Risk Insider: Warren Berey

The Importance of Duty of Care for International Employers

By: | March 6, 2017 • 2 min read
Warren Berey is SVP of Multinational Insurance at Generali Global Corporate & Commercial U.S.A., overseeing the development of international casualty and package insurance solutions for U.S. companies and U.S. subsidiaries of foreign companies. He can be reached at [email protected]

Among the more difficult tasks corporate risk managers face is identifying possible threats to employees that engage in business travel and international assignments.

While most firms ostensibly recognize that they have a moral obligation to ensure the safety of employees working in foreign areas, some do not understand the scope of these responsibilities and are ill prepared to deal with the possible fallout of disaster scenarios.

This may seem like a straightforward issue that any qualified risk management team should be able to handle on its own, but it’s not. Implementing a comprehensive program to ensure appropriate worldwide coverages and services that address potential scenarios is a complicated, detailed process.

Putting together the right solution often requires a tremendous amount of input from risk management experts inclusive of experienced global brokers and insurers that work on behalf of a given company on a case-by-case basis.

Quite simply, there is no one-size-fits-all risk management solution to ensure all duty of care obligations are met around the world. What qualifies as reasonable coverage in one country or for one organization’s needs may be entirely inadequate in another instance.

Therefore, risk managers must go the extra mile to ensure their international workforce is fully protected. If they don’t, the company could face long, drawn-out lawsuits capable of inflicting tremendous financial and reputational damage. While there are obvious risk management protections, lawsuits can arise from a wide range of occurrences – from everyday accidents to complex global threats.

In fact, there are countless instances where organizations failed to implement adequate risk management policies to address their duty of care and keep employees safe with respect to the potential hazards of each location. The fallout of such failures is severe, not only for families who have experienced devastating loss, but also for companies forced to deal with the legal, financial and reputational consequences.

This may seem like a straightforward issue that any qualified risk management team should be able to handle on its own, but it’s not.

Therefore, the importance of comprehensive international risk management policies to address adequate duty of care responsibilities should be abundantly clear. And in order to implement the best solutions, it is essential to partner with the right insurer.

Working with an experienced carrier with a global network that can coordinate local policies around the world ensures flexible, cost-effective solutions that optimize coverage and service. Unfortunately, companies often develop patchwork strategies that rely on fragmented programs put together by unrelated insurance brokers and carriers, which can lead to inefficiencies and dangerous gaps in coverage.

Experienced global insurers utilize a mature network of providers to ensure service, regulatory and legal compliance, risk engineering, and expert claims handling. Further, companies with a seasoned network have local operations that rely on established strategic relationships with thoroughly vetted legal, security, medical and other providers. This in turn allows carriers to offer flexible solutions, optimize the response to damages and threats, keep claim expenses in line and policy costs competitive.

Having the right resources in place can mean the difference between an expensive payout and walking away from a questionable lawsuit or fraudulent claim.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

In the Fast-Paced World of Retail, This Risk Manager Strives to Mitigate Risks Proactively and Keep Senior Leaders Informed

Janine Kral works to identify and mitigate risks, building strong partnerships with leaders and ensuring they see her as support rather than a blocker. 
By: | October 29, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

My very first paid job was working on my uncle’s ranch in British Columbia in the summers. He had cattle, horses and grapes — an unusual combo. But my first real job out of college was as a multi-line claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Right out of college I applied for a job that turned out to be a claims adjuster at Liberty Mutual. I accepted because they were offering six weeks of training in Southern California, and at the time that sounded really fun. I spent about three years at Liberty Mutual and then I spent a short period of time at a smaller regional insurance company that hired me to start a workers’ compensation claims administration program.

I was hired at Nordstrom as the Washington Region Risk Manager, which was my first job in risk management. When I started at Nordstrom, the risk management department had about five people, and over the years it has grown to about 75. I’ve been vice president for 11 years.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

I would say that technology has probably been the biggest change. When I started many years ago, it was all paper and no RMIS.

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R&I: What risks does the retail industry face that are unique?

We deal with a lot of people — employees and customers. With physical brick and mortar settings, there are the unique exposures with people moving in and out in a public environment. And of course, with ecommerce, we have a lot of customer and employee data, which creates cyber risk — which is not necessarily a unique risk in today’s environment.

R&I: Can you describe your approach to working with senior leaders and front-line staff alike to further risk management initiatives?

It starts with keeping the pulse of what’s happening with the business. Retail moves really fast. In order to identify and mitigate risks proactively, we identify top risk areas and topics, and then we ensure that we have strong partnerships with the leaders responsible for those areas. Trust is critical, ensuring that leaders see us as a support rather than a blocker.

R&I: What role does technology play in your company’s approach to risk management?

Janine Kral, claims adjuster, Nordstrom

We have an internal risk management information system that all of our locations report events into — every type of incident is reported, whether insured or uninsured. Most of these events are managed internally by risk management, and our guidelines require that prevention be analyzed on each one. Having all event data in one system allows us to use the data for trending and also helps us better predict what may happen in the future, and who we need to work with to mitigate risks.

R&I: What advice might you give to students or other aspiring risk managers?

My son is a sophomore in college, and I tell him and his friends all the time not to rule out insurance as a career opportunity. My advice is to cast a wide net and do your homework. Research all the different types of opportunities. Read a lot — articles, industry magazines, LinkedIn. Be proactive and reach out to people you find interesting and ask them about their careers. Don’t be shy and wait for people and opportunities to come to you. Ask questions. Build networks. Be curious and keep an open mind.

R&I: What are your goals for the next five to 10 years of your career?

I have always been passionate about continuous improvement. I want to continue to find ways to add value to my company and to this industry.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

My favorite book is Shantaram by Gregory David Roberts. It’s a true story about a man who was in prison in Australia after being convicted of armed robbery, and he escaped to India. While in India, he passed himself off as a doctor in a slum. It’s a really interesting story, because this is a convicted criminal who ends up helping others. I am not always successful in getting others to read the book because it’s 1,000 pages and definitely a commitment.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

Fiorella’s in Newton, Massachusetts. Great Italian food and a great overall experience.

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R&I: What is your favorite drink?

“Sister Carol.” I have no idea what is in it, and I can only get it at a local bar in Seattle. It’s green but it’s delicious.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Skydiving. Not tandem and without any sort of communication from the ground. Scary standing on a wing of a plane, but very peaceful once the chute opened, slowly floating down by myself.

R&I: If the world has a modern hero, who is it and why?

I can’t think of one individual person. For me, the real heroes are people who have a positive attitude in the face of adversity. People who are resilient no matter what life brings them.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

It’s rewarding to help solve problems and help people. I am proud of the support that my team provides others. &




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]