Sponsored: Starr Companies

Fraud Alert: Have Your Employees Been Compromised?

More sophisticated and emerging forms of cyber fraud demonstrate how easy it is to fall victim to this type of threat.
By: | December 1, 2017 • 5 min read

Call it spear phishing, social engineering or business email compromise. This type of scheme has gotten plenty of coverage in recent years — when fraudsters posing as the boss or a vendor, or client convince an authorized employee to wire transfer funds to a fraudulent account, never to be seen again. Historically, it’s been a form of fraud that offers a quick payout and requires little work on the part of the perpetrator.

But now the thieves are changing their tactics.

“The methods used to perpetrate these fraudulent events are evolving. The fraudsters are investing more effort in orchestrating them, as the payouts can be significant. The targeted “windfall” has expanded too. No longer is it limited to a transfer of funds. We’re now seeing schemes resulting in the fraudulent transfer of tangible property,” said Patricia Barrett, Vice President and Head of Fidelity, Starr Companies.

Criminals are setting their sights on a company’s goods, not just their cash.

To pull that off, thieves use a hybrid of traditional fraud and sophisticated cyber tactics. Through hacking and malware, they can spy on a company’s operations, gathering valuable intelligence on executives and employees. Then they use social engineering tactics to trick workers into unwittingly sending a shipment of products their way.

An Emerging Form of Fraud: A Case Study

Patricia Barrett, Vice President and Head of Fidelity

The experience of one small business — a distributor of small electronic devices — demonstrates how easy it is to fall victim to this type of theft. To sell its products, this company relied on its executives traveling to trade shows throughout the year, often for weeks at a time.

A fraudster, posing as a prospective customer, sent a link in an email to the company’s sales department. Once opened, the link set loose malware that allowed the perpetrator to “lie in wait,” watching the moves of company insiders. The fraudster knew who was scheduled to travel, when, and what type of property the traveler would need to have delivered. The fraudster knew the vernacular used by traveling executives, and what the protocol was for change requests.

Back at the office one day, an employee received an email that appeared to be from the chief executive. “Joe, the trade shows are going really well,” he said, “In fact, I’m down to less than a dozen mobile devices; I’m likely to run out before reaching my next stop.” He instructed the employee to send an additional shipment of electronics to the location of the next show in Las Vegas.

But there was a wrinkle. He’d had to change some travel plans and would no longer be staying at the conference hotel. He booked a room at the hotel across the street. He asked the employee to direct the shipment there instead.

Everything about the request made sense. It was feasible that the executive might need more products. He stated correctly where the next show would be. There was no reason to doubt that he had decided to switch hotels.

“The employee never questioned that the instruction came from the chief executive, so he transferred that property to the hotel and the entire shipment was lost,” Barrett said.

Hybrid Tactics

Executing this theft requires in-depth knowledge of a company’s hierarchy, business processes, and of the employees themselves. Because the potential payout is so large, these fraudsters often spend months gathering information before hitting “send” on that fraudulent email.

Malware is often part of their intel-gathering and may be introduced through social engineering. A phony email asking an employee to click a link or download an attachment could be all it takes to get a virus into the system.

By gaining access to the company’s network, thieves can examine billing systems, transaction records and vendor lists, getting a sense of what a normal transfer of goods looks like and who performs them. They can even obtain the executive’s travel itinerary.

They can also glean personal details and communication styles easily from social media.

“The target employee may have posted that he left work early Friday afternoon to attend his son’s baseball game. The copycat executive in the fraudulent email might ask, ‘How was your afternoon off? Who won the game?’” Barrett said. “It builds familiarity. The employee wouldn’t suspect that anyone else would know that level of detail.”

Email is not the only way to perpetrate this type of fraud, however. Criminals can be just as convincing over the phone.

At one organization, the Accounts Payable department received a call from one of their purported vendors, stating that the vendor had consolidated some banking relationships and needed to change the account listed on their contract.

The accounts payable employee sent a change form to an email address provided by the caller. She did not check the master vendor file, but trusted that the email given to her was correct. She did not phone the vendor at a previously verified phone number to validate the request. The caller posing as a vendor sent back the updated form within 15 minutes, and the change was initiated.

The organization proceeded to make three payments to the fraudulent account totaling $700,000. The mistake was not discovered until the real vendor followed up, asking why their payments were delayed.

“The payments slipped through because this was a multi-million-dollar business relationship; and it was not uncommon for them to transact significant business in a short period of time,” Barrett said. “The same tactic could be used to make change orders, diverting a shipment of inventory.”

