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Insurance Executive

Greenberg Settles Case with New York AG After 12-Year Fight

Starr's CEO and Chairman decries the breadth of New York State's prosecutorial powers.
By: | February 14, 2017 • 3 min read

AIG’s former CEO and CFO settled a civil accounting fraud case last week that spanned 12 years, stretching back to the administration of former New York State Attorney General Eliot Spitzer.

In settling the case with current NYAG Eric Schneiderman, former AIG Chairman and CEO Hank Greenberg and Howard Smith, AIG’s former CFO, agreed to payments totaling $9.9 million; $9 million on the part of Mr. Greenberg and $900,000 on the part of Mr. Smith.

The case was mediated by noted attorney Kenneth Feinberg, who also mediated between British Petroleum and claimants in BP’s Gulf of Mexico oil spill and who will also be managing the claimants’ fund connected to the Volkswagen emissions scandal.

As part of the settlement, there was no admission of wrongdoing on the part of Greenberg, now the chairman and CEO of the Starr Companies, or Smith.

In a statement released Feb. 9, the New York Attorney General’s office said the $9.9 million represented bonus payments Greenberg and Smith received between 2001 and 2004. Despite the terms of the mediated settlement, the AG’s statement implied that the agreement amounted to an admission of fraud by Greenberg and Smith.

Both men strongly dispute that characterization of the settlement.

At a press conference in New York on February 13, Greenberg’s attorney David Boies, described the payments as nothing more than a “nuisance settlement” given the fact that the NYAG’s office had originally sought some $5 billion in damages.

“The New York Attorney General’s case had totally collapsed at trial,” said Boies.

In all, the civil actions initiated by Spitzer in 2005 amounted to nine separate charges.

One of the last two actions to reach settlement is related to a loss portfolio that AIG received as a reinsurer from Berkshire Hathaway subsidiary Cologne Re Dublin in the fourth quarter of 2000. Unbeknownst to Greenberg and other executives at AIG, a portion of the portfolio had already been reinsured elsewhere.

Thus, AIG’s acceptance of the portfolio resulted in an erroneous increase in its loss reserves, since the transaction involved little or no actual risk. An innocent accounting error that they were not aware of, not fraud, Greenberg, Smith and their attorneys argued.

“Nowhere in the agreed statement by Mr. Greenberg is there any reference to any accounting being fraudulent, let alone that Mr. Greenberg was aware of any fraud,” Boies said on Feb. 13.

“There was nothing in those transactions that we knew were wrong when they were done,” Smith added.

The second case, known as the Capco transaction, involved allegations that AIG attempted to confuse investors by equating underwriting losses with investment losses.

“The New York Attorney General’s case had totally collapsed at trial.” — David Boies, attorney for Hank Greenberg

Greenberg’s conflict with Spitzer is a long and painful one and can reasonably be said to have had a substantial impact on the nation’s and the world’s economy.

Under pressure from Spitzer, Greenberg was forced out as Chairman and CEO of AIG in 2005, having spent 40 years with the company.

At the time of Greenberg’s forced resignation, AIG had a presence in more than 130 countries and $180 billion in market capitalization. Three years after Greenberg’s removal, the company’s insurance of credit default swaps resulted in an almost catastrophic failure.  The rest is, literally, history.

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AIG required an $85 billion two-year government loan, which it has since paid back; but it had to sell off key assets to do so.

“AIG is currently a shadow of what it had been,” Greenberg said in a statement released on Feb. 13.

“It was an international asset and no longer is,” Greenberg said.

“It employed over 100,000 people and now it is about half of that.”

Greenberg is pursuing a defamation case against Spitzer for comments Spitzer made about him after leaving the AG’s office in 2006. Spitzer lasted a year as Governor of New York before allegations that he consorted with prostitutes drove him out of that office.

Greenberg also spoke out at the press conference in opposition to New York’s Martin Act, which gives state prosecutors broad powers to prosecute business leaders without having to prove fraudulent intent.

“That law should be changed, it should be knocked out,” Greenberg said.

Dan Reynolds is editor-in-chief of Risk & Insurance. He can be reached at [email protected]

More from Risk & Insurance

More from Risk & Insurance

Risk Management

The Profession

The risk manager for Boyd Gaming Corp. says curiosity keeps him engaged, and continual education will be the key to managing emerging risks.
By: | May 1, 2018 • 4 min read

R&I: What was your first job?

