Risk Insider: Jeff Driver

Hooba-Dooba! Digital Health Care Reality

By: | May 1, 2017 • 2 min read
Jeff Driver is the Chief Risk Officer- Stanford University Medical Center and the Chief Executive Officer - The Risk Authority, LLC. He can be reached at [email protected]

“Jane, stop this crazy thing!” George yells.

He’s stuck on a treadmill that he can’t turn off, and seems in peril of being flung into the sky. In addition to “Hooba-Dooba,” (indicating both surprise and appreciation) this is George Jetson’s common response to interacting with the once fantastical technological advances of his life in Orbit City.

The Jetsons predicted it all. From video calls to smart homes, delivery drones to flying cars, the technology once only imagined by the animators at Hanna-Barbera has altered the shape of contemporary life. These technologies are no longer a futuristic dream; rather, they are an emerging reality.

Health care too is embracing revolutionary and rapidly evolving digital medicine that a decade ago we could hardly conceive of.

Experts explain digital medicine as the convergence of the digital and genomic revolutions with health care to better track, manage and improve our health to live better, more productive lives and to improve society. In many cases, it can also impact inefficiencies in health care delivery, such as improve access to care, reduce health care costs, increase quality, and make the delivery of care more personalized and precise.

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For examples, several apps exist for the early detection of melanoma, offering users the ability to snap photos of moles and skin conditions and send them in for almost instant analysis. Smart, cell-based therapeutics are being developed that can monitor and even regulate insulin delivery through the use of a smart phone. There are also apps to assist with mental health, including guided meditation, reduction in negative thinking, and mindfulness. These programs integrate almost seamlessly with our every day lives.

But in health care risk management, we know that it’s not quite so simple, and the “rewards” that digital medicine can offer do not come without risk. It’s our job to identify and mitigate these emerging risks; which can have potentially damaging effects on patients and organizations:

Cyber security/Privacy/Hacking: As medical devices are increasingly connected to the internet, hospital IT systems, and other medical devices, there is a higher risk of hackers collecting sensitive information, or worse, interrupting life-critical systems that protect human life.

Misdiagnosis/Inaccuracy: While rife with potential for preventative health care, some apps have been developed without being validated for diagnostic accuracy or utility using the highest standards in research methods.

Ethical Breaches: As digital data production, storage, and analysis continue to advance, the way that biomedical research is conducted has changed; the ethics of data-driven biomedical research must keep pace with these transformative developments.

With of each of these risks arise salient questions, potential vulnerabilities, and possible solutions, which we will explore further in PART II of this segment. Digital medicine will continue to grow and spread, in fact, the FDA has allocated resources to facilitate its development. We look to a future full of both risk and possibility, particularly as these rapidly evolving technologies are applied in healthcare.

Hooba-dooba indeed.

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

After 20 years in the business, Navy Pier’s Director of Risk Management values her relationships in the industry more than ever.
By: | June 1, 2017 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

Working at Dominick’s Finer Foods bagging groceries. Shortly after I was hired, I was promoted to [cashier] and then to a management position. It taught me great responsibility and it helped me develop the leadership skills I still carry today.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

While working for Hyatt Regency McCormick Place Hotel, one of my responsibilities was to oversee the administration of claims. This led to a business relationship with the director of risk management of the organization who actually owned the property. Ultimately, a position became available in her department and the rest is history.

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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The risk management community is doing a phenomenal job in professional development and creating great opportunities for risk managers to network. The development of relationships in this industry is vitally important and by providing opportunities for risk managers to come together and speak about their experiences and challenges is what enables many of us to be able to do our jobs even more effectively.

R&I: What could the risk management community be doing a better job of?

Attracting, educating and retaining young talent. There is this preconceived notion that the insurance industry and risk management are boring and there could be nothing further from the truth.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

In my 20 years in the industry, the biggest change in risk management and the insurance industry are the various types of risk we look to insure against. Many risks that exist today were not even on our radar 20 years ago.

Gina Kirchner, director of risk management, Navy Pier Inc.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

FM Global. They have been our property carrier for a great number of years and in my opinion are the best in the business.

R&I: Are you optimistic about the US economy or pessimistic and why?

I am optimistic that policies will be put in place with the new administration that will be good for the economy and business.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

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The commercial risks that are of most concern to me are cyber risks, business interruption, and any form of a health epidemic on a global scale. We are dealing with new exposures and new risks that we are truly not ready for.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

My mother has played a significant role in shaping my ideals and values. She truly instilled a very strong work ethic in me. However, there are many men and women in business who have mentored me and have had a significant impact on me and my career as well.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

I am most proud of making the decision a couple of years ago to return to school and obtain my [MBA]. It took a lot of prayer, dedication and determination to accomplish this while still working a full time job, being involved in my church, studying abroad and maintaining a household.

R&I: What is your favorite book or movie?

“Heaven Is For Real” by Todd Burpo and Lynn Vincent. I loved the book and the movie.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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A French restaurant in Paris, France named Les Noces de Jeannette Restaurant à Paris. It was the most amazing food and brings back such great memories.

R&I: What is the most unusual/interesting place you have ever visited?

Israel. My husband and I just returned a few days ago and spent time in Jerusalem, Nazareth, Jericho and Jordan. It was an absolutely amazing experience. We did everything from riding camels to taking boat rides on the Sea of Galilee to attending concerts sitting on the Temple steps. The trip was absolutely life changing.

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

Many, many years ago … I went parasailing in the Caribbean. I had a great experience and didn’t think about the risk at the time because I was young, single and free. Looking back, I don’t know that I would make the same decision today.

R&I: What about this work do you find the most fulfilling or rewarding?

I would have to say the relationships and partnerships I have developed with insurance carriers, brokers and other professionals in the industry. To have wonderful working relationships with such a vast array of talented individuals who are so knowledgeable and to have some of those relationships develop into true friendships is very rewarding.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

My friends and family have a general idea that my position involves claims and insurance. However, I don’t think they fully understand the magnitude of my responsibilities and the direct impact it has on my organization, which experiences more than 9 million visitors a year.




Katie Siegel is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]