Coverage Questions

“Though several insurers will consider providing coverage for fraudulent impersonations that result in a loss of funds, a coverage gap still remains for a loss of other tangible property,” Barrett said.

As with the loss of funds, recovering the stolen property in most cases is next to impossible.

“Once discovered, the trail can go cold very quickly,” Barrett said. To recoup the loss, insureds may have to navigate the intersection of crime, fidelity, cyber, and professional liability coverages.

Coloring in the Gray Areas with Prevention and Targeted Coverage

As cyber criminals grow more sophisticated, calculating and patient, companies need solutions that fill in those gray areas so prevalent in the world of cyber threat and fraud.

Starr Companies crafted an endorsement to its crime and fidelity coverages that covers the loss of other tangible property, in addition to loss of funds, resulting from fraudulent impersonation scams.

“The expanded Fraudulent Impersonation endorsement allows a company to secure coverage for loss of funds and loss of other tangible property; The endorsement is flexible in its structure. This allows the coverage to address the risks that are of most concern to a company. Whether the company is concerned about a loss of funds, a loss of other tangible property, or both the endorsement can be crafted to meet that company’s interests,” Barrett said.

It is widely recognized that one of the best defenses against social engineering risks is education at all levels of a company.

With that in mind, Starr’s Fraudulent Impersonation endorsement is accompanied with the offer of the Starr Companies-KnowBe4 Risk Management Program. KnowBe4 is an internationally recognized IT security firm. This program provides valuable risk management tools to assist in reducing the risk to fraudulent impersonation (social engineering) losses. The downloadable documents are designed to be circulated to employees at every level of the insured company/organization. This program is offered by Starr Companies at no cost to the insured. Upon binding, the Insured company will receive an information packet with instructions on how to access an exclusive area of the KnowBe4 website.

“We believe that the combination of this risk management program and the insurance protection is a winning one for businesses of all types and sizes,” Barrett said.

“Our knowledge and expertise enable us to connect clients with expert resources and to tailor coverage to meet each client’s particular exposures and buying needs,” Barrett said.

Reach out to Starr’s Crime & Fidelity team for more information on how a Starr solution can work for you or visit www.starrcompanies.com/insurance/crimeandfidelity.

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This article was produced by the R&I Brand Studio, a unit of the advertising department of Risk & Insurance, in collaboration with Starr Companies. The editorial staff of Risk & Insurance had no role in its preparation.




Starr Companies is a global commercial insurance and financial services organization that provides innovative risk management solutions.

More from Risk & Insurance

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Property

Insurers Take to the Skies

This year’s hurricane season sees the use of drones and other aerial intelligence gathering systems as insurers seek to estimate claims costs.
By: | November 1, 2017 • 6 min read

For Southern communities, current recovery efforts in the wake of Hurricane Harvey will recall the painful devastation of 2005, when Katrina and Wilma struck. But those who look skyward will notice one conspicuous difference this time around: drones.

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Much has changed since Katrina and Wilma, both economically and technologically. The insurance industry evolved as well. Drones and other visual intelligence systems (VIS) are set to play an increasing role in loss assessment, claims handling and underwriting.

Farmers Insurance, which announced in August it launched a fleet of drones to enhance weather-related property damage claim assessment, confirmed it deployed its fleet in the aftermath of Harvey.

“The pent-up demand for drones, particularly from a claims-processing standpoint, has been accumulating for almost two years now,” said George Mathew, CEO of Kespry, Farmers’ drone and aerial intelligence platform provider partner.

“The current wind and hail damage season that we are entering is when many of the insurance carriers are switching from proof of concept work to full production rollout.”

 According to Mathew, Farmers’ fleet focused on wind damage in and around Corpus Christi, Texas, at the time of this writing. “Additional work is already underway in the greater Houston area and will expand in the coming weeks and months,” he added.

No doubt other carriers have fleets in the air. AIG, for example, occupied the forefront of VIS since winning its drone operation license in 2015. It deployed drones to inspections sites in the U.S. and abroad, including stadiums, hotels, office buildings, private homes, construction sites and energy plants.

Claims Response

At present, insurers are primarily using VIS for CAT loss assessment. After a catastrophe, access is often prohibited or impossible. Drones allow access for assessing damage over potentially vast areas in a more cost-effective and time-sensitive manner than sending human inspectors with clipboards and cameras.

“Drones improve risk analysis by providing a more efficient alternative to capturing aerial photos from a sky-view. They allow insurers to rapidly assess the scope of damages and provide access that may not otherwise be available,” explained Chris Luck, national practice leader of Advocacy at JLT Specialty USA.

