Risk Insider: Warren Berey

The Importance of Duty of Care for International Employers

By: | March 6, 2017 • 2 min read
Warren Berey is SVP of Multinational Insurance at Generali Global Corporate & Commercial U.S.A., overseeing the development of international casualty and package insurance solutions for U.S. companies and U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies. He can be reached at [email protected]

Among the more difficult tasks corporate risk managers face is identifying possible threats to employees that engage in business travel and international assignments.

While most firms ostensibly recognize that they have a moral obligation to ensure the safety of employees working in foreign areas, some do not understand the scope of these responsibilities and are ill prepared to deal with the possible fallout of disaster scenarios.

This may seem like a straightforward issue that any qualified risk management team should be able to handle on its own, but it’s not. Implementing a comprehensive program to ensure appropriate worldwide coverages and services that address potential scenarios is a complicated, detailed process.

Putting together the right solution often requires a tremendous amount of input from risk management experts inclusive of experienced global brokers and insurers that work on behalf of a given company on a case-by-case basis.

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Quite simply, there is no one-size-fits-all risk management solution to ensure all duty of care obligations are met around the world. What qualifies as reasonable coverage in one country or for one organization’s needs may be entirely inadequate in another instance.

Therefore, risk managers must go the extra mile to ensure their international workforce is fully protected. If they don’t, the company could face long, drawn-out lawsuits capable of inflicting tremendous financial and reputational damage. While there are obvious risk management protections, lawsuits can arise from a wide range of occurrences – from everyday accidents to complex global threats.

In fact, there are countless instances where organizations failed to implement adequate risk management policies to address their duty of care and keep employees safe with respect to the potential hazards of each location. The fallout of such failures is severe, not only for families who have experienced devastating loss, but also for companies forced to deal with the legal, financial and reputational consequences.

This may seem like a straightforward issue that any qualified risk management team should be able to handle on its own, but it’s not.

Therefore, the importance of comprehensive international risk management policies to address adequate duty of care responsibilities should be abundantly clear. And in order to implement the best solutions, it is essential to partner with the right insurer.

Working with an experienced carrier with a global network that can coordinate local policies around the world ensures flexible, cost-effective solutions that optimize coverage and service. Unfortunately, companies often develop patchwork strategies that rely on fragmented programs put together by unrelated insurance brokers and carriers, which can lead to inefficiencies and dangerous gaps in coverage.

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Experienced global insurers utilize a mature network of providers to ensure service, regulatory and legal compliance, risk engineering, and expert claims handling. Further, companies with a seasoned network have local operations that rely on established strategic relationships with thoroughly vetted legal, security, medical and other providers. This in turn allows carriers to offer flexible solutions, optimize the response to damages and threats, keep claim expenses in line and policy costs competitive.

Having the right resources in place can mean the difference between an expensive payout and walking away from a questionable lawsuit or fraudulent claim.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

Wawa’s Director of Risk Management knows that harnessing data and analytics will be key to surviving the rapid pace of change that heralds new risk exposures.
By: | July 27, 2017 • 5 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My first job was at the age of 15 as a cashier at a bakery. My first professional job was at Amtrak in the finance department. I worked there while I was in college.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

A position opened up in risk management at Wawa and I saw it as an opportunity to broaden my skills and have the ability to work across many departments at Wawa to better learn about the business.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The advancements in analytics are a success for the industry and offer opportunities for the future. I also find value in the industry focus on emerging and specialty risks. There is more alignment with experts in different industries related to emerging and specialty risks to provide support and services to the insurance industry. As a result, the insurance industry can now look at risk mitigation more holistically and not just related to traditional risk transfer.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Developing the talent to grow with the industry in specialization and analytics, but to also carry on the personal connections and relationship building that is a large part of this industry.

Nancy Wilson, director, quality assurance, risk management and safety, Wawa Inc.

R&I: What was the best location and year for the RIMS conference and why?

I have had successes at all of the RIMS events I have attended. It is a great opportunity to spend time with our broker, carriers and other colleagues.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I think the biggest challenge facing most companies today is related to brand or reputational risk. With the ever-changing landscape of technology, globalization and social media, the risk exposure to an organization’s brand or reputation continues to grow.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The changing consumer demands and new entrants into an industry are concerning. This is not necessarily something new but the frequency and speed to which it happens today does seem to be different. I think that is only going to continue. Companies need to be prepared to evolve with the times, and for me that means new risk exposures that we need to be prepared to mitigate.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the U.S. economy or pessimistic and why?

I try to be optimistic about most things. I think the economy ebbs and flows for many reasons and it is important to always keep an eye out for signs of change.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am fortunate to have opportunities professionally that make me proud, but I have to answer this one personally. I have two children ages 12 and 9 and I am so proud of the people that they are today. They both are hardworking, fun and kind. Nothing gives me a better feeling than seeing them be successful. I look forward to more of that.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

This is really hard as there are too many favorites. I do prefer books to movies, especially if there is a movie based on a book. I find the movie is never as good. I have multiple books going at once and usually bounce back and forth between fiction and non-fiction.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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I have eaten at a lot of different restaurants in many major cities but I would have to pick Horn O’ Plenty in Bedford, PA. It is a farm to table restaurant in the middle of the state. The food is always fresh and tastes amazing and they make me feel like I am at home when I am there. My family and I eat there often during our trips out that way.

R&I: What is your favorite drink?

I do love a good cup of coffee (working at Wawa helps that). I also enjoy a good glass of wine (red preferably) on occasion.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Vacations aside, I do get an opportunity to travel for work and visit our food suppliers. The opportunities I have had to visit back to the farm level have been a very interesting learning experience. If it wasn’t for my role, I would have never been able to experience that.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

My husband, kids and I recently did a boot-camp-type obstacle course up in the trees 24 feet in the air. Although I had a harness and helmet on, I really put my fear of heights to the test. At the end of the two hours, I did get the hang of it but am not sure I would do it again.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

The first people that come to mind are those who are serving our country and willing to sacrifice their own lives for our freedom.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

Every day is different and I have the opportunity to be involved in a lot of different work across the company.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My husband and children have a pretty good sense of what I do, but the rest of my family has no idea. They just know I work for Wawa and sometimes travel.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]