibility into which of their insureds use Dyn, Amazon Web Services, Rackspace, or other common internet services providers.

In the Dyn and AWS events, there was little insured loss because the downtime fell largely just under policy waiting periods.

But,” said Stransky, “it got our clients thinking, well it happened for a few hours – could it happen for longer? And what does that do to us if it does? … This is really where our model can be very helpful.”

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.” Scott Stransky, assistant vice president and principal scientist, AIR Worldwide

AIR has run the Dyn incident through its model, with the parameters of a single day of downtime impacting the Fortune 1000. Then it did the same with the AWS event.

When we run Fortune 1000 for Dyn for one day, we get a half a billion dollars of loss,” said Stransky. “Taking it one step further – we’ve run the same exercise for AWS for one day, through the Fortune 1000 only, and the losses are about $3 billion.”

So once you expand it out to millions of businesses, the losses would be much higher,” he added.

The ARC platform allows insurers to assess cyber exposures including “silent cyber,” across the spectrum of business, be it D&O, E&O, general liability or property. There are 18 scenarios that can be modeled, with the capability to adjust variables broadly for a better handle on events of varying severity and scope.

Looking ahead, AIR is taking a closer look at what Stransky calls “silent silent cyber,” the complex indirect and difficult to assess or insure potential impacts of any given cyber event.

Stransky cites the 2014 hack of the National Weather Service website as an example. For several days after the hack, no satellite weather imagery was available to be fed into weather models.

Imagine there was a hurricane happening during the time there was no weather service imagery,” he said. “[So] the models wouldn’t have been as accurate; people wouldn’t have had as much advance warning; they wouldn’t have evacuated as quickly or boarded up their homes.”

It’s possible that the losses would be significantly higher in such a scenario, but there would be no way to quantify how much of it could be attributed to the cyber attack and how much was strictly the result of the hurricane itself.

It’s very, very indirect,” said Stransky, citing the recent hack of the Dallas tornado sirens as another example. Not only did the situation jam up the 911 system, potentially exacerbating any number of crisis events, but such a false alarm could lead to increased losses in the future.

The next time if there’s a real tornado, people make think, ‘Oh, its just some hack,’ ” he said. “So if there’s a real tornado, who knows what’s going to happen.”

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Modeling for “silent silent cyber” remains elusive. But platforms like ARC are a step in the right direction for ensuring the continued health and strength of the insurance industry in the face of the ever-changing specter of cyber exposure.

Because we have this model, insurers are now able to manage the risks better, to be more resilient against cyber attacks, to really understand their portfolios,” said Stransky. “So when it does happen, they’ll be able to respond, they’ll be able to pay out the claims properly, they’ll be prepared.

The purpose of having this model is to make the world more resilient … that’s really the goal.”

Additional stories from RIMS 2017:

Blockchain Pros and Cons

If barriers to implementation are brought down, blockchain offers potential for financial institutions.

Embrace the Internet of Things

Risk managers can use IoT for data analytics and other risk mitigation needs, but connected devices also offer a multitude of exposures.

Feeling Unprepared to Deal With Risks

Damage to brand and reputation ranked as the top risk concern of risk managers throughout the world.

Reviewing Medical Marijuana Claims

Liberty Mutual appears to be the first carrier to create a workflow process for evaluating medical marijuana expense reimbursement requests.

Cyber Threat Will Get More Difficult

Companies should focus on response, resiliency and recovery when it comes to cyber risks.

RIMS Conference Held in Birthplace of Insurance in US

Carriers continue their vital role of helping insureds mitigate risks and promote safety.

Michelle Kerr is associate editor of Risk & Insurance. She can be reached at [email protected]