I was trained as an accountant, worked in public accounting and became a CPA. Being comfortable with numbers is helpful in my current role, and obviously, the language of business is financial statements, so it helps.

R&I: How did you come to work in risk management?

Working in finance in the corporate environment included the review of budgets and the analysis of business expenses. I quickly found the area of benefits and insurance — and how “accepting risk” impacted those expenses — to be fascinating. I asked a lot of questions. Be careful what you ask for — I soon found myself responsible for those insurance areas and haven’t looked back!

R&I: What is the risk management community doing right?

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I have found the risk management community to be a close-knit group, whether that’s industry professionals, risk managers with other companies or support organizations like RIMS and other regional groups. The expertise of the carriers and specialty vendors to develop new products and programs, along with the appropriate education, will continue to be of key importance to companies going forward.

R&I: What’s been the biggest change in the risk management and insurance industry since you’ve been in it?

As I’m sure many in the insurance field would agree, Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005 changed our world and our industry. It was a particularly intense time and certainly a baptism by fire for people like me who were relatively new to the industry. This event clearly accelerated the switch to the acceptance of more risk, which impacted mitigation strategies and programs.

Bob Berglund, vice president, benefits and insurance, Boyd Gaming Corp.

R&I: What emerging commercial risk most concerns you?

The fast-paced threat that cyber security represents today. Our company, like so many companies, is reliant upon computers, software and IT expertise in our everyday existence. This new risk has forged an even stronger relationship between risk management and our IT department as we work together to address this growing threat.

Additionally, the shooting event in Las Vegas in 2017 will have an enduring impact on firms that host large gatherings and arena-style events all over the world, and our company is no exception.

R&I: What insurance carrier do you have the highest opinion of?

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With the various types of insurance programs we employ, I have been fortunate to work with most of the large national and international carriers — all of whom employ talented people with a vast array of resources.

R&I:  How much business do you do direct versus going through a broker?

We use brokers for many of our professional coverages, such as property, casualty, D&O and cyber. We are self-insured under our health plans, with close to 25,000 members. We tend to manage those programs internally and utilize direct relationships with carriers and specialty vendors to tailor a plan that works best for team members.

R&I: Who is your mentor and why?

I have been fortunate to have worked alongside some smart and insightful people during my career. A key piece of advice, said in many different ways, has served me well. Simply stated: “Seek to understand before being understood.”

What this has meant to me is try everything you can to learn about something, new or old. After you have gained this knowledge, you can begin to access and maybe suggest changes or adjustments. Being curious has always been a personal enjoyment for me in business, and I have found people are more than willing to lend a hand, offer information and advice — you just need to ask. Building those alliances and foundations of knowledge on a subject matter makes tackling the future more exciting and fruitful.

R&I: What have you accomplished that you are proudest of?

Our benefit health plan is much more than handing out an insurance card at the beginning of the year. We encourage our team members and their families to learn about their personal health, get engaged in a variety of health and wellness programs and try to live life in the healthiest possible way. The result of that is literally hundreds of testimonials from our members every year on how they have lost weight, changed their lifestyle and gotten off medications. It is extremely rewarding and is a testament to [our] close-knit corporate culture.

R&I: What’s the best restaurant you’ve ever eaten at?

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Some will remember the volcano eruption in Iceland in spring of 2010. I was just finishing a week of meetings in London with Lloyd’s syndicates related to our property insurance placement when the airspace in England and most of northern Europe was shut down — no airplanes in or out! Flights were ultimately canceled for the following five days. Therefore, with a few other stranded visitors like myself, we experimented and tried out new restaurants every day until we could leave. It was a very interesting time!

R&I: What is the riskiest activity you ever engaged in?

I am originally from Canada, and I played ice hockey from the time I was four years old up until quite recently. Too many surgeries sadly forced my recent retirement.

R&I: What do your friends and family think you do?

That’s a funny one … I am a CPA working in the casino industry, doing insurance and risk management, so neighbors and acquaintances think I either do tax returns or they think I’m a blackjack dealer at the casino!




Katie Dwyer is an associate editor at Risk & Insurance®. She can be reached at [email protected]