“The pent-up demand for drones, particularly from a claims-processing standpoint, has been accumulating for almost two years now.” — George Mathew, CEO, Kespry

“In our experience, competitive advantage is gained mostly by claims departments and third-party administrators. Having the capability to provide exact measurements and details from photos taken by drones allows insurers to expedite the claim processing time,” he added.

Indeed, as tech becomes more disruptive, insurers will increasingly seek to take advantage of VIS technologies to help them provide faster, more accurate and more efficient insurance solutions.

Duncan Ellis, U.S. property practice leader, Marsh

One way Farmers is differentiating its drone program is by employing its own FAA-licensed drone operators, who are also Farmers-trained claim representatives.

Keith Daly, E.V.P. and chief claims officer for Farmers Insurance, said when launching the program that this sets Farmers apart from most carriers, who typically engage third-party drone pilots to conduct evaluations.

“In the end, it’s all about the experience for the policyholder who has their claim adjudicated in the most expeditious manner possible,” said Mathew.

“The technology should simply work and just melt away into the background. That’s why we don’t just focus on building an industrial-grade drone, but a complete aerial intelligence platform for — in this case — claims management.”

Insurance Applications

Duncan Ellis, U.S. property practice leader at Marsh, believes that, while currently employed primarily to assess catastrophic damage, VIS will increasingly be employed to inspect standard property damage claims.

However, he admitted that at this stage they are better at identifying binary factors such as the area affected by a peril rather than complex assessments, since VIS cannot look inside structures nor assess their structural integrity.

“If a chemical plant suffers an explosion, it might be difficult to say whether the plant is fully or partially out of operation, for example, which would affect a business interruption claim dramatically.

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“But for simpler assessments, such as identifying how many houses or industrial units have been destroyed by a tornado, or how many rental cars in a lot have suffered hail damage from a storm, a VIS drone could do this easily, and the insurer can calculate its estimated losses from there,” he said.

In addition,VIS possess powerful applications for pre-loss risk assessment and underwriting. The high-end drones used by insurers can capture not just visual images, but mapping heat, moisture or 3D topography, among other variables.

This has clear applications in the assessment and completion of claims, but also in potentially mitigating risk before an event happens, and pricing insurance accordingly.

“VIS and drones will play an increasing underwriting support role as they can help underwriters get a better idea of the risk — a picture tells a thousand words and is so much better than a report,” said Ellis.

VIS images allow underwriters to see risks in real time, and to visually spot risk factors that could get overlooked using traditional checks or even mature visual technologies like satellites. For example, VIS could map thermal hotspots that could signal danger or poor maintenance at a chemical plant.

Chris Luck, national practice leader of Advocacy, JLT Specialty USA

“Risk and underwriting are very natural adjacencies, especially when high risk/high value policies are being underwritten,” said Mathew.

“We are in a transformational moment in insurance where claims processing, risk management and underwriting can be reimagined with entirely new sources of data. The drone just happens to be one of most compelling of those sources.”

Ellis added that drones also could be employed to monitor supplies in the marine, agriculture or oil sectors, for example, to ensure shipments, inventories and supply chains are running uninterrupted.

“However, we’re still mainly seeing insurers using VIS drones for loss assessment and estimates, and it’s not even clear how extensively they are using drones for that purpose at this point,” he noted.

“Insurers are experimenting with this technology, but given that some of the laws around drone use are still developing and restrictions are often placed on using drones [after] a CAT event, the extent to which VIS is being used is not made overly public.”

Drone inspections could raise liability risks of their own, particularly if undertaken in busy spaces in which they could cause human injury.

Privacy issues also are a potential stumbling block, so insurers are dipping their toes into the water carefully.

Risk Improvement

There is no doubt, however, that VIS use will increase among insurers.

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“Although our clients do not have tremendous experience utilizing drones, this technology is beneficial in many ways, from providing security monitoring of their perimeter to loss control inspections of areas that would otherwise require more costly inspections using heavy equipment or climbers,” said Luck.

In other words, drones could help insurance buyers spot weaknesses, mitigate risk and ultimately win more favorable coverage from their insurers.

“Some risks will see pricing and coverage improvements because the information and data provided by drones will put underwriters at ease and reduce uncertainty,” said Ellis.

The flip-side, he noted, is that there will be fewer places to hide for companies with poor risk management that may have been benefiting from underwriters not being able to access the full picture.

Either way, drones will increasingly help insurers differentiate good risks from bad. In time, they may also help insurance buyers differentiate between carriers, too. &

Antony Ireland is a London-based financial journalist. He can be reached at [email protected]